Special Issue "Ecology of Spoilage Associated Microorganisms in Food Products: Origin, Diversity, Behaviour and Spoilage Phenomena"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 February 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Simbarashe Samapundo

Ghent University, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Department of Food Technology, Safety and Health, Research Unit Food Microbiology and Food Preservation, Gent, Belgium
Website | E-Mail
Interests: pathogenic and spoilage spore forming microorganisms; food preservation; microbial source tracking; applied food mycology; predictive microbiology/mycology; water relations in foods; food safety and hygiene of street foods

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the last few decades, food microbiologists established the microbial ecology of food products and microbial behavior during processing and storage. From these studies, what are now widely-known as specific spoilage organisms (SSOs) were identified for various types of food products. These have subsequently been widely used as model spoilage microorganisms in most food preservation studies, challenge tests, etc., enabling appropriate preservation (prevention) strategies to be devised.

However, food processing and packaging techniques have been evolving rapidly. In some cases these changes may have a significant impact on the microbial ecology and spoilage phenomena of food products. In addition to this, rapid advances in metagenomics and metabolomics have enabled vast amounts of data to be assembled on the microbial ecology of food products and the role of specific microorganisms in their spoilage. These techniques have also been used to identify the origin of food spoilage microorganisms in food products, which is very important for devising appropriate control strategies.

The aim of this Special Issue is to present the state-of-the-art regarding the ecology of microbial spoilage organisms in food products, their origin, behavior in the food processing environment and spoilage associated phenomena. 

Dr. Simbarashe Samapundo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Microbial ecology
  • Spoilage phenomena
  • Bacteria
  • Yeasts
  • Moulds
  • Source tracking

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle The Use of Colors as an Alternative to Size in Fusarium graminearum Growth Studies
Received: 28 May 2018 / Revised: 19 June 2018 / Accepted: 25 June 2018 / Published: 27 June 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (3178 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Size-based fungal growth studies have limitations. For example, the growth in size stops in closed systems once it reaches the borders and poorly describes metabolic status, especially in the stationary phase. This might lead mycotoxin studies to unrealistic results. Color change could be
[...] Read more.
Size-based fungal growth studies have limitations. For example, the growth in size stops in closed systems once it reaches the borders and poorly describes metabolic status, especially in the stationary phase. This might lead mycotoxin studies to unrealistic results. Color change could be a viable alternative, as pigments result from a mold’s metabolic activity. This study aimed to verify the possibility of using gray values and the RGB system to analyze the growth of Fusarium graminearum. It consisted of color and area measurements using ImageJ software for specimens grown in yeast extract agar (YEA). The results suggest the utility of color and gray values as reliable tools to analyze the growth of F. graminearum. Full article
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