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Special Issue "Bioactive Plant Compounds for Sustainable Health"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Natália Martins

Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, Portugal
Institute for Research and Innovation in Health (i3S), University of Porto, Portugal
Website | E-Mail
Interests: evidence-based medicine, phytochemistry, phytopharmacology, drug discovery, natural products biochemistry, bioactive molecules, functional foods, nutraceuticals
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Gertjan Van Dijk

Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands
Website | E-Mail
Interests: integrative neurobiology of energy balance; behavioral energetics; functional foods; treatment and prevention of obesity and related cardiometabolic diseases

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The impact of diet on sustainable health and wellbeing of individuals has been studied for many years, and has unravelled a plethora of complex biochemical, metabolic, and physiological mechanisms that underpin this link. In addition to the nutritional aspects of food, it has become clear that food items can contain biologically-active, non-nutritive compounds that provide specific health benefits. These compounds are phytochemicals, which are also sometimes called nutraceuticals. While some of these have made it to become mainstream drugs (e.g., metformin, reserpine), it is believed that the potential for additional candidates is extremely large. In line with these findings, an increasing demand for healthy foods that contain nutraceuticals has been observed, triggering food industry to develop and to restructure its own procedures to fulfil consumers’ desires. It is important to highlight that the definition of “nutraceuticals” is commonly confused with that of “functional foods”, as the latter category also encompasses "designer foods", which are food products formulated with higher (than natural) levels of certain bioactive compounds. Clearly it is important not only to deepen knowledge in this field, but also to clarify the existing one. Furthermore, there is a need for better understanding how bioactive ingredients in food exert their effects and to determine the specific modes of action, as also to deepen knowledge and to discover upcoming plant-food promissory matrices, always ensuring consumers’ safety by producing high quality health-promoting foods. In this Special Issue, we invite authors to submit papers/reviews in which they comment on existing food ingredients with bioactive properties, and/or to provide perspectives on novel candidates.

Dr. Natália Martins
Prof. Dr. Gertjan van Dijk
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access bimonthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • Bioactive molecules
  • Nutraceuticals
  • Functional foods
  • Sustainable Health
  • Wellbeing
  • Longevity

Published Papers (12 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Phytochemical Characterization and Evaluation of the Antimicrobial, Antiproliferative and Pro-Apoptotic Potential of Ephedra alata Decne. Hydroalcoholic Extract against the MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cell Line
Received: 21 November 2018 / Revised: 12 December 2018 / Accepted: 19 December 2018 / Published: 20 December 2018
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Abstract
Ephedra alata Decne. belongs to the Ephedraceae family. It is a species of Ephedra that grows mostly in the desert. Today, the main importance of Ephedra species in the medical field is due to the presence of the alkaloids derived from phenyl-alanine, which
[...] Read more.
Ephedra alata Decne. belongs to the Ephedraceae family. It is a species of Ephedra that grows mostly in the desert. Today, the main importance of Ephedra species in the medical field is due to the presence of the alkaloids derived from phenyl-alanine, which act on the sympathetic nervous system as a sympathomimetic. The aim of this study was to conduct a phytochemical characterization of the hydroalcoholic extract of the aerial part of Ephedra alata Decne., which is indigenous to Tunis, that involves the total phenolic content, individual phenolic content, and antioxidant activity as well as a biological screening for the evaluation of the antimicrobial, antifungal, antiproliferative, pro-apoptotic, and cytotoxic potential against the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. The results show that the hydroalcoholic extract contains polyphenolic phytocompounds (156.226 ± 0.5 mgGAE/g extract) and elicits antioxidant activity (7453.18 ± 2.5 μmol Trolox/g extract). The extract acted as a bacteriostatic agent against all tested bacterial strains, but was bactericidal only against the Gram-positive cocci and Candida spp. In the set experimental parameters, the extract presents antiproliferative, pro-apoptotic, and cytotoxic potential against the MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Plant Compounds for Sustainable Health)
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Open AccessArticle Schisandra Chinensis Lignans Suppresses the Production of Inflammatory Mediators Regulated by NF-κB, AP-1, and IRF3 in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated RAW264.7 Cells
Molecules 2018, 23(12), 3319; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23123319
Received: 23 November 2018 / Revised: 9 December 2018 / Accepted: 10 December 2018 / Published: 14 December 2018
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Abstract
Schisandra Fructus (SF) is a traditional Chinese herb used in the treatment of inflammatory disorders like hepatitis. One of the main anti-inflammatory components of SF is the lignans. However, the underlying anti-inflammatory mechanism of Schisandra Chinensis lignans (SCL) remains unclear. This study aims
[...] Read more.
Schisandra Fructus (SF) is a traditional Chinese herb used in the treatment of inflammatory disorders like hepatitis. One of the main anti-inflammatory components of SF is the lignans. However, the underlying anti-inflammatory mechanism of Schisandra Chinensis lignans (SCL) remains unclear. This study aims to investigate the effects of SCL on inflammatory mediators in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW264.7 cells and explore the underlying mechanism. The production of nitric oxide (NO) was determined by Griess reaction. ELISA was used to determine cytokine levels and chemokines secretion. To estimate protein levels and enzyme activities, we employed Western blotting. Nuclear localization of NF-κB, AP-1, and IRF3 was detected using immunofluorescence analyses. The results showed that SCL significantly reduced the release of inflammatory mediators, including NO and PGE2, which may be related to down-regulation of iNOS and COX-2 expression. The production of cytokines and chemokines was suppressed by SCL treatment. SCL also decreased the phosphorylation of IKKα/β, IκB-α, Akt, TBK1, ERK, p38, JNK, NF-κB (p65), AP-1 (c-Jun), and IRF3 in RAW264.7 macrophages activated with LPS. The nuclear protein levels and nuclear translocation of AP-1, NF-κB and IRF3 were suppressed by SCL. These results indicated that SCL suppressed the IKKα/β/NF-κB, MAPKs/AP-1 and TBK1/IRF3 signaling pathways in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Plant Compounds for Sustainable Health)
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Open AccessArticle Bioactive Compounds and Volatile Profiles of Five Transylvanian Wild Edible Mushrooms
Molecules 2018, 23(12), 3272; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23123272
Received: 20 November 2018 / Revised: 3 December 2018 / Accepted: 9 December 2018 / Published: 11 December 2018
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Abstract
This study aimed to determine the chemical composition, fatty acids, volatile profile and phenolic compounds profiles from five wild edible mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus, Pleurotus ostreatus, Cantharellus cibarius, Boletus edulis, Lactarius piperatus) from Romania. The results indicated that the dried fruiting bodies
[...] Read more.
This study aimed to determine the chemical composition, fatty acids, volatile profile and phenolic compounds profiles from five wild edible mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus, Pleurotus ostreatus, Cantharellus cibarius, Boletus edulis, Lactarius piperatus) from Romania. The results indicated that the dried fruiting bodies of selected mushrooms were rich in proteins (36.24 g/100 g dw-Boletus edulis) and carbohydrates (62.45 g/100 g dw-Lactarius piperatus). 4-Hydroxybenzoic acid and cinnamic acid, were the main phenolic compound present in all selected species. Additionally, the fatty acid pattern included polyunsaturated acids in more than 60% of all fatty acids followed by monounsaturated fatty acids (30%). For the studied mushroom samples, the main volatile compounds identified by the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were hexanal, benzaldehyde and dodecanoic acid. According to the obtained results, the fruiting bodies of selected Romanian mushrooms are a rich source of bioactive molecules indicating that they may be further exploited as functional ingredients in the composition of innovative food products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Plant Compounds for Sustainable Health)
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Open AccessArticle Modulation of Gut Microbiota by Lonicera caerulea L. Berry Polyphenols in a Mouse Model of Fatty Liver Induced by High Fat Diet
Molecules 2018, 23(12), 3213; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23123213
Received: 30 October 2018 / Revised: 20 November 2018 / Accepted: 27 November 2018 / Published: 5 December 2018
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Abstract
Polyphenols from the Lonicera caerulea L. berry have shown protective effects on experimental non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in our previous studies. As endotoxins from gut bacteria are considered to be the major trigger of inflammation in NAFLD, this study aims to clarify
[...] Read more.
Polyphenols from the Lonicera caerulea L. berry have shown protective effects on experimental non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in our previous studies. As endotoxins from gut bacteria are considered to be the major trigger of inflammation in NAFLD, this study aims to clarify the regulatory effects of L. caerulea L. berry polyphenols (LCBP) on gut microbiota in a high fat diet (HFD)-induced mouse model. C57BL/6N mice were fed with a normal diet, HFD, or HFD containing 0.5–1% of LCBP for 45 days. The results revealed that supplementation with LCBP decreased significantly the levels of IL-2, IL-6, MCP-1, and TNF-α in serum, as well as endotoxin levels in both serum and liver in HFD-fed mice. Fecal microbiota characterization by high throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that a HFD increased the Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio, and LCBP reduced this ratio by increasing the relative abundance of Bacteroides, Parabacteroides, and another two undefined bacterial genera belonging to the order of Bacteroidales and family of Rikenellaceae, and also by decreasing the relative abundance of six bacterial genera belonging to the phylum Firmicutes, including Staphylococcus, Lactobacillus, Ruminococcus, and Oscillospira. These data demonstrated that LCBP potentially attenuated inflammation in NAFLD through modulation of gut microbiota, especially the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Plant Compounds for Sustainable Health)
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Open AccessArticle In Vitro Antioxidant and Anti-Propionibacterium acnes Activities of Cold Water, Hot Water, and Methanol Extracts, and Their Respective Ethyl Acetate Fractions, from Sanguisorba officinalis L. Roots
Molecules 2018, 23(11), 3001; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23113001
Received: 5 November 2018 / Revised: 13 November 2018 / Accepted: 14 November 2018 / Published: 16 November 2018
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Abstract
Identification of medicinal plants and naturally derived compounds as new natural antioxidant and antibacterial sources for topical acne treatment has long been important. To determine anti-Propionibacterium acnes activity and in vitro antioxidant activities, Sanguisorba officinalis L. root (SOR) was extracted with cold
[...] Read more.
Identification of medicinal plants and naturally derived compounds as new natural antioxidant and antibacterial sources for topical acne treatment has long been important. To determine anti-Propionibacterium acnes activity and in vitro antioxidant activities, Sanguisorba officinalis L. root (SOR) was extracted with cold water (CWE), hot water (HWE), and methanol (ME), and each extract was fractionated successively with hexane, ethyl acetate (EA), and butanol to determine whether the activities could be attributed to the total phenolic, flavonoid, terpenoid, and condensed tannin contents. Pearson’s correlation coefficients were analyzed between the respective variables. The SOR CWE, HWE, ME, and their respective EA fractions showed anti-P. acnes activity based on the paper disc diffusion method on agar plates, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC). The MIC against P. acnes had a moderate (+) correlation with the total phenolic content, but not with the other measures. The 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging capacity (SC) had a strong (–) correlation with the total phenolic content and a moderate (–) correlation with the total flavonoid content. The total antioxidant capacity had a strong (+) correlation with the condensed tannin content. Linoleic acid peroxidation inhibition had a strong (–) correlation with the total phenolic content. To elucidate the major active phytochemicals in the CWE-EA, HWE-EA, and ME-EA fractions, high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet (HPLC-UV) and ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with hybrid triple quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF-MS) were performed. The HPLC-UV analysis showed the presence of nine compounds in common (arjunic acid and/or euscaphic acid, gallic acid, kaempferol, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, tannic acid, and coumarin, quercetin). The UHPLC-QTOF-MS analysis showed the presence of nine compounds in common (gallic acid; caffeic acid; umbelliferone; arjunic acid, euscaphic acid, and/or tormentic acid; pomolic acid; rosamultic acid; and benzoic acid). When standards of the identified phytochemicals were tested against the same bacterium, quercetin, coumarin, and euscaphic acid showed antibacterial activity against P. acnes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Plant Compounds for Sustainable Health)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Highly Cancer Selective Antiproliferative Activity of Natural Prenylated Flavonoids
Molecules 2018, 23(11), 2922; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23112922
Received: 26 September 2018 / Revised: 31 October 2018 / Accepted: 8 November 2018 / Published: 9 November 2018
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Abstract
Xanthohumol (XN) and four minor hops prenylflavonoids: α,β-dihydroxanthohumol (2HXN), isoxanthohumol (IXN), 8-prenylnaringenin (8PN), and 6-prenylnaringenin (6PN), were tested for antiproliferative activity towards human cancer and normal cell lines. Nonprenylated naringenin (NG) was used as a model compound. Xanthohumol, α,β-dihydroxanthohumol and 6-prenylnaringenin were the
[...] Read more.
Xanthohumol (XN) and four minor hops prenylflavonoids: α,β-dihydroxanthohumol (2HXN), isoxanthohumol (IXN), 8-prenylnaringenin (8PN), and 6-prenylnaringenin (6PN), were tested for antiproliferative activity towards human cancer and normal cell lines. Nonprenylated naringenin (NG) was used as a model compound. Xanthohumol, α,β-dihydroxanthohumol and 6-prenylnaringenin were the most active compounds. Xanthohumol exhibited higher antiproliferative activity than cisplatin (CP) against five cancer cell lines: ovarian resistant to cisplatin A2780cis, breast MDA-MB-231 and T-47D, prostate PC-3, and colon HT-29. Isoxanthohumol was more potent than cisplatin against breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and T-47D whereas 6-prenylnaringenin was stronger than cisplatin against breast cancer cell line T-47D. It was found that tested chalcones possessed highly selective antiproliferative activity towards all tested breast cancer lines compared to the normal breast MCF 10A cell line (the calculated selectivity index ranged from 5 to 10). Low antiproliferative activity of naringenin indicates the importance of the prenyl group with respect to antiproliferative activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Plant Compounds for Sustainable Health)
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Open AccessArticle Comparison of Single and Combined Use of Catechin, Protocatechuic, and Vanillic Acids as Antioxidant and Antibacterial Agents against Uropathogenic Escherichia Coli at Planktonic and Biofilm Levels
Molecules 2018, 23(11), 2813; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23112813
Received: 27 September 2018 / Revised: 22 October 2018 / Accepted: 26 October 2018 / Published: 30 October 2018
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Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of combining catechin, protocatechuic, and vanillic acids against planktonic growing, adhesion, and biofilm eradication of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), as well as antioxidant agents. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of protocatechuic, vanillic acids
[...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of combining catechin, protocatechuic, and vanillic acids against planktonic growing, adhesion, and biofilm eradication of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), as well as antioxidant agents. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of protocatechuic, vanillic acids and catechin against the growth of planktonic bacteria were 12.98, 11.80, and 13.78 mM, respectively. Mixing 1.62 mM protocatechuic acid + 0.74 mM vanillic acid + 0.05 mM catechin resulted in a synergistic effect acting as an MIC. Similarly, the minimum concentrations of phenolic compounds to prevent UPEC adhesion and biofilm formation (MBIC) were 11.03 and 7.13 mM of protocatechuic and vanillic acids, respectively, whereas no MBIC of catechin was found. However, combinations of 1.62 mM protocatechuic acid + 0.74 mM vanillic acid + 0.05 mM catechin showed a synergistic effect acting as MBIC. On the other hand, the minimum concentrations to eradicate biofilms (MBEC) were 25.95 and 23.78 mM, respectively. The combination of 3.20 mM protocatechuic acid, 2.97 mM vanillic acid, and 1.72 mM catechin eradicated pre-formed biofilms. The antioxidant capacity of the combination of phenolics was higher than the expected theoretical values, indicating synergism by the DPPH, ABTS, and FRAP assays. Effective concentrations of catechin, protocatechuic, and vanillic acids were reduced from 8 to 1378 times when combined. In contrast, the antibiotic nitrofurantoin was not effective in eradicating biofilms from silicone surfaces. In conclusion, the mixture of phenolic compounds was more effective in preventing cell adhesion and eradicating pre-formed biofilms of uropathogenic E. coli than single compounds and nitrofurantoin, and showed antioxidant synergy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Plant Compounds for Sustainable Health)
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Open AccessArticle In Vitro Ecological Response of the Human Gut Microbiome to Bioactive Extracts from Edible Wild Mushrooms
Molecules 2018, 23(9), 2128; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23092128
Received: 11 July 2018 / Revised: 17 August 2018 / Accepted: 22 August 2018 / Published: 23 August 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1057 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study presents the effect of two new products based on atomized extracts from edible wild mushrooms (RoBioMush1, RoBioMush2) on the microbiota of three target groups: clinically healthy (NG) individuals, individuals with nutritional disorders (ND), and individuals with cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The microbiota
[...] Read more.
This study presents the effect of two new products based on atomized extracts from edible wild mushrooms (RoBioMush1, RoBioMush2) on the microbiota of three target groups: clinically healthy (NG) individuals, individuals with nutritional disorders (ND), and individuals with cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The microbiota fingerprints were determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Modulations in the simulated microbiome were established and correlated with the presence of phenolic compounds released in the in vitro environment (a three-stage culture system GIS2 simulator, www.gissystems.ro). The high metabolizing capacity of NG and CVD correlated positively with the rest of the biological activities expressed in vitro. ND microbiota consumed a wide spectrum of monosaccharides from the products. Xylose was present in large quantities in the descending segment (minimum: 175 μg/mL for ND). The primary conclusion was that the microbiological ecosystem was modulated, as proven by the presence of specific biomarkers (e.g., ammonium levels and fingerprints of short-chain fatty acids–SCFAs), which stimulate the organism’s health status and were correlated with the restoration of a normal microbiota fingerprint. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Plant Compounds for Sustainable Health)
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Open AccessArticle Effect of Different Anthocyanidin Glucosides on Lutein Uptake by Caco-2 Cells, and Their Combined Activities on Anti-Oxidation and Anti-Inflammation In Vitro and Ex Vivo
Molecules 2018, 23(8), 2035; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23082035
Received: 23 July 2018 / Revised: 6 August 2018 / Accepted: 11 August 2018 / Published: 14 August 2018
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Abstract
The interactive effects on anti-oxidation and anti-inflammation of lutein combined with each of the six common anthocyanidin glucosides were studied in both chemical and cellular systems. The combined phytochemicals showed an antagonism in the inhibition of lipid oxidation in a liposomal membrane, but
[...] Read more.
The interactive effects on anti-oxidation and anti-inflammation of lutein combined with each of the six common anthocyanidin glucosides were studied in both chemical and cellular systems. The combined phytochemicals showed an antagonism in the inhibition of lipid oxidation in a liposomal membrane, but showed an additive effect on cellular antioxidant activity in Caco-2 cells. Lutein was an active lipoxygenase inhibitor at 2–12 μM while anthocyanins were inactive. The concentration of lutein when it was used in combination with anthocyanins was 25–54% higher than when lutein was used alone (i.e., IC50 = 1.2 μM) to induce 50% of lipoxygenase inhibition. Only the combination of lutein with malvidin-3-glucoside showed anti-inflammatory synergy in the suppression of interleukin-8, and the synergy was seen at all three ratios tested. Some mixtures, however, showed anti-inflammatory antagonism. The presence of anthocyanins (5–7.5 μM) did not affect lutein uptake (2.5–5 μM) by Caco-2 cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Plant Compounds for Sustainable Health)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Mediterranean Wild Edible Plants: Weeds or “New Functional Crops”?
Molecules 2018, 23(9), 2299; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23092299
Received: 30 July 2018 / Revised: 3 September 2018 / Accepted: 5 September 2018 / Published: 8 September 2018
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Abstract
The Mediterranean basin is a biodiversity hotspot of wild edible species, and their therapeutic and culinary uses have long been documented. Owing to the growing demand for wild edible species, there are increasing concerns about the safety, standardization, quality, and availability of products
[...] Read more.
The Mediterranean basin is a biodiversity hotspot of wild edible species, and their therapeutic and culinary uses have long been documented. Owing to the growing demand for wild edible species, there are increasing concerns about the safety, standardization, quality, and availability of products derived from these species collected in the wild. An efficient cultivation method for the species having promising nutraceutical values is highly desirable. In this backdrop, a hydroponic system could be considered as a reproducible and efficient agronomic practice to maximize yield, and also to selectively stimulate the biosynthesis of targeted metabolites. The aim of this report is to review the phytochemical and toxic compounds of some potentially interesting Mediterranean wild edible species. Herein, after a deep analysis of the literature, information on the main bioactive compounds, and some possibly toxic molecules, from fifteen wild edible species have been compiled. The traditional recipes prepared with these species are also listed. In addition, preliminary data about the performance of some selected species are also reported. In particular, germination tests performed on six selected species revealed that there are differences among the species, but not with crop species. “Domestication” of wild species seems a promising approach for exploiting these “new functional foods”. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Plant Compounds for Sustainable Health)
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Antiulcer Agents: From Plant Extracts to Phytochemicals in Healing Promotion
Molecules 2018, 23(7), 1751; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23071751
Received: 30 June 2018 / Revised: 12 July 2018 / Accepted: 14 July 2018 / Published: 17 July 2018
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (614 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this narrative review, we have comprehensively reviewed the plant sources used as antiulcer agents. From traditional uses as herbal remedies, we have moved on to preclinical evidence, critically discussing the in vitro and in vivo studies focusing on plant extracts and even
[...] Read more.
In this narrative review, we have comprehensively reviewed the plant sources used as antiulcer agents. From traditional uses as herbal remedies, we have moved on to preclinical evidence, critically discussing the in vitro and in vivo studies focusing on plant extracts and even isolated phytochemicals with antiulcerogenic potential. A particular emphasis was also paid to Helicobacter pylori activity, with emphasis on involved mechanisms of action. Lastly, the issue of safety profile of these plant products has also been addressed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Plant Compounds for Sustainable Health)
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Other

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Open AccessPerspective Abelmoschus esculentus (L.): Bioactive Components’ Beneficial Properties—Focused on Antidiabetic Role—For Sustainable Health Applications
Received: 31 October 2018 / Revised: 17 December 2018 / Accepted: 19 December 2018 / Published: 21 December 2018
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Abstract
The main features of the okra, Abelmoschus esculentus (L.), are highlighted. The evaluation of interactions between biologically active compounds and other components of the food matrix can be considered as the first action in the investigation of potential benefits of this annual herb.
[...] Read more.
The main features of the okra, Abelmoschus esculentus (L.), are highlighted. The evaluation of interactions between biologically active compounds and other components of the food matrix can be considered as the first action in the investigation of potential benefits of this annual herb. Moreover, updated examples of current and innovative directions in an integrated and multidisciplinary approach are discussed, with particular attention to chemometrics. Among the main effects attributed to okra, its antidiabetic property is the focus. Finally, the use of okra in different fields will be discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Plant Compounds for Sustainable Health)
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