Effects of Preservation Technology on Quality and Safety of Food Products

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Engineering and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2022) | Viewed by 28701

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Guest Editor
MARE-Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre, Polytechnic University of Leiria, 2520-630 Peniche, Portugal
Interests: nutraceuticals; functional foods; foods formulation; antioxidant activity; health benefits
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nowadays, consumers demand high quality and safe food that does not compromise their nutritional content and functionality during the shelf-life period.

The application of singular or combined preservation technologies to foods products reveals a challenge for the food industry, which intends to respond to consumer expectation for natural food that is less processed without synthetics compounds in their formulation. Along this line, the impact of preservation technologies (heat treatment, ultrasounds, high hydrostatic pressure, UV-C radiation, pasteurization, freezing, drying, fermentation, modified atmosphere packaging, etc.) on food quality and stability need to be evaluated.

In this Special Issue of the journal Foods, I would like to invite authors to contribute with original papers focused on effects of preservation technologies on food quality and safety to provide products with highest quality and functionality with potential impact on consumer health.

Dr. Joaquina Pinheiro
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • Postharvest treatment
  • Heat treatment
  • Ultrasounds
  • Antioxidants
  • Antimicrobial
  • UV-C radiation
  • Storage evaluation
  • Freezing
  • Fermentation
  • Drying

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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19 pages, 3688 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Pre-Drying Treatment and Drying Conditions on Quality and Energy Consumption of Hot Air-Dried Celeriac Slices: Optimisation
by Tina Nurkhoeriyati, Boris Kulig, Barbara Sturm and Oliver Hensel
Foods 2021, 10(8), 1758; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10081758 - 29 Jul 2021
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 2980
Abstract
Celeriac is a good source of fibre, trace minerals, and phenolic compounds; it has a pleasant aroma but is a perishable material, prone to discolouration. This research investigated the optimisation of the quality and energy demand in hot-air dried celeriac slices. The experiment [...] Read more.
Celeriac is a good source of fibre, trace minerals, and phenolic compounds; it has a pleasant aroma but is a perishable material, prone to discolouration. This research investigated the optimisation of the quality and energy demand in hot-air dried celeriac slices. The experiment utilised the I-optimal design of response surface methodology with 30 experiment runs. Pre-drying treatments (blanching at 85 °C, three minutes; dipping in 1% citric acid solution, three minutes; no pre-drying treatment), drying temperatures (50, 60, and 70 °C), air velocities (1.5, 2.2, and 2.9 m/s), and thickness (three-, five, and seven-mm) were applied. The drying conditions affected drying time significantly (p < 0.0001). The model by Midilli and others and the logarithmic model fitted best with celeriac slices drying kinetics. Blanched samples had a higher ΔE*ab (total colour difference) and BI (browning index) but lower WI (whiteness index) than samples with other pre-drying treatments. The rehydration ratio decreased with the increase of sample thickness and blanching (p < 0.0001). A quadratic model described the specific energy consumption (Es) best. The dried samples compared with fresh samples had increased antioxidant activity but decreased total phenolic compound value. The optimisation solution chosen was 58 °C drying temperature, 2.9 m/s air velocity, and 4.6 mm sample thickness with acid pre-drying treatment. Full article
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11 pages, 1983 KiB  
Article
BTH Treatment Delays the Senescence of Postharvest Pitaya Fruit in Relation to Enhancing Antioxidant System and Phenylpropanoid Pathway
by Xiaochun Ding, Xiaoyang Zhu, Wang Zheng, Fengjun Li, Shuangling Xiao and Xuewu Duan
Foods 2021, 10(4), 846; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10040846 - 13 Apr 2021
Cited by 27 | Viewed by 2900
Abstract
The plant resistance elicitor Benzo (1,2,3)-thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid S-methyl ester (BTH) can enhance disease resistance of harvested fruit. Nonetheless, it is still unknown whether BTH plays a role in regulating fruit senescence. In this study, exogenous BTH treatment efficiently delayed the senescence of postharvest [...] Read more.
The plant resistance elicitor Benzo (1,2,3)-thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid S-methyl ester (BTH) can enhance disease resistance of harvested fruit. Nonetheless, it is still unknown whether BTH plays a role in regulating fruit senescence. In this study, exogenous BTH treatment efficiently delayed the senescence of postharvest pitaya fruit with lower lipid peroxidation level. Furthermore, BTH-treated fruit exhibited lower hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) content, higher contents of reduced ascorbic acid (AsA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and higher ratios of reduced to oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) and ascorbic acid (AsA/DHA), as well as higher activities of ROS scavenging enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), peroxidase (POD) and glutathione reductase (GR) in comparison with control fruit. Moreover, BTH treatment enhanced the activities of phenylpropanoid pathway-related enzymes, including cinnamate-4-hydroxylase (C4H), phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and 4-coumarate/coenzyme A ligase (4CL) and the levels of phenolics, flavonoids and lignin. In addition, BTH treatment upregulated the expression of HuSOD1/3/4, HuCAT2, HuAPX1/2 and HuPOD1/2/4 genes. These results suggested that application of BTH delayed the senescence of harvested pitaya fruit in relation to enhanced antioxidant system and phenylpropanoid pathway. Full article
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14 pages, 3215 KiB  
Article
Exploring the Effect of Dehydration on Water Migrating Property and Protein Changes of Large Yellow Croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea) during Frozen Storage
by Mingtang Tan and Jing Xie
Foods 2021, 10(4), 784; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10040784 - 6 Apr 2021
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 2747
Abstract
This study aimed to explore the effect of dehydration on the water migrating property and protein changes of large yellow croaker during frozen storage. A freeze-dryer was used to accelerate experiments, which was isolated from oxygen and excluded the effects of protein oxidation. [...] Read more.
This study aimed to explore the effect of dehydration on the water migrating property and protein changes of large yellow croaker during frozen storage. A freeze-dryer was used to accelerate experiments, which was isolated from oxygen and excluded the effects of protein oxidation. After dehydration time (3, 9, 18, and 30 h) for both fast- and slow-freezing samples, the results showed that the ice sublimation of samples containing small ice crystals was faster than that of samples containing large ice crystals in the early stages of dehydration, but in the latest stage, there was an opposite trend. The results indicated that dehydration reduced the water freedom degrees and water–protein interaction. At the same time, dehydration had a significant effect on protein secondary and tertiary structures. The significant increase in surface hydrophobicity and particle size indicated that dehydration exacerbated myofibrillar protein aggregation. The ΔH1 values (from 1.275 to 0.834 J/g for slow-freezing group and from 1.129 to 0.855 J/g for fast-freezing group) decreased gradually as the dehydration time extended, indicating the decrease in protein thermal stability. Additionally, significant protein degradation occurred when the water content of the sample decreased to a certain level. This study showed that ice crystal size had an important effect on the rate of ice sublimation, and the occurrence of dehydration during frozen storage accelerated the water loss and the decrease in protein stability. Full article
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12 pages, 1323 KiB  
Article
Macroalgae-Fortified Sausages: Nutritional and Quality Aspects Influenced by Non-Thermal High-Pressure Processing
by Catarina Marçal, Carlos A. Pinto, Artur M. S. Silva, Carla Monteiro, Jorge A. Saraiva and Susana M. Cardoso
Foods 2021, 10(2), 209; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10020209 - 20 Jan 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2286
Abstract
The present work evaluated the nutritional impact of macroalgae flours used as new ingredients in fermented sausages and the feasibility of using high-pressure processing (HPP) as a non-thermal pasteurization methodology to keep the quality attributes of the new food products. A commercial macroalgae [...] Read more.
The present work evaluated the nutritional impact of macroalgae flours used as new ingredients in fermented sausages and the feasibility of using high-pressure processing (HPP) as a non-thermal pasteurization methodology to keep the quality attributes of the new food products. A commercial macroalgae mix was used in the formulation of new macroalgae-fortified meat frankfurter sausages (F-MFS), macroalgae-fortified vegetable frankfurter sausages (F-VFS) and in macroalgae-fortified traditional Portuguese sausage “chouriço” (F-TPS), overall incrementing the contents of Mg, K, Ca, Mn and Fe and decreasing the Na/K ratio. The application of HPP allowed extending the shelf-life of frankfurters by about 3-fold and improved the safety of “chouriço” along 180 days of storage, keeping its microbial load below the detection limit. The prevention of microbial growth in F-MFS and F-VFS was accompanied by pH stability of the products. In addition, no significant detriment on surface color and fatty acids was observed between pressurized and non-pressurized sausages, allowing consolidating the suitability of HPP in seaweed-fortified fermented sausages. Full article
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17 pages, 4426 KiB  
Article
Impact of Three Different Dehydration Methods on Nutritional Values and Sensory Quality of Dried Broccoli, Oranges, and Carrots
by Xanyar Mohammadi, Yuhao Deng, Golshan Matinfar, Anika Singh, Ronit Mandal and Anubhav Pratap-Singh
Foods 2020, 9(10), 1464; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9101464 - 14 Oct 2020
Cited by 27 | Viewed by 6468
Abstract
Radiant Energy Vacuum (REV)-dried broccoli, oranges, and carrots prepared by the optimal drying protocols determined in this study were compared to the freeze-dried and air-dried samples based on the nutritional values before and after drying. An accelerated shelf-life study for REV-dried broccoli, oranges, [...] Read more.
Radiant Energy Vacuum (REV)-dried broccoli, oranges, and carrots prepared by the optimal drying protocols determined in this study were compared to the freeze-dried and air-dried samples based on the nutritional values before and after drying. An accelerated shelf-life study for REV-dried broccoli, oranges, and carrots was also conducted. For all the samples, REV drying significantly shortened the processing time. The REV-dried samples had much higher retention of the nutritional values (vitamin C, β-carotene) compared to the conventional air-drying process, and the values were also competitive to those of the freeze-dried samples. Although freeze-drying resulted in the best rehydration property, the REV-dried samples still earned the highest scores in the sensory test. In the accelerated shelf-life study conducted on the REV-dried samples, the moisture content and water activity stayed at the same level, but the nutritional values showed a downward trend. The sensory properties fluctuated in the shelf-life but still gained positive feedback from the panelists. Moreover, the testing method for β-carotene content was uniquely designed in this project and could be a semi-quantitative method to refer to. Full article
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11 pages, 363 KiB  
Article
Evolution during Three Ripening Stages of Évora Cheese
by Graça P. Carvalho, Rute Santos, Anabela Fino, Paulo Ferreira, Francisco M. Rodrigues and João Dias
Foods 2020, 9(9), 1140; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9091140 - 19 Aug 2020
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2113
Abstract
The variability and heterogeneity found in Évora cheeses, Protected Designation of Origin (PDO), can affect consumers’ choices. Assessing the ripening conditions and their effect can be helpful. To study the effect of ripening duration in Évora cheese PDO, sensory and chemical analyses were [...] Read more.
The variability and heterogeneity found in Évora cheeses, Protected Designation of Origin (PDO), can affect consumers’ choices. Assessing the ripening conditions and their effect can be helpful. To study the effect of ripening duration in Évora cheese PDO, sensory and chemical analyses were performed in cheese samples subjected to 30, 60, and 120 days of ripening under controlled conditions (temperature 14 to 15 °C and humidity 65 to 70%). Sensory analysis was conducted with a homogenous panel previously familiarized with the product after a short training period, and chemical analyses including pH, moisture, NaCl content, aw, and salt-in-moisture were determined. Panelists were able to distinguish the differences in the organoleptic characteristics of the three cheese stages, and chemical determinations showed significant differences between stages. Interrater agreement was higher in the sensory evaluation of cheeses with a longer maturation period. As expected, cheeses in the 120 days ripening period presented lower pH, moisture, and water activity and had higher salt-in-moisture content. This stage received the highest scores in hardness and color of the crust, intensity, pungency of the aroma, intensity of taste and piquancy, and firmness and granular characteristics of texture. Overall acceptance of cheese samples was positive, regardless of the ripening stage, which probably reflects both the homogeneity of taster profiles and the previous knowledge of this particular product. The degree of ripeness influences the physical, chemical, and sensory characteristics but does not affect the acceptance of this product by the consumer. Full article
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Review

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28 pages, 1999 KiB  
Review
Chemical-Based Methodologies to Extend the Shelf Life of Fresh Fish—A Review
by Renata A. Amaral, Carlos A. Pinto, Vasco Lima, Jéssica Tavares, Ana P. Martins, Liliana G. Fidalgo, Ana M. Silva, Maria M. Gil, Paula Teixeira, Joana Barbosa, Francisco J. Barba and Jorge A. Saraiva
Foods 2021, 10(10), 2300; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10102300 - 28 Sep 2021
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 6828
Abstract
Due to its characteristics, fresh fish is a highly perishable food with a very short shelf-life under refrigeration. Several methods have been introduced to slow down its deterioration, such as by means of oxygen depletion of the food package (vacuum packaging), or by [...] Read more.
Due to its characteristics, fresh fish is a highly perishable food with a very short shelf-life under refrigeration. Several methods have been introduced to slow down its deterioration, such as by means of oxygen depletion of the food package (vacuum packaging), or by changing the natural atmosphere that is in contact with the fresh fish (modified atmosphere packaging), or by the use of chemicals generally recognized as safe: such compounds can be directly applied (by dipping or spraying) or incorporated into packaging materials and slowly migrate to the product, exerting a hurdle effect against microbial development and lipid oxidation (active packaging). This review aims to cover the most recent advances in chemical-based approaches for fresh fish preservation, applied either singly or in combination. Vacuum packaging, modified atmosphere, and active packaging preservation methodologies are presented, along with the inclusion of chemical additives, such as organic acids and natural extracts, and their combination with icing systems. Advantages and disadvantages of these methodologies and their impact on fresh fish quality and shelf-life are discussed, reaching the conclusion that both are positively influenced overall. Indeed, the contribution of chemical-based strategies for fresh fish preservation is undeniable, and is expected to be a research topic of increasing interest in the future. Full article
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