Special Issue "Damaging Hydrogeological Events "

A special issue of Water (ISSN 2073-4441). This special issue belongs to the section "Hydrology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 16 October 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Olga Petrucci Website E-Mail
National Research Council of Italy, Research institute for geo-hydrological protection (CNR-IRPI), Rende (CS), Italy
Phone: +390984841424
Interests: natural hazards; floods; landslides; climate change
Guest Editor
Dr. Tommaso Caloiero Website E-Mail
National Research Council of Italy, Research Institute for Agricultural and Forest Systems in the Mediterranean (CNR-ISAFOM), Rende (CS), Italy
Interests: hydrology; climatology; climate change; natural hazards

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Damaging hydrogeological events (DHE) are periods of severe weather conditions affecting wide areas for several days, during which landslides, floods, storm surges, hail, wind, and lightning can cause huge damage and victims. The exponential growth of DHE that occurred worldwide in the last few decades may be related to the increasing frequency and magnitude of natural dangerous phenomena as a direct consequence of climate change, thus demanding a deep understanding of events development, interaction with urbanisation, and management procedures allowing to mitigate damage.

This Special Issue of Water aims to analyse all the types of phenomena causing damage during these events (landslides, floods, storm surges, wind, etc.), either singularly or in the complex framework of cascading effects that characterizes some DHE (i.e., landslide blooking river couse). The focus can be either on the metereological framework preceding the events or on the difficult recognition of the effects and damage of the events. Within this aim, interdisciplinary original research articles highlighting new ideas, study approaches, and innovations allowing efficient forecasting and management of DHE are welcomed.

Potential topics of this Special Issue of Water include, but are not limited to:

  • Case studies and comparative studies in different parts of the world;
  • New approaches to quantify risk and uncertainty;
  • Effects of land-use or land-cover change on DHE;
  • Strategies for reducing the vulnerability to DHE;
  • The effect of climate change on DHE;
  • Hydrogeologicl risk.

Dr. Olga Petrucci
Dr. Tommaso Caloiero
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Water is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Damaging hydrogeological events
  • Natural hazard
  • Hazard assessment
  • Risk analysis and management
  • Modeling
  • Validation
  • Uncertainty

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Hydrogeological and Climatological Risks Perception in a Multi-Hazard Environment: The Case of Greece
Water 2019, 11(9), 1770; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11091770 - 25 Aug 2019
Abstract
Climate-related hazards, such as wildfires and hydrogeological phenomena, cause extensive damages and casualties around the world. Despite the recent advances and technologies for risk mitigation, it is acknowledged that public risk perception is a critical factor for these tools to succeed. Greece and [...] Read more.
Climate-related hazards, such as wildfires and hydrogeological phenomena, cause extensive damages and casualties around the world. Despite the recent advances and technologies for risk mitigation, it is acknowledged that public risk perception is a critical factor for these tools to succeed. Greece and the broader Eastern Mediterranean is an area where, despite the diversity of natural disasters, there is a lack of understanding of the hazard types that people are most concerned with and how they measure against other groups of hazards (i.e., geophysical). This work uses an online survey targeting Greek people, aiming to provide a better understanding of their perception of different natural hazards. Statistical results show that people consider climate-related hazards less dangerous and likely to occur than earthquakes, which occur often as zero-impact events. Laymen may thus underestimate certain risks, which may inhibit appropriate preparation. Disaster experience was found to increase threat perceptions and to motivate preparedness. However, in what concerns climate-related hazards, the effect of experience may fade out over time. Awareness activities were found to associate with higher emergency response efficacy. Males exhibit lower risk perception and higher coping appraisals. However, prioritization of risks is almost identical between genders. Implications for risk management are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Damaging Hydrogeological Events )
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Open AccessArticle
Flood Fatalities in Europe, 1980–2018: Variability, Features, and Lessons to Learn
Water 2019, 11(8), 1682; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11081682 - 14 Aug 2019
Abstract
Floods are still a significant threat to people, despite of the considerable developments in forecasting, management, defensive, and rescue works. In the near future, climate and societal changes as both urbanization of flood prone areas and individual dangerous behaviors could increase flood fatalities. [...] Read more.
Floods are still a significant threat to people, despite of the considerable developments in forecasting, management, defensive, and rescue works. In the near future, climate and societal changes as both urbanization of flood prone areas and individual dangerous behaviors could increase flood fatalities. This paper analyzes flood mortality in eight countries using a 39-year database (1980–2018) named EUFF (EUropean Flood Fatalities), which was built using documentary sources. The narratives of fatalities were investigated and standardized in the database reporting the details of the events. The entire dataset shows a stable trend on flood fatalities, despite the existence of individual increasing (Greece, Italy, and South France) and decreasing (Turkey and Catalonia) trends. The 2466 fatalities were mainly males, aged between 30–49 years and the majority of them happened outdoor. Most often people were dragged by water/mud when travelling by motor vehicles. Some cases of hazardous behaviors, such as fording rivers, were also detected. The primary cause of death was drowning, followed by heart attack. This work contributes to understand the human–flood interaction that caused fatalities. The changes in society’s vulnerability highlighted throughout this study contribute to manage future risks, to improve people protection actions, and to reduce risk behaviors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Damaging Hydrogeological Events )
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Open AccessArticle
Multiple Effects of Intense Meteorological Events in the Benevento Province, Southern Italy
Water 2019, 11(8), 1560; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11081560 - 28 Jul 2019
Abstract
In October 2015, two intense rainfall events hit the central and southern regions of Italy and triggered a combination of different and widespread effects, including floods, landslides, and soil erosion. These outcomes devastated about 68 municipalities of the Benevento province (Campania region), killed [...] Read more.
In October 2015, two intense rainfall events hit the central and southern regions of Italy and triggered a combination of different and widespread effects, including floods, landslides, and soil erosion. These outcomes devastated about 68 municipalities of the Benevento province (Campania region), killed two people, and caused millions of euros worth of damage to structures, infrastructures, and agriculture. The town of Benevento was one of the sectors most affected by overflow. Extensive areas characterized by flyschoid outcrops experienced widespread occurrences of soil erosion and landslides, and destructive, high-velocity debris flows (about 50) afflicted areas that had experienced heavy rainfall of higher intensity (total rainfall of 415.6 mm). In this study, the characteristics of these rainfall events and related geomorphological processes were determined by (i) analyzing the available rainfall data to identify the spatial pattern, distribution, and statistical characteristics of the two storms and (ii) mapping the storm effects, such as flooded areas, landslide types, and soil erosion. These effects were then related to the spatial distribution of the storms and the local geological and geomorphologic settings that drove their initiation and development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Damaging Hydrogeological Events )
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