Special Issue "Foodborne Pathogens and Food Safety"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Quality and Safety".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 February 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Antonio Afonso Lourenco
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Teagasc Food Res Ctr, Moorepk, Fermoy, Cork, Ireland.
Interests: assessment of the microbiological diversity in biofilms associated with the dairy industry; transcriptomics of food-associated microorganisms; modeling the behavior of foodborne pathogens under environmental stress conditions such as low water activity
Dr. Catherine Burgess
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Teagasc Food Research Centre, Ashtown, Dublin, Ireland, D15 KN3K
Interests: pathogens; antimicrobial resistance; escherichia coli foodborne diseases; salmonella
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Timothy Ells
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Kentville Research and Development Centre, Kentville, NS Canada B4N 1J5
Interests: Interactions of bacterial foodborne pathogens with commensal constituents in multi-species biofilm communities. Stress adaptations of foodborne pathogens in response to inimical conditions along the food continuum.

Special Issue Information

Foodborne pathogens represent a major burden on society as they are the cause of high numbers of illnesses, hospitalizations, and deaths each year. In addition to their detrimental impact on human health, these microorganisms, which include pathogenic bacteria, viruses, fungi, and a range of parasites, also represent a significant economic cost to food companies in the implementation and constant oversight of food hygiene and safety programs, product recalls, and potential litigation if outbreaks occur. Advancing our current knowledge of the food processing chain and its vulnerabilities to the many factors related to foodborne pathogens (e.g., their stress response, survival and persistence in processing environments, acquisition of virulence factors and antimicrobial drug resistance) is paramount to the development of effective strategies for early detection and control of pathogens, thereby improving food safety.

This Special Issue welcomes original research articles contributing to a better understanding of the impact of all aspects of foodborne pathogens on food safety. Papers on the following topics are particularly encouraged:

  • Physiology, genetics, biochemistry, and behavior of foodborne pathogens;
  • Effects of antimicrobials and packaging systems on foodborne pathogens;
  • Predictive microbiology applied to foodborne pathogens in foods;
  • Interactions of pathogens in microbial communities and the ecology of foods, food production, and food processing environments;
  • Improved or novel methods for the detection, identification and enumeration of foodborne pathogens and microbial toxins;
  • Microbiological challenge testing for ensuring the safety of food products;
  • Risk assessment and microbial responses to stresses in the food chain.

Dr. Antonio Afonso Lourenco
Dr. Catherine Burgess
Dr. Timothy Ells
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • foodborne pathogens
  • antimicrobial susceptibility
  • virulence
  • foodborne illnesses
  • food safety
  • food contamination
  • modeling
  • risk assessment
  • food chain

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Growth Potential of Listeria monocytogenes on Refrigerated Spinach and Rocket Leaves in Modified Atmosphere Packaging
Foods 2020, 9(9), 1211; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9091211 - 01 Sep 2020
Viewed by 1282
Abstract
Minimally processed ready-to-eat (RTE) vegetables are increasingly consumed for their health benefits. However, they also pose a risk of being ingested with food-borne pathogens. The present study investigated the ability of RTE spinach and rocket to support the growth of Listeria monocytogenes as [...] Read more.
Minimally processed ready-to-eat (RTE) vegetables are increasingly consumed for their health benefits. However, they also pose a risk of being ingested with food-borne pathogens. The present study investigated the ability of RTE spinach and rocket to support the growth of Listeria monocytogenes as previous studies provided contradicting evidence. Findings were compared to growth on iceberg lettuce that has repeatedly been shown to support growth. Products were inoculated with a three-strain mix of L. monocytogenes at 10 and 100 cfu g−1 and stored in modified atmosphere (4 kPa O2, 8 kPa CO2) at 8 °C over 7–9 days. Spinach demonstrated the highest growth potential rate of 2 to 3 log10 cfu g−1 over a 9-day period with only marginal deterioration in its visual appearance. Growth potential on rocket was around 2 log10 cfu g−1 over 9 days with considerable deterioration in visual appearance. Growth potential of iceberg lettuce was similar to that of rocket over a 7-day period. Growth curves fitted closely to a linear growth model, indicating none to limited restrictions of growth over the duration of storage. The high growth potentials of L. monocytogenes on spinach alongside the limited visual deterioration highlight the potential risks of consuming this raw RTE food product when contaminated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foodborne Pathogens and Food Safety)
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Review

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Review
Salmonella, Food Safety and Food Handling Practices
Foods 2021, 10(5), 907; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10050907 - 21 Apr 2021
Viewed by 524
Abstract
Salmonellosis is the second most reported gastrointestinal disorder in the EU resulting from the consumption of Salmonella-contaminated foods. Symptoms include gastroenteritis, abdominal cramps, bloody diarrhoea, fever, myalgia, headache, nausea and vomiting. In 2018, Salmonella accounted for more than half of the numbers [...] Read more.
Salmonellosis is the second most reported gastrointestinal disorder in the EU resulting from the consumption of Salmonella-contaminated foods. Symptoms include gastroenteritis, abdominal cramps, bloody diarrhoea, fever, myalgia, headache, nausea and vomiting. In 2018, Salmonella accounted for more than half of the numbers of foodborne outbreak illnesses reported in the EU. Salmonella contamination is mostly associated with produce such as poultry, cattle and their feeds but other products such as dried foods, infant formula, fruit and vegetable products and pets have become important. Efforts aimed at controlling Salmonella are being made. For example, legislation and measures put in place reduced the number of hospitalizations between 2014 and 2015. However, the number of hospitalizations started to increase in 2016. This calls for more stringent controls at the level of government and the private sector. Food handlers of “meat processing” and “Ready to Eat” foods play a crucial role in the spread of Salmonella. This review presents an updated overview of the global epidemiology, the relevance of official control, the disease associated with food handlers and the importance of food safety concerning salmonellosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foodborne Pathogens and Food Safety)
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Review
Antimicrobial Blue Light versus Pathogenic Bacteria: Mechanism, Application in the Food Industry, Hurdle Technologies and Potential Resistance
Foods 2020, 9(12), 1895; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9121895 - 18 Dec 2020
Viewed by 977
Abstract
Blue light primarily exhibits antimicrobial activity through the activation of endogenous photosensitizers, which leads to the formation of reactive oxygen species that attack components of bacterial cells. Current data show that blue light is innocuous on the skin, but may inflict photo-damage to [...] Read more.
Blue light primarily exhibits antimicrobial activity through the activation of endogenous photosensitizers, which leads to the formation of reactive oxygen species that attack components of bacterial cells. Current data show that blue light is innocuous on the skin, but may inflict photo-damage to the eyes. Laboratory measurements indicate that antimicrobial blue light has minimal effects on the sensorial and nutritional properties of foods, although future research using human panels is required to ascertain these findings. Food properties also affect the efficacy of antimicrobial blue light, with attenuation or enhancement of the bactericidal activity observed in the presence of absorptive materials (for example, proteins on meats) or photosensitizers (for example, riboflavin in milk), respectively. Blue light can also be coupled with other treatments, such as polyphenols, essential oils and organic acids. While complete resistance to blue light has not been reported, isolated evidence suggests that bacterial tolerance to blue light may occur over time, especially through gene mutations, although at a slower rate than antibiotic resistance. Future studies can aim at characterizing the amount and type of intracellular photosensitizers across bacterial species and at assessing the oxygen-independent mechanism of blue light—for example, the inactivation of spoilage bacteria in vacuum-packed meats. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foodborne Pathogens and Food Safety)
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