Special Issue "Micro and Nano Devices for Cell Analysis"

A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X). This special issue belongs to the section "B:Biology and Biomedicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Shohei Yamamura
Website
Guest Editor
Health Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2217-14 Hayashi-cho, Takamatsu, Japan
Interests: cell chip; single-cell analysis; biochip; biosensor; cancer

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, miniaturized systems (micro and nanodevices) called a lab-on-a-chip or micro-total analysis system (µ-TAS) have received focus as new systems for chemical and biochemical analyses. These devices are expected to perform DNA, protein, and cell analysis for drug screening and development of novel therapies. Especially micro and nanodevice technologies are expected to perform accurate and high-throughput analysis for the functions and characteristics of cells at single-cell or single-molecule levels. The developments of these micro and nanodevices for cell analysis (cell chips) could lead to the next technology of drug screening, diagnosis, and therapies. The history of cell chip devices began with cell and microorganism immobilization and patterning technology. Recently, cell separation, cell manipulation, cell culture, cell lysis, and gene amplification from cells (e.g., PCR) have been performed on various types of devices. Accordingly, this Special Issue seeks to showcase research papers that focus on novel devices or methodological developments of cell-based assay or cell-related (cell-derived materials) analyses. Contributions related to the technologies, materials, and processes of various assays (e.g., observation, manipulation, detection, and analysis) for cells (especially single cells), and, eventually, applications are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Shohei Yamamura
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Micromachines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Micro and nanotechnology
  • Cell chip
  • Single-cell analysis
  • Cell-based assay
  • High-throughput screening
  • Diagnosis
  • Biochip
  • Biosensor
  • Microchip
  • Nanodevice
  • Microarray
  • Microfluidic device
  • Nanomaterial

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Simultaneously Quantifying Both Young’s Modulus and Specific Membrane Capacitance of Bladder Cancer Cells with Different Metastatic Potential
Micromachines 2020, 11(3), 249; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi11030249 - 27 Feb 2020
Abstract
Both Young’s modulus and specific membrane capacitance (SMC) are two important physical parameters for characterizing cell status. In this paper, we utilized a thin-neck-micropipette aspiration system to simultaneously quantify Young’s modulus and SMC value of six types of cell lines in different progression [...] Read more.
Both Young’s modulus and specific membrane capacitance (SMC) are two important physical parameters for characterizing cell status. In this paper, we utilized a thin-neck-micropipette aspiration system to simultaneously quantify Young’s modulus and SMC value of six types of cell lines in different progression grades, which include four grades from the lowest metastatic potential G1 to the highest potential G4. We investigated how these two physical properties possess heterogeneities in bladder cancer cells with different grades and what roles they might play in grading bladder cancer. The characterization results of these cells of different cancer grades is linearly correlated with the cancer grades, showing that the Young’s modulus is negatively linearly correlated with bladder cancer grades, while SMC shows a positive linear correlation. Furthermore, the combination of these two physical properties on a scatter diagram clearly shows the cell groups with different cancer grades, which means that this combination could be a potential tumor grading marker to identify cancer cells with different metastatic potential. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Micro and Nano Devices for Cell Analysis)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Single Cell Analysis of Neutrophils NETs by Microscopic LSPR Imaging System
Micromachines 2020, 11(1), 52; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi11010052 - 31 Dec 2019
Abstract
A simple microengraving cell monitoring method for neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) released from single neutrophils has been realized using a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microwell array (MWA) sheet on a plasmon chip platform. An imbalance between NETs formation and the succeeding degradation (NETosis) are considered [...] Read more.
A simple microengraving cell monitoring method for neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) released from single neutrophils has been realized using a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microwell array (MWA) sheet on a plasmon chip platform. An imbalance between NETs formation and the succeeding degradation (NETosis) are considered associated with autoimmune disease and its pathogenesis. Thus, an alternative platform that can conduct monitoring of this activity on single cell level at minimum cost but with great sensitivity is greatly desired. The developed MWA plasmon chips allow single cell isolation of neutrophils from 150 µL suspension (6.0 × 105 cells/mL) with an efficiency of 36.3%; 105 microwells with single cell condition. To demonstrate the utility of the chip, trapped cells were incubated between 2 to 4 h after introducing with 100 nM phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) before measurement. Under observation using a hyperspectral imaging system that allows high-throughput screening, the neutrophils stimulated by PMA solution show a significant release of fibrils and NETs after 4 h, with observed maximum areas between 314–758 µm2. An average absorption peak wavelength shows a redshift of Δλ = 1.5 nm as neutrophils release NETs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Micro and Nano Devices for Cell Analysis)
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Open AccessArticle
Mechanical Property Changes in Breast Cancer Cells Induced by Stimulation with Macrophage Secretions in Vitro
Micromachines 2019, 10(11), 738; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi10110738 - 30 Oct 2019
Abstract
The contribution of secretions from tumor-associated macrophage (TAM)-like cells to the stimulation of mechanical property changes in murine breast cancer cells was studied using an in vitro model system. A murine breast cancer cell line (FP10SC2) was stimulated by adding macrophage (J774.2) cultivation [...] Read more.
The contribution of secretions from tumor-associated macrophage (TAM)-like cells to the stimulation of mechanical property changes in murine breast cancer cells was studied using an in vitro model system. A murine breast cancer cell line (FP10SC2) was stimulated by adding macrophage (J774.2) cultivation medium containing stimulation molecules secreted from the macrophages, and changes in mechanical properties were compared before and after stimulation. As a result, cell elasticity decreased, degradation ability of the extracellular matrix increased, and the expression of plakoglobin was upregulated. These results indicate that cancer cell malignancy is upregulated by this stimulation. Moreover, changes in intercellular adhesion strengths between pairs of cancer cells were measured before and after stimulation using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The maximum force required to separate cells was increased by stimulation with the secreted factors. These results indicate the possibility that TAMs cause changes in the mechanical properties of cancer cells in tumor microenvironments, and in vitro measurements of mechanical property changes in cancer cells will be useful to study interactions between cells in tumor microenvironments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Micro and Nano Devices for Cell Analysis)
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Review

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Recent Advances in Electrochemiluminescence-Based Systems for Mammalian Cell Analysis
Micromachines 2020, 11(5), 530; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi11050530 - 22 May 2020
Abstract
Mammalian cell analysis is essential in the context of both fundamental studies and clinical applications. Among the various techniques available for cell analysis, electrochemiluminescence (ECL) has attracted significant attention due to its integration of both electrochemical and spectroscopic methods. In this review, we [...] Read more.
Mammalian cell analysis is essential in the context of both fundamental studies and clinical applications. Among the various techniques available for cell analysis, electrochemiluminescence (ECL) has attracted significant attention due to its integration of both electrochemical and spectroscopic methods. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the ECL-based systems developed for mammalian cell analysis. The review begins with a summary of the developments in luminophores that opened the door to ECL applications for biological samples. Secondly, ECL-based imaging systems are introduced as an emerging technique to visualize single-cell morphologies and intracellular molecules. In the subsequent section, the ECL sensors developed in the past decade are summarized, the use of which made the highly sensitive detection of cell-derived molecules possible. Although ECL immunoassays are well developed in terms of commercial use, the sensing of biomolecules at a single-cell level remains a challenge. Emphasis is therefore placed on ECL sensors that directly detect cellular molecules from small portions of cells or even single cells. Finally, the development of bipolar electrode devices for ECL cell assays is introduced. To conclude, the direction of research in this field and its application prospects are described. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Micro and Nano Devices for Cell Analysis)
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