Special Issue "Dietary (Poly)Phenols and Health"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Phytochemicals and Human Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Assoc. Prof. Přemysl Mladěnka
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Research group of Cardiovascular and respiratory pharmacology and toxicology, Laboratory of cardiovascular pharmacology, Charles University, Hradec Králové, Czech Republic
Tel. 731613421
Interests: flavonoid; phenolic; coumarin; cardiovascular; trace metals; platelet

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Previously, the positive effects of (poly)phenolic compounds on human health were explained by direct scavenging effect of the parent compounds toward reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. However, recently, a number of publications have documented specific effects of dietary (poly)phenolics mediated by their metabolites. This Special Issue aims to present novel findings documenting the relevant effects (positive but potentially also negative) of dietary (poly)phenolic compounds taking their pharmacokinetics in the consideration. Relevant effects refer to the activities which can have a potential clinical impact on human diseases and/or health. Emphasis will be given to miscellaneous metabolites, including conjugates formed by human enzymes and small phenolic compounds formed by the gastrointestinal microflora.

Original articles, review papers, and short communications with significant novelty are welcome. Papers reporting the effects of plant extracts are also acceptable but only on the condition that they include the specification of (at least major) contained substances and pharmacokinetic data or are based on reliable previous publications.

Assoc. Prof. Přemysl Mladěnka
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • polyphenol
  • natural
  • metabolite
  • disorder
  • flavonoid
  • coumarin
  • lignan
  • phenolic acid

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessCommunication
A Mixture of Phenolic Metabolites of Quercetin Can Decrease Elevated Blood Pressure of Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats Even in Low Doses
Nutrients 2020, 12(1), 213; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12010213 - 14 Jan 2020
Abstract
Quercetin is proven to decrease arterial blood pressure when given orally. Its bioavailability is, however, low and, therefore, its metabolites could rather be responsible for this effect. In particular, the colonic metabolites of quercetin, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DHPA), 4-methylcatechol (4MC), and 3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid (3HPPA), [...] Read more.
Quercetin is proven to decrease arterial blood pressure when given orally. Its bioavailability is, however, low and, therefore, its metabolites could rather be responsible for this effect. In particular, the colonic metabolites of quercetin, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DHPA), 4-methylcatechol (4MC), and 3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid (3HPPA), have been previously shown to decrease the blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Interestingly, the mechanisms of action of these three metabolites are different. The aim of this study is hence to investigate if these metabolites can potentiate each other and thus decrease blood pressure in reduced doses. Three double-combinations of previously mentioned metabolites were administered to SHR as infusions to mimic a real biological situation. All combinations significantly decreased the blood pressure in SHR but there were important differences. The effect of DHPA and 4MC was mild and very short. A combination of DHPA with 3HPPA caused more pronounced effects, which were also rather short-lived. The last combination of 3HPPA and 4MC caused a long-lasting effect. In conclusion, certain combinations of quercetin metabolites have a more pronounced antihypertensive effect than single metabolites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary (Poly)Phenols and Health)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

  1. Title: Natural sources, pharmacokinetic properties, biological activities and health benefits of hydroxycinnamic acids, their conjugates and derivatives.
    Authors: Luciano Saso; Matej Sova
    Affiliations: University of Ljubjana, Slovenia & University La Sapienza, Rome, Italy
    Emails: [email protected], [email protected]
  2.  Title: Mixture of phenolic metabolites of quercetin can decrease elevated blood pressure of spontaneously hypertensive rats even in low doses
    Authors: Iveta Najmanová, Jana Pourová and Přemysl Mladěnka

 

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