Special Issue "Advanced Restorative and Dental Materials: Biological, Physical, and Chemical Properties"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Claudio Poggio
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Clinical, Surgical, Diagnostic and Paediatric Sciences - Section of Dentistry, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy
Interests: restorative dentistry; endodontics; dental materials
Prof. Dr. Andrea Scribante
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Clinical, Surgical, Diagnostic and Paediatric Sciences, Section of Dentistry, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy
Interests: orthodontics; dental materials; adhesion; bond strength
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Dentistry is one of the medical sciences most related to materials. The efficacy of treatments like bleaching, direct and indirect restorations, endodontics, as well as the application of mobile and fixed prostheses, dental implants, or orthodontic appliances is strictly determined by the properties of the used materials. Despite the fact that many of these treaments, although historical, still maintain validity, an increasing number of new proposals have been introduced in recent years. This development was favoured by the introduction of advanced techniques in dentistry, such as nanotechnologies or CAD/CAM.

However, clinicians should consider the specific properties of these new materials to make the best choice for their patients. In particular, biocompatibility is a key point because each material must be tolerated by the human organism. Furthermore, the discussion of the possible bacterial colonisation of their surface is equally important, considering its aetiopathogenetic role in decay, periodontitis, and peri-implantitis.

Finally, physical and chemical properties must also be taken into account to ensure high-resistant treatments, as well as the maintenance of the initial characteristics of the products, preventing alteration of their original validity.

The aim of this Special Issue is to present the latest developments in the field of dental materials. It is our pleasure to invite you to contribute to this Special Issue. Research articles, review articles, and communications are all welcome.

Prof. Claudio Poggio
Prof. Andrea Scribante
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • glass ionomer cements
  • composite resins
  • universal adhesives
  • bleaching agents
  • aesthetic restorative materials
  • CAD/CAM dental materials

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Influence of Different Surface Pretreatments on Shear Bond Strength of an Adhesive Resin Cement to Various Zirconia Ceramics
Materials 2020, 13(3), 652; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13030652 - 01 Feb 2020
Abstract
The aim of this in vitro study was to assess the influence of surface pretreatment on shear bond strength (SBS) of an adhesive resin cement (G-CEM Link Force TM, GC Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) to three different yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) ceramics: (1) [...] Read more.
The aim of this in vitro study was to assess the influence of surface pretreatment on shear bond strength (SBS) of an adhesive resin cement (G-CEM Link Force TM, GC Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) to three different yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) ceramics: (1) Copran Zirconia Monolith HT, COP; (2) Katana ML Zirconia, KAT; and (3) Metoxit Z-CAD HTL Zirconia, MET. In total, 45 cylinders (5 mm in diameter, 1 mm height) for each type of zirconia ceramic were prepared used a computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) machine (software CEREC 4.2). Each type of zirconia was subdivided into three groups and each group received a different surface pretreatment; 15 samples were not conditioned as control (groups COP 1, KAT 1, MET 1), 15 samples were air-borne particle abraded with aluminum dioxide particles of 50-μm size at 0.3 MPa for 20 s (groups COP 2, KAT 2, MET 2), and 15 samples were hot-etched with a solution of hydrochloric acid and ferric chloride (groups COP 3, KAT 3, MET 3). After specimen fabrication, the adhesive cement–ceramic interface was analyzed using an SBS test. Subsequently, the adhesive remnant index (ARI) was measured. Data were submitted to statistical analysis. Air-borne particle abraded specimens showed the highest SBS values for COP and KAT groups. For MET, no significant difference was reported between air-borne particle abraded specimens and untreated controls. The lowest values were detected for acid-etched groups. A higher frequency of ARI = “1” and ARI = “2” was reported in control and air-borne particle abraded groups, whereas ARI = “3” was detected in hot-etched groups. No correlation was found between ARI score and shear bond strength. Air-borne particle abrasion is considered the best treatment for Zirconia Copran and Zirconia Katana ML, if it is followed by using dual-curing resin cement. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop