sensors-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Sensors for Toxins and Pathogen Detection 2019"

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Arun K. Bhunia
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Science, Department of Comparative Pathobiology (Courtesy), Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA
Interests: microbiology; pathogenesis; host–pathogen interaction; nanobiotechnology; food safety
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Bruce M. Applegate
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Science, Department of Biological Science, 745 Agriculture Mall Drive, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA
Interests: microbiology; biosensor; bioluminescence; bacteriophage; food safety

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue is dedicated to publishing articles that describe continued development in novel biosensors, nanosensors, aptasensors, bioluminescence, and bacteriophage-based methods for detection of live microbial pathogens and active toxins of significance to food/feed, water and environment to improving food safety, food production, and public health.

Prof. Dr. Arun K. Bhunia
Prof. Dr. Bruce M. Applegate
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sensor
  • biosensor
  • nanosensor
  • bioluminescence
  • bacteriophage
  • microbes
  • toxins
  • food safety
  • public health

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessCommunication
Visual Detection of Cucumber Green Mottle Mosaic Virus Based on Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase Coupled with DNAzymes Amplification
Sensors 2019, 19(6), 1298; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19061298 - 14 Mar 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1654
Abstract
A simple, rapid, and sensitive visual detection method for observing cucumber green mottle mosaic virus was reported based on the template-independent polymerization activity of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT), coupled with the cascade amplification of Mg2+-dependent DNAzyme and hemin/G-quadruplex DNAzyme. Briefly, the [...] Read more.
A simple, rapid, and sensitive visual detection method for observing cucumber green mottle mosaic virus was reported based on the template-independent polymerization activity of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT), coupled with the cascade amplification of Mg2+-dependent DNAzyme and hemin/G-quadruplex DNAzyme. Briefly, the hybridized dsDNA of T1/P1 was cut into two parts at its position of 5′-AA↓CG↑TT-3′ by the restricted enzyme AcII. The longer, newborn fragment originating from P1 was tailed at its 3’-end by oligo dG, and an intact enzymatic sequence of Mg2+-dependent DNAzyme was generated. The substrate sequence in the loop segment of the hairpin probe (HP) hybridized with the newborn enzymatic sequence and was cleaved into two parts in the presence of Mg2+. The locked G-quadruplex sequence in the stem segment of the HP was released, which catalyzed the oxidation of ABTS2- in the presence of H2O2, and the resulting solution turned green. A correlation between the absorbance and concentration of T1 was obtained in a range from 0.1 pM to 2 nM, with a detection limit of 0.1 pM. In addition to promoting a lower detection limit and shorter monitoring time, this method also demonstrated an excellent selectivity to single or double nucleotide changes. Therefore, the designed strategy provided a rapid and efficient platform for viral inspection and plant protection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors for Toxins and Pathogen Detection 2019)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
MAPLE Assembled Acetylcholinesterase–Polyethylenimine Hybrid and Multilayered Interfaces for Toxic Gases Detection
Sensors 2018, 18(12), 4265; https://doi.org/10.3390/s18124265 - 04 Dec 2018
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1163
Abstract
Developing a controlled method for obtaining hybrid enzymatic-based interfaces for sensing application require the use of a multiuse, reusable sensor. By controlling the interface characteristics in terms of the surface chemistry, thickness, and roughness, a tailored response toward various toxic compounds can be [...] Read more.
Developing a controlled method for obtaining hybrid enzymatic-based interfaces for sensing application require the use of a multiuse, reusable sensor. By controlling the interface characteristics in terms of the surface chemistry, thickness, and roughness, a tailored response toward various toxic compounds can be obtained, regarding both materials used as active surfaces and fabrication methods. Herein, we report a preliminary study on using a laser-based method (i.e., matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation, or MAPLE) for obtaining active polymeric–enzymatic interfaces as hybrid or layered coatings for detecting toxic vapors. The MAPLE fabrication consisted of the simultaneous alternating evaporation of layers of polyethylenimine (PEI) and acetylcholinesterase (AchE) in order to obtain active surfaces as both hybrid PEI-AchE and a PEI/AchE layered coating, respectively. The deposition processes of the polymer and enzyme were carried out using a double-target system and a Nd:YAG pulsed laser, operating at 0.45 J/cm2 fluences with a wavelength of 266 nm and a repetition rate of 10 Hz. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed no significant changes in the functional groups of both hybrid and layered coatings compared with the initial material. The thickness and roughness, as well as the morphologies of the coatings revealed by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed coatings thicker than two μm that had smooth surfaces and average roughness values below six nm. The sensors were tested with simulants for nerve gases and pesticides containing phosphonate ester groups, namely dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) and diisopropyl methylphosphonate (DIMP), and a different sensitivity was shown to the selected chemical agents for each of the sensors. The best sensitivities for DMMP and DIMP obtained by using a PEI-AchE coated sensor are 65 kHz and 200 kHz, respectively, whereas the best sensitivity when using multilayered interfaces is 30 kHz and 10 KHz for DIMP and DMMP, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sensors for Toxins and Pathogen Detection 2019)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop