Application of Chromatography to Food Analysis

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Analytical Methods".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (3 March 2023) | Viewed by 14732

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
I. U. CINQUIMA, Analytical Chemistry Group, Faculty of Sciences, University of Valladolid, Paseo de Belén 7, 471011 Valladolid, Spain
Interests: chromatography; separation science; food analysis; food safety; pharmaceutical analysis; enviromental analysis; method development
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
I.U. CINQUIMA, Analytical Chemistry Group, Faculty of Sciences, University of Valladolid, Paseo de Belén 7, 471011 Valladolid, Spain
Interests: chromatography; separation science; food analysis; food safety; pharmaceutical analysis; environmental analysis; method development
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Chromatography is probably the most commonly used analytical technique in the separation of individual compounds in foods and other matrices. It is usually applied in the characterization of bioactive compounds and aroma-related compounds to foods, or in the determination of food contaminants such as pesticides, veterinary drugs, or antibiotics. This implies that different chromatographic techniques, especially those related to liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, and supercritical fluid chromatography, are quite usual techniques in food companies and food research centers. In this regard, this Special Issue on “Application of Chromatography in Food Analysis” is a unique opportunity to gather the state of the art of chromatographic methods to control the safety and bioactivity of foods. This topic involves scientific communities working in pest control, the analysis of residues of pesticides and chemicals in foods, and also those laboratories working on the revalorization and characterization of bioactive compounds from any food commodities, providing an overview of the main trends in the area. Therefore, papers dealing with both chromatographic method development and the application of chromatographic methods on food topics, including raw materials, are welcome. Additionally, papers discussing the results from chromatographic analyses on food products or raw materials for food production will be included.

Best regards,

Dr. José Bernal del Nozal
Dr. Ana M. Ares
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bioactive compounds
  • chemical residues
  • food authentication
  • mycotoxins
  • organic pollutants
  • pesticide residues
  • phytochemicals
  • organic pollutants
  • safety of food commodities
  • veterinary drugs

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

16 pages, 1491 KiB  
Article
Fast Chromatographic Determination of Free Amino Acids in Bee Pollen
by Beatriz Martín-Gómez, Laura Salahange, Jesús A. Tapia, María T. Martín, Ana M. Ares and José Bernal
Foods 2022, 11(24), 4013; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11244013 - 12 Dec 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2705
Abstract
The consumption of bee pollen has increased in the last few years due to its nutritional and health-promoting properties, which are directly related to its bioactive constituents, such as amino acids. Currently, there is great interest in understanding the role of these in [...] Read more.
The consumption of bee pollen has increased in the last few years due to its nutritional and health-promoting properties, which are directly related to its bioactive constituents, such as amino acids. Currently, there is great interest in understanding the role of these in bee products as it provides relevant information, e.g., regarding nutritional value or geographical and botanical origins. In the present study, two fast chromatographic methods were adapted based on commercial EZ:faast™ kits for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry for determining free amino acids in bee pollen. Both methods involved the extraction of amino acids with water, followed by a solid phase extraction to eliminate interfering compounds, and a derivatization of the amino acids prior to their chromatographic separation. The best results in terms of run time (<7 min), matrix effect, and limits of quantification (3–75 mg/kg) were obtained when gas chromatography–mass spectrometry was employed. This latter methodology was applied to analyze several bee pollen samples obtained from local markets and experimental apiaries. The findings obtained from a statistical examination based on principal component analysis showed that bee pollen samples from commercial or experimental apiaries were different in their amino acid composition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Chromatography to Food Analysis)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

15 pages, 845 KiB  
Article
Separation and Detection of Abamectin, Ivermectin, Albendazole and Three Metabolites in Eggs Using Reversed-Phase HPLC Coupled with a Photo Diode Array Detector
by Yawen Guo, Zhaoyuan He, Yali Zhu, Shuyu Liu, Pengfei Gao, Kaizhou Xie, Tao Zhang and Yuhao Dong
Foods 2022, 11(23), 3894; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11233894 - 2 Dec 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2063
Abstract
An innovative and sensitive approach using high-performance liquid chromatography-photo diode array detection (HPLC-PDAD) was developed and optimized for the simultaneous determination of abamectin (ABM), ivermectin (IVM), albendazole (ABZ) and three metabolites in eggs. The samples were extracted with acetonitrile (MeCN)/water (90:10, v/ [...] Read more.
An innovative and sensitive approach using high-performance liquid chromatography-photo diode array detection (HPLC-PDAD) was developed and optimized for the simultaneous determination of abamectin (ABM), ivermectin (IVM), albendazole (ABZ) and three metabolites in eggs. The samples were extracted with acetonitrile (MeCN)/water (90:10, v/v), and the extracts containing the targets were cleaned up and concentrated by a series of liquid–liquid extraction (LLE) steps. A reversed-phase C18 column and a mobile phase consisting of 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) aqueous solution and methanol (MeOH) were utilized to perform optimal chromatographic separation. The developed method was validated on the basis of international guidelines. The limits of detection (LODs) and quantitation (LOQs) were 2.1–10.5 µg/kg and 7.8–28.4 µg/kg, respectively. Satisfactory linear relationships were observed for the targets in their corresponding concentration ranges. The mean recoveries ranged from 85.7% to 97.21% at 4 addition levels, with intraday and interday relative standard deviations (RSDs) in the ranges of 1.68–4.77% and 1.74–5.31%, respectively. The presented protocol was demonstrated to be applicable and reliable by being applied for the detection of target residues in locally sourced egg samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Chromatography to Food Analysis)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

14 pages, 2447 KiB  
Article
Characterization of the Flavor Precursors and Flavor Fingerprints in Grazing Lambs by Foodomics
by Yuanyuan Yang, Jing Li, Xueting Jia, Qingyu Zhao, Qing Ma, Yanan Yu, Chaohua Tang and Junmin Zhang
Foods 2022, 11(2), 191; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11020191 - 12 Jan 2022
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 2847
Abstract
Tan sheep are greatly preferred by consumers in China because of their nutritional value and unique flavor. However, the meat quality of Tan sheep has decreased due to the change in feeding systems from grazing to indoor. Studies investigating the mechanisms for the [...] Read more.
Tan sheep are greatly preferred by consumers in China because of their nutritional value and unique flavor. However, the meat quality of Tan sheep has decreased due to the change in feeding systems from grazing to indoor. Studies investigating the mechanisms for the decrease in meat quality are limited. A total of 28 Tan sheep were randomly allocated to two treatments, receiving a concentrated diet, or pasture. Flavor precursors and volatile compounds were analyzed with foodomics. E-nose and E-tongue analyses suggested that the aroma and taste profiles differed between the feeding systems. The grazing lambs had higher levels of linoleic acid and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (p < 0.01). Metabolomics indicated that 25 hydrophilic metabolites active in glycolipid and amino acid metabolisms were changed by the feeding system. Among the 57 volatile compounds identified, methional, γ-butyrolactone, benzaldehyde, and ethyl acetate were at concentrations significantly higher in the grazing lambs than the indoor-fed lambs (p < 0.01). These results reveal key changes in flavor precursors and flavor profiles affected by the feeding system, which may provide an initial view of the reason for consumer preference for the grazing Tan sheep. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Chromatography to Food Analysis)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 1677 KiB  
Article
Separation of Fructosyl Oligosaccharides in Maple Syrup by Using Charged Aerosol Detection
by Kanta Sato, Tetsushi Yamamoto, Kuniko Mitamura and Atsushi Taga
Foods 2021, 10(12), 3160; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10123160 - 20 Dec 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3629 | Correction
Abstract
Fructosyl oligosaccharides, including fructo-oligosaccharide (FOS), are gaining popularity as functional oligosaccharides and have been found in various natural products. Our previous study suggested that maple syrup contains an unidentified fructosyl oligosaccharide. Because these saccharides cannot be detected with high sensitivity using derivatization methods, [...] Read more.
Fructosyl oligosaccharides, including fructo-oligosaccharide (FOS), are gaining popularity as functional oligosaccharides and have been found in various natural products. Our previous study suggested that maple syrup contains an unidentified fructosyl oligosaccharide. Because these saccharides cannot be detected with high sensitivity using derivatization methods, they must be detected directly. As a result, an analytical method based on charged aerosol detection (CAD) that can detect saccharides directly was optimized in order to avoid relying on these structures and physical properties to clarify the profile of fructosyl oligosaccharides in maple syrup. This analytical method is simple and can analyze up to hepta-saccharides in 30 min. This analytical method was also reliable and reproducible with high validation values. It was used to determine the content of saccharides in maple syrup, which revealed that it contained not only fructose, glucose, and sucrose but also FOS such as 1-kestose and nystose. Furthermore, we identified neokestose as a maple syrup content. It has only been found in a few natural foods as a fructosyl oligosaccharide. These findings help to shed light on the saccharides profile of maple syrup. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Chromatography to Food Analysis)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

17 pages, 1085 KiB  
Article
Natural Occurrence of Ochratoxin A in Spices Marketed in the Czech Republic during 2019–2020
by Darina Pickova, Jakub Toman, Vladimir Ostry and Frantisek Malir
Foods 2021, 10(12), 2984; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10122984 - 3 Dec 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1867
Abstract
Spices are a popular ingredient in cuisine worldwide but can pose a health risk as they are prone to fungal infestation and mycotoxin contamination. The purpose of this study was to evaluate ochratoxin A (OTA) in 54 single-kind traditional and less traditional spices, [...] Read more.
Spices are a popular ingredient in cuisine worldwide but can pose a health risk as they are prone to fungal infestation and mycotoxin contamination. The purpose of this study was to evaluate ochratoxin A (OTA) in 54 single-kind traditional and less traditional spices, each of which was purchased in six samples of different batches (324 samples in total) at the Czech market during 2019–2020. The HPLC-FLD method with pre-treatment by immunoaffinity columns was employed to determine OTA. The limits of detection and quantification were 0.03 ng g−1 and 0.10 ng g−1, respectively. A total of 101 (31%) samples of 19 spice kinds were positive at concentrations ranging from 0.11–38.46 ng g−1. Only turmeric was contaminated with an OTA level exceeding the European Union limits. However, most spices have no regulation, thus further extensive monitoring of various mycotoxins in various kinds of spices is necessary. Chilli and black pepper are the most studied spices for OTA contamination, however, many other kinds of spice can also be highly contaminated, but studies on them are less common, rare, or have not yet been performed. The uniqueness of this study lies in the wide range of spice types studied for the presence of OTA on the Czech market. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Chromatography to Food Analysis)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop