Special Issue "Nanocarriers and Targeted Drug Delivery"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 January 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Maria Letizia Manca
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Scienzedella Vita e dell’Ambiente, Sezione di Scienze del Farmaco, University of Cagliari, Via Ospedale 72, 09124 Cagliari, Italy
Interests: nanocarriers as delivery systems for natural and synthetic active ingredients; topical delivery; wound healing; nasal delivery; oral delivery; pulmonary delivery; antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-microbial activities; conventional liposomes and liposome-like systems for drug delivery
Prof. Dr. Maria Manconi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Scienze della Vita e dell’Ambiente, Sezione di Scienze del Farmaco, University of Cagliari, Via Ospedale 72, 09124 Cagliari, Italy
Tel. 0039 0706758542
Interests: formulation of innovative phospholipid vesicles; delivery of drugs, natural molecules, or extracts; topical, oral, and pulmonary delivery; wound healing; antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial activities
Dr. Catalina Anisoara Peptu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Natural and Synthetic Polymers, Gheorghe Asachi Technical University of Iasi, Professor doctor docent Dimitrie Mangeron Street 73, 700050, Iasi, Romania
Tel. +40-232-278683-2332
Interests: micro and nanoparticles as drug delivery systems, polymer films and hydrogels, polysaccharides

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanocarriers have shown great potential as delivery systems of drugs and natural bioactive molecules and play a promising role in the field of nanomedicine. They have been studied for a wide range of applications and are able to improve the sensitivity, efficacy, and safety of traditional or alternative drugs acting at systemic, organ, tissue, cell, and pathophysiological environment levels in multiple disease conditions. They represent a suitable solution to efficiently treat human pathologies via the smart formulation of synthetic or natural active molecules. The development of tailored nanocarriers with selected materials, special surface-modifying agents, and stabilizers may ensure the achievement of a specific site or specific tissues, reducing the administered dose and especially the side effects, whatever the chosen route of administration.

This Special Issue aims to collect original articles (full papers, communications, and reviews), from a broad community of scientists working on diverse applications of nanotechnology, and interdisciplinary teams focusing on recent advances in the formulation of nanocarriers, including but not limited to polymer nanoparticles, phospholipid vesicles, multifunctional nanocarriers, and surface-modified or stimuli-responsive nanoparticles or micelles. These have been designed as delivery systems for synthetic drugs, natural bioactive molecules, or plant extracts, and are able to reach the desired target site owing to their composition.

Dr. Maria Letizia Manca
Prof. Dr. Maria Manconi
Dr. Catalina Anisoara Peptu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Natural molecules
  • Plant extracts
  • Targeted delivery systems
  • Nanoparticles
  • Liposomes
  • Micelles
  • Oral delivery
  • Pulmonary delivery
  • Topical delivery
  • Parenteral administration.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Trastuzumab-Modified Gold Nanoparticles Labeled with 211At as a Prospective Tool for Local Treatment of HER2-Positive Breast Cancer
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(4), 632; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9040632 - 18 Apr 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Highly localized radiotherapy with radionuclides is a commonly used treatment modality for patients with unresectable solid tumors. Herein, we propose a novel α-nanobrachytherapy approach for selective therapy of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer. This uses local intratumoral injection of [...] Read more.
Highly localized radiotherapy with radionuclides is a commonly used treatment modality for patients with unresectable solid tumors. Herein, we propose a novel α-nanobrachytherapy approach for selective therapy of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer. This uses local intratumoral injection of 5-nm-diameter gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) labeled with an α-emitter (211At), modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains and attached to HER2-specific monoclonal antibody (trastuzumab). The size, shape, morphology, and zeta potential of the 5 nm synthesized AuNPs were characterized by TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) and DLS (Dynamic Light Scattering) techniques. The gold nanoparticle surface was modified by PEG and subsequently used for antibody immobilization. Utilizing the high affinity of gold for heavy halogens, the bioconjugate was labelled with 211At obtained by α irradiation of the bismuth target. The labeling yield of 211At was greater than 99%. 211At bioconjugates were stable in human serum. Additionally, in vitro biological studies indicated that 211At-AuNP-PEG-trastuzumab exhibited higher affinity and cytotoxicity towards the HER2-overexpressing human ovarian SKOV-3 cell line than unmodified nanoparticles. Confocal and dark field microscopy studies revealed that 211At-AuNP-PEG-trastuzumab was effectively internalized and deposited near the nucleus. These findings show promising potential for the 211At-AuNP-PEG-trastuzumab radiobioconjugate as a perspective therapeutic agent in the treatment of unresectable solid cancers expressing HER2 receptors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanocarriers and Targeted Drug Delivery)
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Open AccessArticle
An Available Strategy for Nasal Brain Transport of Nanocomposite Based on PAMAM Dendrimers via In Situ Gel
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(2), 147; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9020147 - 24 Jan 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers are efficient drug carriers. The presence of a physiological pathway for nasal brain transport provides a potential path for direct brain-targeted delivery of dendrimer nanocomposites. In this study, we synthesized PAMAM dendrimer composites with a nanoscale size; the particle size [...] Read more.
Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers are efficient drug carriers. The presence of a physiological pathway for nasal brain transport provides a potential path for direct brain-targeted delivery of dendrimer nanocomposites. In this study, we synthesized PAMAM dendrimer composites with a nanoscale size; the particle size of PAE (Paeonol)/mPEG (the heterofunctional PEG polymer with a methoxy)-PAMAM G5.NHAc and mPEG-PAMAM G5.NH2-FITC were 72.41 ± 11.58 nm and 96.51 ± 7.77 nm, and the zeta potential of PAE/mPEG-PAMAM G5.NHAc and mPEG-PAMAM G5.NH2-FITC were + 0.57 ± 0.11 mv and + 9.60 ± 0.41 mv, respectively. The EE% and DL% of PAE in PAE/mPEG-PAMAM G5.NHAc were 53.77% and 13.92%, respectively. PAE/mPEG-PAMAM G5.NHAc/DGG ionic-sensitive in situ gel was prepared, the viscosity of solution and gel state were 112 ± 3.2 mPa and 1403 ± 38.5 mPa, respectively. The in vitro goat mucoadhesive strength of the gel was 4763.36 ± 85.39 dyne/cm2. In situ gel system was proven to be a non-Newtonian pseudo-plastic fluid with shear thinning, thixotropy and yield stress. The optimal model of PAE released from PAE/mPEG-PAMAM G5.NHAc and PAE/mPEG-PAMAM G5.NHAc/DGG were the Higuchi equation and the Korsmeyer-Peppas equation, respectively. The cytotoxicity of the nanocomposites showed a concentration-dependence, and the cell viabilities of PAE/mPEG-PAMAM G5.NHAc were both higher than 95% between 0.0001 μM and 10 μM. mPEG-PAMAM G5.NH2-FITC was efficiently taken up by cells and exhibited strong fluorescence in the cytoplasm and nucleus. Significant accumulation of nanocomposites was observed in the brain after administration of the in situ gel group, and maximum accumulation was reached at 12 h. A small amount of accumulation was observed in the nanocomposite solution group only at 2 h. Therefore, the direct nasal brain transport efficiency of PAMAM dendrimer nanocomposites can be significantly improved after combining with in situ gel. PAMAM dendrimer nanocomposite/DGG is a potential drug delivery system for nasal brain transport. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanocarriers and Targeted Drug Delivery)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Nanomaterials for Drug Delivery to the Central Nervous System
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(3), 371; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9030371 - 05 Mar 2019
Cited by 8
Abstract
The intricate microstructure of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is responsible for the accurate intrinsic regulation of the central nervous system (CNS), in terms of neuronal pathophysiological phenomena. Any disruption to the BBB can be associated with genetic defects triggering or with local antigenic [...] Read more.
The intricate microstructure of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is responsible for the accurate intrinsic regulation of the central nervous system (CNS), in terms of neuronal pathophysiological phenomena. Any disruption to the BBB can be associated with genetic defects triggering or with local antigenic invasion (either neurotoxic blood-derived metabolites and residues or microbial pathogens). Such events can be further related to systemic inflammatory or immune disorders, which can subsequently initiate several neurodegenerative pathways. Any degenerative process related to the CNS results in progressive and yet incurable impairment of neuronal cells. Since these particular neurons are mostly scanty or incapable of self-repair and regeneration processes, there is tremendous worldwide interest in novel therapeutic strategies for such specific conditions. Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases (AD and PD, respectively) are conditions found worldwide, being considered the most rampant degenerative pathologies related to CNS. The current therapy of these conditions, including both clinical and experimental approaches, mainly enables symptom management and subsidiary neuronal protection and even less disease regression. Still, a thorough understanding of the BBB pathophysiology and an accurate molecular and sub-molecular management of AD and PD will provide beneficial support for more specific and selective therapy. Since nanotechnology-derived materials and devices proved attractive and efficient platforms for modern biomedicine (including detection, imaging, diagnosis, medication, restoration and regeneration), a particular approach for AD and PD management relies on nanoparticle-based therapy. In this paper we will discuss relevant aspects related to the BBB and its impact on drug-based treatment and emphasize that nanoparticles are suitable and versatile candidates for the development of novel and performance-enhanced nanopharmaceuticals for neurodegenerative conditions therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanocarriers and Targeted Drug Delivery)
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