Special Issue "Reviews on Food Microbiology, Foodborne Pathogens, and Probiotics"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Arun K. Bhunia
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Science, Department of Comparative Pathobiology (Courtesy), Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA
Interests: microbiology; pathogenesis; host–pathogen interaction; nanobiotechnology; food safety
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In-depth high-level review articles are sought from a well-recognized and well-established research community on topics from state-of-the-art knowledge to new advances and trends, including but not limited to the following:

  • Emerging or neglected foodborne viral, bacterial, and parasitic diseases;
  • Impact of food and food components on pathogen survival, transmission, and pathogenesis;
  • Biofilm formation and the role of small molecules on biofilm formation and inactivation;
  • Foodborne pathogens and microbial ecology in nontraditional protein sources, such as human food;
  • Probiotic microbes and their application in foodborne pathogen prevention, inactivation, and control.

We look forward to receiving your contribution to this Special Issue, which will host review papers providing valuable insights into all aspects of food microbiology, foodborne pathogens, and probiotics.

Prof. Dr. Arun K. Bhunia
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • food microbiology
  • foodborne pathogens
  • probiotics
  • biofilm
  • microbial ecology

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview
Potential Risk of Three Zoonotic Protozoa (Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia duodenalis, and Toxoplasma gondii) Transmission from Fish Consumption
Foods 2020, 9(12), 1913; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9121913 - 21 Dec 2020
Abstract
In recent decades, worldwide fish consumption has increased notably worldwide. Despite the health benefits of fish consumption, it also can suppose a risk because of fishborne diseases, including parasitic infections. Global changes are leading to the emergence of parasites in new locations and [...] Read more.
In recent decades, worldwide fish consumption has increased notably worldwide. Despite the health benefits of fish consumption, it also can suppose a risk because of fishborne diseases, including parasitic infections. Global changes are leading to the emergence of parasites in new locations and to the appearance of new sources of transmission. That is the case of the zoonotic protozoa Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia duodenalis, and Toxoplasma gondii; all of them reach aquatic environments and have been found in shellfish. Similarly, these protozoa can be present in other aquatic animals, such as fish. The present review gives an overview on these three zoonotic protozoa in order to understand their potential presence in fish and to comprehensively revise all the evidences of fish as a new potential source of Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia duodenalis, and Toxoplasma gondii transmission. All of them have been found in both marine and freshwater fishes. Until now, it has not been possible to demonstrate that fish are natural hosts for these protozoa; otherwise, they would merely act as mechanical transporters. Nevertheless, even if fish only accumulate and transport these protozoa, they could be a “new” source of infection for people. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reviews on Food Microbiology, Foodborne Pathogens, and Probiotics)
Open AccessReview
Cyclospora Cayetanensis—Major Outbreaks from Ready to Eat Fresh Fruits and Vegetables
Foods 2020, 9(11), 1703; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9111703 - 20 Nov 2020
Abstract
Cyclospora cayetanensis is a coccidian protozoan that causes cyclosporiasis, a severe gastroenteric disease, especially for immunocompromised patients, children, and the elderly. The parasite is considered as an emerging organism and a major contributor of gastroenteritis worldwide. Although the global prevalence of cyclosporiasis morbidity [...] Read more.
Cyclospora cayetanensis is a coccidian protozoan that causes cyclosporiasis, a severe gastroenteric disease, especially for immunocompromised patients, children, and the elderly. The parasite is considered as an emerging organism and a major contributor of gastroenteritis worldwide. Although the global prevalence of cyclosporiasis morbidity and mortality has not been assessed, global concern has arisen since diarrheal illness and gastroenteritis significantly affect both developing countries and industrialized nations. In the last two decades, an increasing number of foodborne outbreaks has been associated with the consumption of fresh produce that is difficult to clean thoroughly and is consumed without processing. Investigations of these outbreaks have revealed the necessity to increase the awareness in clinicians of this infection, since this protozoan is often ignored by surveillance systems, and to establish control measures to reduce contamination of fresh produce. In this review, the major cyclosporiasis outbreaks linked to the consumption of ready to eat fresh fruits and vegetables are presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reviews on Food Microbiology, Foodborne Pathogens, and Probiotics)
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Open AccessReview
Effects of Probiotic Supplementation on Dyslipidemia in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials
Foods 2020, 9(11), 1540; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9111540 - 26 Oct 2020
Abstract
The effectiveness of probiotic consumption in controlling dyslipidemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has been unclear. We reviewed relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to clarify the effect of probiotic intake on dyslipidemia in T2DM patients. The Web of Science, Scopus, PubMed and [...] Read more.
The effectiveness of probiotic consumption in controlling dyslipidemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has been unclear. We reviewed relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to clarify the effect of probiotic intake on dyslipidemia in T2DM patients. The Web of Science, Scopus, PubMed and Cochrane Library databases were used for searching relevant RCTs published up to October 2020. The total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations were selected as the primary indicators for dyslipidemia. The results of 13 eligible RCTs showed that probiotic intake could significantly reduce TC (SMD: −0.23, 95% CI: (−0.37, −0.10)) and TG (SMD: −0.27, 95% CI: (−0.44, −0.11)) levels, but did not regulate LDL-C or HDL-C concentrations. Subgroup analysis showed that multispecies probiotics (≥two species), but not single-species probiotics, significantly decreased TC and TG concentrations. Furthermore, powder, but not liquid, probiotics could reduce TC and TG concentrations. This meta-analysis demonstrated that probiotic supplementation is helpful in reducing TC and TG concentrations in T2DM patients. However, more well-controlled trials are needed to clarify the benefits of probiotics on dyslipidemia in T2DM patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Reviews on Food Microbiology, Foodborne Pathogens, and Probiotics)
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