Special Issue "Advances in Flow Modeling for Water Resources and Hydrological Engineering"

A special issue of Hydrology (ISSN 2306-5338).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 September 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Carmelina Costanzo
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Environmental Department, University of Calabria, Italy
Interests: shallow water equations; Flood Maps; flood risk assessment; urban flood; overland flow; Flood Simulation; dam break; Dam Breach; Hydrodynamic modelling
Dr. Tommaso Caloiero
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
National Research Council (CNR), Institute for Agricultural and Forest Systems in the Mediterranean (ISAFOM), Via Cavour 4/6, 87936, Rende (Cs), Italy
Interests: Hydrology; Climatology; Climate Change; Natural Hazards; Land Use Chance; Forest Ecology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Roberta Padulano
E-Mail
Guest Editor
REMHI (Regional Models and geo-Hydrological Impacts) division, Centro Euro-Mediterraneo sui Cambiamenti Climatici (Euro-Mediterranean Centre on Climate Change), Via Thomas Alva Edison, 81100 Caserta, Italy
IAFES (Impacts on Agriculture, Forests and Ecosystem Services) division, Centro Euro-Mediterraneo sui Cambiamenti Climatici (Euro-Mediterranean Centre on Climate Change), Viale Trieste 127, 01100 Viterbo, Italy
Interests: climate change modeling; climate change impacts; water demand; hydraulic structures; smart water networks; rainfall erosivity; urban flooding; flood hazard; extreme value analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

water resource systems planning and management issues are often very complex. The pressures on water resources are increasing with the expanding scale of global development involving ecological and hydrological consequences in river basins and groundwater aquifers, and water quality deterioration.

All this leads to the increasing need for investigating the effects of different human influences and impacts on the hydrological regime and on water quality like as land-use changes, climatic variability and climate changes, and intensified water and land-use practices. Moreover economic, environmental, and social issues are more and more considered in water resources research. In this context computer-based models can help to choose the right plans, designs, and policies to obtain the desired impacts.

In the last years, the advances in computer techniques allowed the water scientists to develop complex models at different scales to support water resources planning and management.

This special issue is focused on the recent advances on models and methods for water resource modelling. In particular the following issues will be discussed: 1) Basin-wide water resources planning; 2) Watershed management; 3) Flood forecasting; 4) Droughts; 5) Climate changes impacts on flood risk and water resources; 6) Reservoir operation and management; 7) River morphology and sediment transport; 8) River water quality; 9) Irrigation.

Researchers working on these topics are invited to contribute.

Dr. Carmelina Costanzo
Dr. Tommaso Caloiero
Dr. Roberta Padulano
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Hydrology is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • water resources modelling
  • flood forecast
  • climate change impacts
  • drought
  • river quality
  • river morphology
  • watershed hydrology
  • watershed management
  • reservoir management
  • irrigation

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
Effects of River Discharge and Sediment Load on Sediment Plume Behaviors in a Coastal Region: The Yukon River, Alaska and the Bering Sea
Hydrology 2021, 8(1), 45; https://doi.org/10.3390/hydrology8010045 - 12 Mar 2021
Viewed by 213
Abstract
In the Bering Sea around and off the Yukon River delta, surface sediment plumes are markedly formed by glacier-melt and rainfall sediment runoffs of the Yukon River, Alaska, in June– September. The discharge and sediment load time series of the Yukon River were [...] Read more.
In the Bering Sea around and off the Yukon River delta, surface sediment plumes are markedly formed by glacier-melt and rainfall sediment runoffs of the Yukon River, Alaska, in June– September. The discharge and sediment load time series of the Yukon River were obtained at the lowest gauging station of US Geological Survey in June 2006–September 2010. Meanwhile, by coastal observations on boat, it was found out that the river plume plunges at a boundary between turbid plume water and clean marine water at the Yukon River sediment load of more than ca. 2500 kg/s. Grain size analysis with changing salinity (‰) for the river sediment indicated that the suspended sediment becomes coarse at 2 to 5‰ by flocculation. Hence, the plume’s plunging probably occurred by the flocculation of the Yukon suspended sediment in the brackish zone upstream of the plunging boundary, where the differential settling from the flocculation is considered to have induced the turbid water intrusion into the bottom layer. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Numerical Modeling of Venturi Flume
Hydrology 2021, 8(1), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/hydrology8010027 - 04 Feb 2021
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Abstract
In order to measure flow rate in open channels, including irrigation channels, hydraulic structures are used with a relatively high degree of reliance. Venturi flumes are among the most common and efficient type, and they can measure discharge using only the water level [...] Read more.
In order to measure flow rate in open channels, including irrigation channels, hydraulic structures are used with a relatively high degree of reliance. Venturi flumes are among the most common and efficient type, and they can measure discharge using only the water level at a specific point within the converging section and an empirical discharge relationship. There have been a limited number of attempts to simulate a venturi flume using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools to improve the accuracy of the readings and empirical formula. In this study, simulations on different flumes were carried out using a total of seven different models, including the standard k–ε, RNG k–ε, realizable k–ε, k–ω, and k–ω SST models. Furthermore, large-eddy simulation (LES) and detached eddy simulation (DES) were performed. Comparison of the simulated results with physical test data shows that among the turbulence models, the k–ε model provides the most accurate results, followed by the dynamic k LES model when compared to the physical experimental data. The overall margin of error was around 2–3%, meaning that the simulation model can be reliably used to estimate the discharge in the channel. In different cross-sections within the flume, the k–ε model provides the lowest percentage of error, i.e., 1.93%. This shows that the water surface data are well calculated by the model, as the water surface profiles also follow the same vertical curvilinear path as the experimental data. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Assessment of Impacts of Climate Change on Tile Discharge and Nitrogen Yield Using the DRAINMOD Model
Hydrology 2021, 8(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/hydrology8010001 - 26 Dec 2020
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Abstract
The detrimental impacts of agricultural subsurface tile flows and their associated pollutants on water quality is a major environmental issue in the Great Lakes region and many other places globally. A strong understanding of water quality indicators along with the contribution of tile-drained [...] Read more.
The detrimental impacts of agricultural subsurface tile flows and their associated pollutants on water quality is a major environmental issue in the Great Lakes region and many other places globally. A strong understanding of water quality indicators along with the contribution of tile-drained agriculture to water contamination is necessary to assess and reduce a significant source of non-point source pollution. In this study, DRAINMOD, a field-scale hydrology and water quality model, was applied to assess the impact of future climatic change on depth to water table, tile flow and associated nitrate loss from an 8.66 ha agricultural field near Londesborough, in Southwestern Ontario, Canada. The closest available climate data from a weather station approximately 10 km from the field site was used by the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF) to generate future predictions of daily precipitation and maximum and minimum air temperatures required to create the weather files for DRAINMOD. Of the 28 models applied by MNRF, three models (CGCM3T47-Run5, GFDLCM2.0, and MIROC3.2hires) were selected based on the frequency of the models recommended for use in Ontario with SRA1B emission scenario. Results suggested that simulated tile flows and evapotranspiration (ET) in the 2071–2100 period are expected to increase by 7% and 14% compared to 1960–1990 period. Results also suggest that under future climates, significant increases in nitrate losses (about 50%) will occur along with the elevated tile flows. This work suggests that climate change will have a significant effect on field hydrology and water quality in tile-drained agricultural regions. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
An Assessment of the Recent Evolution of the Streamflow in a Near-Natural System: A Case Study in the Headwaters of the Mero Basin (Galicia, Spain)
Hydrology 2020, 7(4), 97; https://doi.org/10.3390/hydrology7040097 - 08 Dec 2020
Viewed by 552
Abstract
Observational trend analysis is fundamental for documenting changes in river flows and placing extreme events in their longer-term historical context. Observations from near-natural catchments, i.e., with little or no alteration by humans, are of great importance in detecting and attributing streamflow trends. The [...] Read more.
Observational trend analysis is fundamental for documenting changes in river flows and placing extreme events in their longer-term historical context. Observations from near-natural catchments, i.e., with little or no alteration by humans, are of great importance in detecting and attributing streamflow trends. The purpose of this study is to analyze the annual and seasonal trends of stream discharge (mean, low and high flows) in a headwater catchment in NW Spain, i.e., in the wettest corner of the Iberian Peninsula. The results showed no significant decrease in the mean annual stream discharge. However, significantly lower summer and autumn mean stream discharge and an increase in low flow period were detected, in addition to lesser autumn high flow. The rainfall pattern followed an upward trend, but was not significant. This different pattern shown by rainfall and discharge indicates that is not sufficient to explain the observed trend in stream discharge. Air temperature, most notably by enhancing evapotranspiration, may explain the altered patterns of stream discharge. Full article
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Open AccessTechnical Note
WaterbalANce, a WebApp for Thornthwaite–Mather Water Balance Computation: Comparison of Applications in Two European Watersheds
Hydrology 2021, 8(1), 34; https://doi.org/10.3390/hydrology8010034 - 20 Feb 2021
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Abstract
Nowadays, the balance between incoming precipitation and stream or spring discharge is a challenging aspect in many scientific disciplines related to water management. In this regard, although advances in the methodologies for water balance calculation concerning each component of the water cycle have [...] Read more.
Nowadays, the balance between incoming precipitation and stream or spring discharge is a challenging aspect in many scientific disciplines related to water management. In this regard, although advances in the methodologies for water balance calculation concerning each component of the water cycle have been achieved, the Thornthwaite–Mather method remains one of the most used, especially for hydrogeological purposes. In fact, in contrast to physical-based models, which require many input parameters, the Thornthwaite–Mather method is a simple, empirical, data-driven procedure in which the error associated with its use is smaller than that associated with the measurement of input data. The disadvantage of this method is that elaboration times can be excessively long if a classical MS Excel file is used for a large amount of data. Although many authors have attempted to automatize the procedure using simple algorithms or graphical user interfaces, some bugs have been detected. For these reasons, we propose a WebApp for monthly water balance calculation, called WaterbalANce. WaterbalANce was written in Python and is driven by a serverless computing approach. Two respective European watersheds are selected and presented to demonstrate the application of this method. Full article
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