Special Issue "Orthodontic Materials and Adhesive Interfaces"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 February 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Maria Francesca Sfondrini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Unit of Orthodontics and Paediatric Dentistry – Section of Dentistry - Department of Clinical, Surgical, Diagnostic and Paediatric Sciences – University of Pavia – Italy
Interests: orthodontics; adhesive dentistry; craniofacial growth
Dr. Andrea Scribante
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Unit of Orthodontics and Paediatric Dentistry – Section of Dentistry - Department of Clinical, Surgical, Diagnostic and Paediatric Sciences – University of Pavia – Italy
Interests: orthodontics; adhesive dentistry; dental materials
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Orthodontics is a specialty of dentistry that studies the diagnosis, prevention, and correction of malpositioned jaws and teeth. Orthodontic fixed therapy moves the patient’s teeth, usually with brackets and wires. During orthodontic treatment, bonding between the bracket and the enamel has to be strong enough to withstand masticatory stresses and shear forces. Bracket failure is a common problem in orthodontics that is disturbing for both the clinicians and patients. Moreover, bond failures can influence treatment duration, total costs, and chair time. Unwanted bracket detachment can be due to bracket base characteristics, masticatory forces, bonding technique, or enamel contamination.

As the current technologic improvements face clinicians with new materials and techniques, adhesive properties should be continuously studied and tested. In vivo and in vitro investigations could help orthodontists to increase their knowledge about material behaviour.

Materials is preparing a Special Issue focused on Orthodontic Materials and Adhesive Interfaces.

We kindly invite researchers, investigators, and clinicians to contribute with original research articles as well as in vitro studies, reviews, clinical trials, and case reports that could improve the understanding of bonding mechanism, interactions, and the development of strategies to enhance bond strength.

Manuscripts investigating adhesion in the orthodontic field will be considered for publication in the Issue. Possible research topics include but are not limited to:

-adhesives

-bonding techniques

-enamel contaminants

-bracket base designs

-interface characteristics and other connected variables.

Before submission, authors should carefully read over the journal's Author Guidelines.

Prof. Maria Francesca Sfondrini
Dr. Andrea Scribante
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • adhesive
  • bond
  • bracket
  • dentistry
  • orthodontics
  • shear
  • strength

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
“In Vitro” Study About Variables that Influence in Arch Friction with Conventional and Self-Ligating Brackets
Materials 2019, 12(20), 3279; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12203279 - 09 Oct 2019
Abstract
Many advantages have been described surrounding self-ligating (SL) brackets compared to metallic conventional ligating (CL) brackets, such as: Less total treatment time, alignment efficiency, patient comfort, plaque retention, and low friction. The objective of this in vitro simulation was to know the variables [...] Read more.
Many advantages have been described surrounding self-ligating (SL) brackets compared to metallic conventional ligating (CL) brackets, such as: Less total treatment time, alignment efficiency, patient comfort, plaque retention, and low friction. The objective of this in vitro simulation was to know the variables that affect arch displacement in CL and SL brackets—active (ASL) and passive (PSL)—and analyze if static friction values are affected by bracket design, arch wire section, kind of ligature, and use of a friction reducer agent (FRA) in a wet state. Larger values of static friction were found in CL with metallic ligature (ML) (8.01 ± 1.08 N/mm) and elastic ligature (EL) (6.96 ± 0.48 N/mm). Lower values were found in PSL brackets combined with FRA (0.58 ± 0.21 N/mm). The study was carried out using different stereographical models of a maxillary upper right quadrant with canine, first and second premolar, and first molar bonded brackets. A section of 25 mm of 0.019 × 0.025” stainless steel arch with a rectangular section (SS) and hybrid section (HY) was inserted into the different bracket models. Static friction values were collected using a universal test machine in wet conditions and testing the effect of a friction reducer agent (FRA). To assure the reliability of the study, different wire combinations were repeated after two weeks by the same operator and a linear analysis of regression was done. Each bracket model analysis—with the different wires, use of the FRA, and comparison among brackets in similar conditions—was done using an ANOVA test with a confidence interval of 95% and comparative Post-Hoc tests (LSD). In this in vitro simulation we found higher static friction values in CL compared to ASL and PSL. In PSL, lower values were achieved. CL brackets using ML showed the highest static friction values with a great variability. In this setting, the use of HY wires did not reduce static friction values in ASL and PSL, while in CL brackets with EL friction the values were reduced significantly. An FRA combined with ASL reduced significantly static friction values but not with PSL. In the case of CL, the FRA effect was higher with SS and better than with HY wires. ML values were similar to ASL static friction. The direct extrapolation of the results might be inaccurate, since all these findings should be tested clinically to be validated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Orthodontic Materials and Adhesive Interfaces)
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Open AccessArticle
Shear Bonding Strength and Thermal Cycling Effect of Fluoride Releasable/Rechargeable Orthodontic Adhesive Resins Containing LiAl-F Layered Double Hydroxide (LDH) Filler
Materials 2019, 12(19), 3204; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12193204 - 30 Sep 2019
Abstract
This study aims to investigate the shear bonding strength (SBS) and thermal cycling effect of orthodontic brackets bonded with fluoride release/rechargeable LiAl-F layered double hydroxide (LDH-F) contained dental orthodontic resin. 3% and 5% of LDH-F nanopowder were gently mixed to commercial resin-based adhesives [...] Read more.
This study aims to investigate the shear bonding strength (SBS) and thermal cycling effect of orthodontic brackets bonded with fluoride release/rechargeable LiAl-F layered double hydroxide (LDH-F) contained dental orthodontic resin. 3% and 5% of LDH-F nanopowder were gently mixed to commercial resin-based adhesives Orthomite LC (LC, LC3, LC5) and Transbond XT (XT, XT3). A fluoroaluminosilicate modified resin adhesive Transbond color change (TC) was selected as a positive control. Fifteen brackets each group were bonded to bovine enamel and the SBS was tested with/without thermal cycling. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was evaluated at 20× magnification. The fluoride-releasing/rechargeability and cytocompatibility were also evaluated. The SBS of LC, LC3, and LC5 were significantly higher than XT and TC. After thermal cycling, the SBS of LC, LC3, and LC5 did not decrease and was significantly higher than TC. The changes of ARI scores indicate that failure occurred not only cohesive but also semi-cohesive fracture. The 30 days accumulated daily fluoride release of LC3, LC5, and TC without recharge are higher than 300 μg/cm2. The LDH-F contained resin adhesive possesses higher SBS compared to positive control TC. Fluoride release and the rechargeable feature can be achieved for preventing enamel demineralization without cytotoxicity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Orthodontic Materials and Adhesive Interfaces)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Antibacterial and Remineralizing Fillers in Experimental Orthodontic Adhesives
Materials 2019, 12(4), 652; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12040652 - 21 Feb 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Orthodontic adhesives with antimicrobial and remineralizing properties may be an alternative to control white spot lesions around brackets. The aim of this study is to develop an experimental orthodontic adhesive containing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT) and alkyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (ATAB). Methacrylate (BisGMA [...] Read more.
Orthodontic adhesives with antimicrobial and remineralizing properties may be an alternative to control white spot lesions around brackets. The aim of this study is to develop an experimental orthodontic adhesive containing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT) and alkyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (ATAB). Methacrylate (BisGMA and TEGDMA) monomers were used to formulate the adhesives. Four experimental groups were produced with the addition of 0.1 wt.% BNNT (GBNNT); 0.1 wt.% ATAB (GATAB); and 0.2 wt.% BNNT with ATAB (GBNNT/ATAB); in the control group, no fillers were added (GCtrl). The degree of conversion, cytotoxicity, softening in solvent, contact angle and free surface energy, antibacterial activity, shear bond strength, and mineral deposition were evaluated. Adhesives achieved degree of conversion higher than 50% and cell viability higher than 90%. GBNNT and GATAB adhesives exhibited reduced softening in solvent. Mean free surface energy was decreased in the GBNNT adhesive. Significant reduction in bacterial growth was observed in the GBNNT/ATAB. No statistical difference was found for shear bond strength. Mineral deposition was found in GBNNT, GATAB, and GBNNT/ATAB groups after 14 and 28 days. The addition of 0.2% BNNT/ATAB to an experimental orthodontic adhesive inhibited bacterial growth and induced mineral deposition without affecting the properties of the material. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Orthodontic Materials and Adhesive Interfaces)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Creep, Hardness, and Elastic Modulus of Lingual Fixed Retainer Adhesives
Materials 2019, 12(4), 646; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12040646 - 21 Feb 2019
Abstract
The aims of this study were twofold: a) to characterize a wide array of time-independent and -dependent properties and b) to find possible correlations among the properties tested. Seven commercially available orthodontic adhesives were included in this study and ten cylindrical specimens were [...] Read more.
The aims of this study were twofold: a) to characterize a wide array of time-independent and -dependent properties and b) to find possible correlations among the properties tested. Seven commercially available orthodontic adhesives were included in this study and ten cylindrical specimens were prepared from each material. Five specimens from each material were used for the characterization of Martens Hardness (HM), indentation modulus (EIT), and elastic index (ηIT), and the remaining five for the determination of indentation creep (CIT). Al the aforementioned properties were identified by employing an Instrumented Indentations Testing (IIT) device with a Vickers indenter. The results of HM, EIT, ηIT, and CIT were statistically analyzed by one way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test, while the possible correlations among the aforementioned properties were determined by Spearman correlation test. Statistical significant differences were identified for all properties among the materials tested. Spearman correlation reveals that HM has a positive correlation with EIT. Both properties demonstrated a negative correlation with ηIT and CIT, while no correlation was identified between ηIT and CIT. Significant differences in the mechanical properties tested may also imply differences in their clinical behavior and efficacy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Orthodontic Materials and Adhesive Interfaces)
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