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Understanding the Link between Oral Health, Nutrition, and Health Outcomes in Older Adults

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Geriatric Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 July 2024 | Viewed by 4177

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Division of Comprehensive Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry & Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata University, Niigata 951-8514, Japan
Interests: clinical physiology; geriatric; dentistry; nutrition; cerebral hemodynamic; cognition
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Guest Editor
1. Center for Genomic Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan
2. Graduate School of Public Health, Shizuoka Graduate University of Public Health, Shizuoka 420-0881, Japan
Interests: genetic meidicine; hypertension; epidemiology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nutritional status is an important factor in the overall health of older adults. Malnutrition can significantly elevate the risk of various adverse outcomes, including falls, frailty, depression, impaired functional ability, increased susceptibility to infections, prolonged hospital stays, higher mortality rates, and a greater economic burden on both the individual and society. The promotion of oral health serves as an initial step in preventing these health problems while also lowering the risk of malnutrition. Oral health also plays an important role in the essential human activity of eating, and nutrition in the geriatric period is closely associated with oral health status. Nevertheless, the dynamic interaction between oral health and an individual’s overall physical and mental well-being can evolve over the course of one's life, often in tandem with changes in nutritional status, although their reporting and causal relationships have not been fully explored. In this Special Issue, I hope to gather valuable evidence on various aspects of understanding the link between oral health, nutrition, and health outcomes in older adults. I hope that this publication will provide new insights and build upon existing knowledge.

Dr. Yoko Hasegawa
Prof. Dr. Yasuharu Tabara
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • nutrition
  • oral health
  • cognition
  • physical and psychological status
  • disease onset

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 1232 KiB  
Article
Development of the Food Acceptance Questionnaire for Thai Partial and Complete Edentulism
by Ketsupha Suwanarpa, Yoko Hasegawa, Jarin Paphangkorakit, Waranuch Pitiphat, Kazuhiro Hori and Takahiro Ono
Nutrients 2024, 16(10), 1432; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16101432 - 9 May 2024
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Abstract
This study aimed to develop the Food Acceptance Questionnaire (FAQ) to assess the masticatory ability of Thai older adults (≥60 years). Fifty participants were interviewed using open-ended questions about food they regularly consumed and avoided due to difficulty chewing. From a list of [...] Read more.
This study aimed to develop the Food Acceptance Questionnaire (FAQ) to assess the masticatory ability of Thai older adults (≥60 years). Fifty participants were interviewed using open-ended questions about food they regularly consumed and avoided due to difficulty chewing. From a list of 140 items, 100 were recruited for a trial version of the FAQ. A total of 154 participants responded to the 5-point Likert scale on their chewing perception of each food item (1, impossible to chew; 5, most easily eaten). The average response of each food item was used as the chewing index (CI). The 100 food items were ranked and divided into five grades based on their CIs. Masticatory performance (MP) was objectively assessed by a visual scoring method using gummy jelly (UHA Mikakuto). Two foods from each grade that demonstrated the highest correlation with MP were selected to form the final 10-item FAQ. The FAQ score was calculated by summarizing the responses of 10 items. MP correlated strongly with the FAQ score (r = 0.57, p < 0.001), indicating its predictive validity. Furthermore, the FAQ indicates strong internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha coefficient = 0.90), indicating high reliability. In conclusion, this newly developed 10-item FAQ is valid and reliable for assessing the masticatory ability of Thai older adults. Full article
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13 pages, 632 KiB  
Article
Association between Oral Health and Depressive Symptoms in Chinese Older Adults: The Mediating Role of Dietary Diversity
by Jiaxu Lou, Jian Wang, Yingjie Fu, Derong Huang, Mei Liu, Ruonan Zhao and Jiahui Deng
Nutrients 2024, 16(8), 1231; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16081231 - 21 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Diet is a modifiable factor in healthy population aging. Additionally, oral health and diet are important factors affecting depressive symptoms. To assess the mediating role of dietary diversity (DD) in oral health and depressive symptoms in older adults, we selected 8442 participants aged [...] Read more.
Diet is a modifiable factor in healthy population aging. Additionally, oral health and diet are important factors affecting depressive symptoms. To assess the mediating role of dietary diversity (DD) in oral health and depressive symptoms in older adults, we selected 8442 participants aged ≥ 65 years from the 2018 Chinese Longitudinal Health Longevity Survey (CLHLS) for a cross-sectional study. Depressive symptoms were determined based on scores on the 10-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CESD-10). Dietary diversity scores (DDS) were established based on the frequency of intake of food groups. Oral health was measured by denture use and toothbrushing frequency. Stepwise multiple linear regression and PROCESS macros were used for mediated effects analysis and testing. The sample had a positive detection rate of 44.1% for depressive symptoms, 40.8% for denture use, and 41.9% for once-a-day toothbrushing. Denture use (ρ = −0.077, p < 0.01) and toothbrushing frequency (ρ = −0.115, p < 0.01) were negative predictors of depressive symptoms in older adults. DD significantly mediated the association between denture use (indirect effect −0.047; 95%CI: −0.068–0.028; p < 0.001), toothbrushing frequency (indirect effect −0.041; 95%CI: −0.054–0.030; p < 0.001), and depressive symptoms. Denture use and toothbrushing frequency not only directly reduce the risk of depressive symptoms in older adults, but also indirectly affect depressive symptoms through DD. Full article
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15 pages, 2875 KiB  
Article
Skin Anti-Aging Efficacy of Enzyme-Treated Supercritical Caviar Extract: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial
by Gwi Hwan Na, SukJin Kim, Hyun Mook Jung, Sang Hun Han, Jehee Han and Yean Kyoung Koo
Nutrients 2024, 16(1), 137; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16010137 - 30 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2415
Abstract
Oxidative stress in the skin, induced by an unhealthy lifestyle and exposure to UVB radiation, leads to skin aging, including reduced elasticity, formation of wrinkles, moisture loss, and inflammation. In a previous study, we revealed the photoaging effects of enzyme-treated caviar extract (CV) [...] Read more.
Oxidative stress in the skin, induced by an unhealthy lifestyle and exposure to UVB radiation, leads to skin aging, including reduced elasticity, formation of wrinkles, moisture loss, and inflammation. In a previous study, we revealed the photoaging effects of enzyme-treated caviar extract (CV) by regulating collagen and hyaluronic acid synthase, melanogenesis, anti-oxidant mechanisms, and inflammation in a UVB irradiation-induced mice model. HPLC and MALDI-TOF were performed to determine the effect of enzyme treatment on the free amino acid contents and peptide molecular weight in supercritical caviar extract. As results of the analysis, CV is mainly composed of low-molecular-weight peptides consisting of leucine, tyrosine, and phenylalanine. Based on our in vitro and in vivo study, we conducted a clinical trial to assess the skin anti-aging efficacy of CV. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we measured indicators related to elasticity, wrinkles, and skin hydration at 4 and 8 weeks after consumption of CV. The subjects were categorized into caviar, combination, and placebo groups. After 4 weeks, skin hydration, dermal hydration, and transepidermal water loss all showed significant improvement. Furthermore, after 8 weeks, skin elasticity indexes—R2 (total elasticity), R5 (net elasticity), and R7 (ratio of elastic recovery to total deformation)—exhibited significant increases. Improvement in wrinkle indicators (Rmax, Ra, and Rz) and the whitening indicator melanin pigment was also observed. This is the first report showing that CV has significant skin anti-aging efficacy on human skin. In conclusion, our study suggests that CV can be used as skin anti-aging nutraceuticals through positive effects on skin condition in clinical trials. Full article
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