Special Issue "Applications of Nanotechnology in Developing Functional Foods"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Engineering and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 July 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Aydin Berenjian
Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Science and Engineering, The University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand
Interests: Bioprocess engineering and intensification; functional foods; nanobiotechnology; smart industry
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Irfan Turhan
Website
Guest Editor
Akdeniz University, Turkey
Interests: Fermentation and enzyme technology, Food engineering

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The journal Foods (ISSN 2304-8158) is currently running a Special Issue entitled "Applications of Nanotechnology in Developing Functional Foods", for which we are serving as Guest Editors.

Functional foods have a large and growing global market and are regarded as one of the most actively researched areas of food science. Food products are considered functional if they provide a health benefit beyond the traditional nutrients they contain. Due to the high potential benefit of functional foods and the relationship between diet and health there is a huge interest in developing novel functional food products. Nanoparticles, nanotechnology techniques or tools could provide opportunities and challenges in functional food development. The aim of this Special Issue is, therefore, to collect contributions drawing on different and complementary areas of expertise focused on the role of nanotechnology in developing more sustainable food products.

We sincerely invite high quality original research and review papers encompassing both experimental and theoretical works addressing the synthesis of nanomaterials for the application in food products, as well as developing novel functional food products with the help of nanotechnology, and the evaluation of their quality and functionality.

Dr. Aydin Berenjian
Dr. Irfan Turhan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Surface-functionalized nanomaterials
  • Nanocarrier systems
  • Organic and inorganic nanosized additives
  • Processed nanostructured or -textured
  • Quality and functionality evaluation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Rhus and Safflower Extracts as Potential Novel Food Antioxidant, Anticancer, and Antimicrobial Agents Using Nanotechnology
Foods 2019, 8(4), 139; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8040139 - 23 Apr 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2296
Abstract
Green synthesis of metal nanoparticles using plant extracts offers a safe and attractive alternate to the chemical methods. The present work aims at preparing metal nanoparticles of rhus (Rhus coriaria L.) and safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) extracts using Fe2+, [...] Read more.
Green synthesis of metal nanoparticles using plant extracts offers a safe and attractive alternate to the chemical methods. The present work aims at preparing metal nanoparticles of rhus (Rhus coriaria L.) and safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) extracts using Fe2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, and Ag+ ions. The water extracts were prepared, and the total polyphenols and flavonoids contents were determined. The safflower extract contained the highest number of total polyphenols and total flavonoids (87.20 mg GAE/g and 36.32 mg QE/g), respectively. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using UV–Visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). The studied extracts and their nanoparticles were evaluated as an antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer agents. The plant extracts and their nanoparticles showed significant antioxidant activity using (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS•+) and 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assays. Safflower silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were the most powerful antimicrobial agent compared to the other nanoparticles. The Sulforhodamine B (SRB) cytotoxic activity was evaluated against three cancer cell lines. The results revealed that CuNP safflower nanoparticles displayed the highest activity as anticancer agent with values (98.94% with T47D, 97.68% with HEPG2, and 89.33% against Caco-2). The data revealed that rhus and safflower extracts and their nanoparticles possess high potential activity as antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anticancer agents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Nanotechnology in Developing Functional Foods)
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Open AccessArticle
Xanthan Gum Capped ZnO Microstars as a Promising Dietary Zinc Supplementation
Foods 2019, 8(3), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8030088 - 02 Mar 2019
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1844
Abstract
Zinc is one of the essential trace elements, and plays an important role in human health. Severe zinc deficiency can negatively affect organs such as the epidermal, immune, central nervous, gastrointestinal, skeletal, and reproductive systems. In this study, we offered a novel biocompatible [...] Read more.
Zinc is one of the essential trace elements, and plays an important role in human health. Severe zinc deficiency can negatively affect organs such as the epidermal, immune, central nervous, gastrointestinal, skeletal, and reproductive systems. In this study, we offered a novel biocompatible xanthan gum capped zinc oxide (ZnO) microstar as a potential dietary zinc supplementation for food fortification. Xanthan gum (XG) is a commercially important extracellular polysaccharide that is widely used in diverse fields such as the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries, due to its nontoxic and biocompatible properties. In this work, for the first time, we reported a green procedure for the synthesis of ZnO microstars using XG, as the stabilizing agent, without using any synthetic or toxic reagent. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to study the structure, morphology, and size of the synthesized ZnO structures. The results showed that the synthesized structures were both hexagonal phase and starlike, with an average particle size of 358 nm. The effect of different dosages of XG-capped ZnO nanoparticles (1–9 mM) against Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) and Gram-positive (Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus subtilis, and Bacillus sphaericus) bacteria were also investigated. Based on the results, the fabricated XG-capped ZnO microstars showed a high level of biocompatibility with no antimicrobial effect against the tested microorganisms. The data suggested the potential of newly produced ZnO microstructures for a range of applications in dietary supplementation and food fortification. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Nanotechnology in Developing Functional Foods)
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