Special Issue "New Materials and Techniques for Orthodontics"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Maria Francesca Sfondrini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Unit of Orthodontics and Paediatric Dentistry, Section of Dentistry, Department of Clinical, Surgical, Diagnostic and Paediatric Sciences, University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy
Interests: orthodontics; adhesive dentistry; shear; bond strength; bracket; fiber-reinforced composite; craniofacial growth
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Andrea Scribante
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Unit of Orthodontics and Paediatric Dentistry, Section of Dentistry, Department of Clinical, Surgical, Diagnostic and Paediatric Sciences, University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy
Interests: orthodontics; adhesive dentistry; dental materials; adhesive dentistry; CAD/CAM; intraoral scanner; computerized cast; shear; bond strength; bracket; fiber-reinforced composite; miniscrew
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Orthodontics deals with the correction of malformations of the maxillaries and alterations in their growth and development, in order to determine a stable occlusion. The orthodontic practice encompasses a wide range of therapies, such as interceptive treatments, fixed and mobile appliances, surgical therapies, the surgical-orthodontic treatment of included and transposed teeth, pre-prosthetic treatments, retention.

New materials and techniques that are frequently introduced in daily clinical practice need continuous study and research. Accordingly, the purpose of the present Special Issue is to collect current research about the materials used in clinical orthodontics. Possible research topics include but are not limited to: adhesives, aligners, archwires, bond strength bonding interfaces, brackets, CAD/CAM, caries prevention, composites, digital impressions, digital workflow, elastodontics, fiber-reinforced composites, fixed appliances, lingual appliances, miniscrews, multi-disciplinary treatment, oral microbiology, retention, and skeletal anchorage. Additionally, materials that could influence behavioral science or patients' compliance and radiography techniques may also be taken into consideration.

Analyses of the chemical, physical and mechanical characteristics of orthodontic materials, along with basic and translational research studies, mechanical analyses, clinical trials and reviews will be considered for publication.

Before submission, authors are encouraged to carefully read over the journal's “Author Guidelines”.

Prof. Maria Francesca Sfondrini
Prof. Dr. Andrea Scribante
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • adhesives
  • aligners
  • archwires
  • behavioral science
  • bond strength
  • bonding interfaces
  • brackets
  • CAD/CAM
  • caries prevention
  • composites
  • digital impressions
  • digital workflow
  • elastodontics
  • fiber-reinforced composites
  • fixed appliances
  • lingual appliances
  • miniscrews
  • multi-disciplinary treatment
  • oral microbiology
  • orthodontics
  • patient compliance
  • radiography
  • retention
  • skeletal anchorage

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Tooth Movement Efficacy of Retraction Spring Made of a New Low Elastic Modulus Material, Gum Metal, Evaluated by the Finite Element Method
Materials 2021, 14(11), 2934; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma14112934 - 29 May 2021
Viewed by 798
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate the tooth movement efficacy of retraction springs made of a new β-titanium alloy, “gum metal”, which has a low Young’s modulus and nonlinear super elasticity. Using double loop springs incorporated into an archwire made of [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to evaluate the tooth movement efficacy of retraction springs made of a new β-titanium alloy, “gum metal”, which has a low Young’s modulus and nonlinear super elasticity. Using double loop springs incorporated into an archwire made of gum metal (GUM) and titanium molybdenum alloy (TMA), the maxillary anterior teeth were moved distally to close an extraction space. The long-term movements were simulated by the finite element method. Its procedure was constructed of two steps, with the first step being the calculation of the initial tooth movement produced by elastic deformation of the periodontal ligament, and in the second step, the alveolar socket was moved by the initial tooth movement. By repeating these steps, the tooth moved by accumulating the initial tooth movement. The number of repeating calculations was equivalent to an elapsed time. In the GUM and TMA springs, the anterior teeth firstly tipped lingually, and then became upright. As a result of these movements, the canine could move bodily. The amount of space closure in GUM spring was 1.5 times that in TMA spring. The initial tipping angle of the canine in the GUM spring was larger than that in the TMA spring. The number of repeating calculations required for the bodily movement in the GUM spring was about two times that in the TMA spring. It was predicted that the speed of space closure in the GUM spring was smaller than that in the TMA spring. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Materials and Techniques for Orthodontics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop