Special Issue "Polyphenols in Foods and their Function in Disease Prevention"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 March 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Joe Vinson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, University of Scranton, Scranton, PA, USA
Tel. 1-570-941-7551
Interests: analytical chemistry; diabetology; nutritional biochemistry; glycation; ascorbic acid; antioxidant assays; lipids; diabetes; metabolism; food chemistry; anthocyanins; nutraceuticals; phytochemicals; bioactive; herbal medicine

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Among foods, plant foods are especially good for providing essential nutrients. However, in intervention studies, single nutrients, such as vitamins or minerals given as pure substances, are not found to be preventative. Recently, the focus has been on a class of compounds known as polyphenols, which are not nutrients and that are found in high quantities in the highly-disease-preventative “Mediterranean Diet”. This Special Issue will focus on polyphenols and especially their metabolites and the mechanism by which they prevent chronic diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and Alzheimer’s disease.

Dr. Joe A. Vinson
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • polyphenols
  • metabolites
  • mechanism
  • heart disease
  • cancer
  • Alzheimer’s disease

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Optimizing Extraction Conditions of Free and Bound Phenolic Compounds from Rice By-Products and Their Antioxidant Effects
Foods 2018, 7(6), 93; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods7060093 - 13 Jun 2018
Cited by 4
Abstract
Rice by-products are extensively abundant agricultural wastes from the rice industry. This study was designed to optimize experimental conditions for maximum recovery of free and bound phenolic compounds from rice by-products. Optimized conditions were determined using response surface methodology based on total phenolic [...] Read more.
Rice by-products are extensively abundant agricultural wastes from the rice industry. This study was designed to optimize experimental conditions for maximum recovery of free and bound phenolic compounds from rice by-products. Optimized conditions were determined using response surface methodology based on total phenolic content (TPC), ABTS radical scavenging activity and ferric reducing power (FRAP). A Box-Behnken design was used to investigate the effects of ethanol concentration, extraction time and temperature, and NaOH concentration, hydrolysis time and temperature for free and bound fractions, respectively. The optimal conditions for the free phenolics were 41–56%, 40 °C, 10 min, whereas for bound phenolics were 2.5–3.6 M, 80 °C, 120 min. Under these conditions free TPC, ABTS and FRAP values in the bran were approximately 2-times higher than in the husk. However, bound TPC and FRAP values in the husk were 1.9- and 1.2-times higher than those in the bran, respectively, while bran fraction observed the highest ABTS value. Ferulic acid was most evident in the bran, whereas p-coumaric acid was mostly found in the husk. Findings from this study demonstrates that rice by-products could be exploited as valuable sources of bioactive components that could be used as ingredients of functional food and nutraceuticals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polyphenols in Foods and their Function in Disease Prevention)
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Open AccessArticle
Protection by the Total Flavonoids from Rosa laevigata Michx Fruit against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Liver Injury in Mice via Modulation of FXR Signaling
Foods 2018, 7(6), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods7060088 - 08 Jun 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
We previously reported the effects of the total flavonoids (TFs) from Rosa laevigata Michx fruit against carbon tetrachloride-induced liver damage, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and liver ischemia-reperfusion injury. However, there have been no papers reporting the role of R. laevigata TFs against lipopolysaccharide [...] Read more.
We previously reported the effects of the total flavonoids (TFs) from Rosa laevigata Michx fruit against carbon tetrachloride-induced liver damage, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and liver ischemia-reperfusion injury. However, there have been no papers reporting the role of R. laevigata TFs against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced liver injury. In this paper, liver injury in mice was induced by LPS, and R. Laevigata extract was intragastrically administered to the mice for 7 days. Biochemical parameters in serum and liver tissue were examined, and pathological changes were observed by transmission electron microscopy, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and Oil Red O staining. The results showed that the TFs markedly reduced serum ALT (alanine transferase), AST (aspartate transaminase), TG (total triglyceride), and TC (total cholesterol) levels and relative liver weights and improved liver pathological changes. In addition, the TFs markedly decreased tissue MDA (malondialdehyde) level and increased the levels of SOD (superoxide dismutase) and GSH-Px (glutathione peroxidase). A mechanistic study showed that the TFs significantly increased the expression levels of Nrf2 (nuclear erythroid factor2-related factor 2), HO-1 (heme oxygenase-1), NQO1 (NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (quinone 1), GCLC (glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit), and GCLM (glutamate-cysteine ligase regulatory subunit) and decreased Keap1 (Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1) level by activating FXR (farnesoid X receptor) against oxidative stress. Furthermore, the TFs markedly suppressed the nuclear translocation of NF-κB (nuclear factor-kappa B) and subsequently decreased the expression levels of IL (interleukin)-1β, IL-6, HMGB-1 (high -mobility group box 1), and COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2) by activating FXR and FOXO3a (forkhead box O3) against inflammation. Besides, the TFs obviously reduced the expression levels of SREBP-1c (sterol regulatory element-binding proteins-1c), ACC1 (acetyl-CoA carboxylase-1), FASN (fatty acid synthase), and SCD1 (stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase 1), and improved CPT1 (carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1) level by activating FXR to regulate lipid metabolism. Our results suggest that TFs exhibited protective effect against LPS-induced liver injury by altering FXR-mediated oxidative stress, inflammation, and lipid metabolism, and should be developed as an effective food and healthcare product for the therapy of liver injury in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polyphenols in Foods and their Function in Disease Prevention)
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