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Special Issue "Plant Cell and Organism Development"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Plant Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Robert Hasterok

University of Silesia in Katowice, Department of Plant Anatomy and Cytology, Katowice, Poland
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Interests: application of Brachypodium as a model genus to study various aspects of plant nuclear genome structure, dynamics, (in)stability and evolution at the cytomolecular level
Guest Editor
Dr. Alexander Betekhtin

University of Silesia in Katowice, Department of Plant Anatomy and Cytology, Katowice, Poland
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Interests: arabinogalactan proteins; cell cycle; cell wall; extensins; model plants; pectins; ploidy instability; somatic embryogenesis; somaclonal variation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Model organisms possess certain features which make them more amenable to scientific investigations compared to other, less tractable species. Today, there are many plant species applied as models in various studies, the most commonly used being Arabidopsis thaliana for dicots and rice and Brachypodium distachyon for monocots. The use of these and similar species contributes significantly to bettering our understanding of fundamental processes that govern various aspects of plant development in vivo and in vitro.

This Special Issue addresses a wide range of topics linked with plant cell and organism development with a special (though not exclusive) emphasis on using model plants. Recent research on plant tissue culture, for example, linked with plant response to abiotic and biotic stresses, somatic embryogenesis, somaclonal variation, various cytological, cytogenetic, epigenetic, and genetic aspects of cell development, and other related topics is welcome.

Prof. Dr. Robert Hasterok
Dr. Alexander Betekhtin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Abiotic stress
  • Biotic stress
  • Cell cycle
  • Cell development
  • Chromosome number and integrity
  • Endoreplication
  • Model plants
  • Plant cell tissue culture
  • Somaclonal variation
  • Somatic embryogenesis

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Effect of Nanoparticles Surface Charge on the Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Roots Development and Their Movement into the Root Cells and Protoplasts
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(7), 1650; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20071650
Received: 8 March 2019 / Revised: 29 March 2019 / Accepted: 1 April 2019 / Published: 3 April 2019
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Abstract
Increasing usage of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in different industrial areas inevitably leads to their release into the environment. Thus, living organisms, including plants, may be exposed to a direct contact with nanoparticles (NPs). Despite the growing amount of research on this topic, our [...] Read more.
Increasing usage of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in different industrial areas inevitably leads to their release into the environment. Thus, living organisms, including plants, may be exposed to a direct contact with nanoparticles (NPs). Despite the growing amount of research on this topic, our knowledge about NPs uptake by plants and their influence on different developmental processes is still insufficient. The first physical barrier for NPs penetration to the plant body is a cell wall which protects cytoplasm from external factors and environmental stresses. The absence of a cell wall may facilitate the internalization of various particles including NPs. Our studies have shown that AuNPs, independently of their surface charge, did not cross the cell wall of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) roots. However, the research carried out with using light and transmission electron microscope revealed that AuNPs with different surface charge caused diverse changes in the root’s histology and ultrastructure. Therefore, we verified whether this is only the wall which protects cells against particles penetration and for this purpose we used protoplasts culture. It has been shown that plasma membrane (PM) is not a barrier for positively charged (+) AuNPs and negatively charged (−) AuNPs, which passage to the cell. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Cell and Organism Development)
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Open AccessArticle Tempo-Spatial Pattern of Stepharine Accumulation in Stephania Glabra Morphogenic Tissues
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(4), 808; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20040808
Received: 25 December 2018 / Revised: 30 January 2019 / Accepted: 6 February 2019 / Published: 13 February 2019
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Abstract
Alkaloids attract great attention due to their valuable therapeutic properties. Stepharine, an aporphine alkaloid of Stephania glabra plants, exhibits anti-aging, anti-hypertensive, and anti-viral effects. The distribution of aporphine alkaloids in cell cultures, as well as whole plants is unknown, which hampers the development [...] Read more.
Alkaloids attract great attention due to their valuable therapeutic properties. Stepharine, an aporphine alkaloid of Stephania glabra plants, exhibits anti-aging, anti-hypertensive, and anti-viral effects. The distribution of aporphine alkaloids in cell cultures, as well as whole plants is unknown, which hampers the development of bioengineering strategies toward enhancing their production. The spatial distribution of stepharine in cell culture models, plantlets, and mature micropropagated plants was investigated at the cellular and organ levels. Stepharine biosynthesis was found to be highly spatially and temporally regulated during plant development. We proposed that self-intoxication is the most likely reason for the failure of the induction of alkaloid biosynthesis in cell cultures. During somatic embryo development, the toxic load of alkaloids inside the cells increased. Only specialized cell sites such as vascular tissues with companion cells (VT cells), laticifers, and parenchymal cells with inclusions (PI cells) can tolerate the accumulation of alkaloids, and thus circumvent this restriction. S. glabra plants have adapted to toxic pressure by forming an additional transport secretory (laticifer) system and depository PI cells. Postembryonic growth restricts specialized cell site formation during organ development. Future bioengineering strategies should include cultures enriched in the specific cells identified in this study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Cell and Organism Development)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Defining the Genetic Basis of Plant–Endophytic Bacteria Interactions
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(8), 1947; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20081947
Received: 17 March 2019 / Revised: 17 April 2019 / Accepted: 18 April 2019 / Published: 20 April 2019
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Abstract
Endophytic bacteria, which interact closely with their host, are an essential part of the plant microbiome. These interactions enhance plant tolerance to environmental changes as well as promote plant growth, thus they have become attractive targets for increasing crop production. Numerous studies have [...] Read more.
Endophytic bacteria, which interact closely with their host, are an essential part of the plant microbiome. These interactions enhance plant tolerance to environmental changes as well as promote plant growth, thus they have become attractive targets for increasing crop production. Numerous studies have aimed to characterise how endophytic bacteria infect and colonise their hosts as well as conferring important traits to the plant. In this review, we summarise the current knowledge regarding endophytic colonisation and focus on the insights that have been obtained from the mutants of bacteria and plants as well as ‘omic analyses. These show how endophytic bacteria produce various molecules and have a range of activities related to chemotaxis, motility, adhesion, bacterial cell wall properties, secretion, regulating transcription and utilising a substrate in order to establish a successful interaction. Colonisation is mediated by plant receptors and is regulated by the signalling that is connected with phytohormones such as auxin and jasmonic (JA) and salicylic acids (SA). We also highlight changes in the expression of small RNAs and modifications of the cell wall properties. Moreover, in order to exploit the beneficial plant-endophytic bacteria interactions in agriculture successfully, we show that the key aspects that govern successful interactions remain to be defined. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Cell and Organism Development)
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Int. J. Mol. Sci. EISSN 1422-0067 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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