Special Issue "Microorganisms with Probiotic Properties"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Konstantinos Papadimitriou
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Peloponnese, Antikalamos, Kalamata, Greece
Interests: lactic acid bacteria; probiotics; functional foods; dairy products; meat products; bacterial genetics; genomics; metagenomics; bacteriocins
Dr. Laura Treu
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biology, University of Padova, Italy
Interests: genomics and metagenomics; lactic acid bacteria and yeasts; probiotics and bacteriocins; dairy products and beverages; molecular biology; bioinformatics; gene expression
Dr. Stefano Campanaro
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biology, University of Padova, Italy
Interests: microbial genomics; metagenomics; bioinformatics; anaerobic digestion; food microbiology with focus on Saccharomyces cerevisiae; lactic acid bacteria
Dr. Marina Papadelli
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture and Foods, University of Peloponnese, Greece
Interests: lactic acid bacteria; bacteriocins; probiotics; fermented foods microbiology; dairy products
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The concept of probiotics is currently well established for consumers and the research community. Everybody understands that probiotics are microorganisms that, when consumed, confer some kind of health benefit to the host. The global probiotics market size reaches tens of billions of dollars each year, and numerous probiotic foods and supplements are sold around the world. The recent advent of omics approaches and the research concerning the human microbiome have revolutionized our understanding of probiotics. The focus of this Special Issue concerns all major aspects of probiotics research. Among others, this would include studies focusing on:

a. the description of novel probiotic strains and products,

b. new ways to screen for probiotics,

c. the molecular mode of action of probiotics,

d. genomics (including functional genomics) and proteomics applied to understand the properties of probiotics,

e. the development of animal models to test new probiotic properties, and

f. the physiological responses of the host to the administration of probiotics.

We are particularly interested in receiving studies concerning the identification of probiotics deriving from studies of the gut microbiome and the action of probiotic on distal to the gut regions (e.g., the urogenital tract, the brain), as well as clinical studies. Both review and research articles will be welcomed in this Special Issue.

Assistant Prof. Dr. Konstantinos Papadimitriou
Dr. Laura Treu
Associate Prof. Dr. Stefano Campanaro
Associate Prof. Dr. Marina Papadelli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Probiotics
  • Mode of action
  • Genomics
  • Proteomics
  • Metagenomics
  • Gut
  • Microbiome
  • Psychobiotics
  • Clinical studies
  • Functional foods

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Potential Application of Apilactobacillus kunkeei for Human Use: Evaluation of Probiotic and Functional Properties
Foods 2020, 9(11), 1535; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9111535 - 25 Oct 2020
Abstract
Apilactobacillus kunkeei is an insect symbiont with documented beneficial effects on the health of honeybees. It belongs to fructophilic lactic acid bacteria (FLAB), a subgroup of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) notably recognized for their safe status. This fact, together with its recurrent isolation [...] Read more.
Apilactobacillus kunkeei is an insect symbiont with documented beneficial effects on the health of honeybees. It belongs to fructophilic lactic acid bacteria (FLAB), a subgroup of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) notably recognized for their safe status. This fact, together with its recurrent isolation from hive products that are traditionally part of the human diet, suggests its possible safe use as human probiotic. Our data concerning three strains of A. kunkeei isolated from bee bread and honeybee gut highlighted several interesting features, such as the presence of beneficial enzymes (β-glucosidase, β-galactosidase and leucine arylamidase), the low antibiotic resistance, the ability to inhibit P. aeruginosa and, for one tested strain, E. faecalis, and an excellent viability in presence of high sugar concentrations, especially for one strain tested in sugar syrup stored at 4 °C for 30 d. This datum is particularly stimulating, since it demonstrates that selected strains of A. kunkeei can be used for the probiotication of fruit preparations, which are often used in the diet of hospitalized and immunocompromised patients. Finally, we tested for the first time the survival of strains belonging to the species A. kunkeei during simulated gastrointestinal transit, detecting a similar if not a better performance than that showed by Lacticaseibacillus rhamnosus GG, used as probiotic control in each trial. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microorganisms with Probiotic Properties)
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Open AccessArticle
Tannin-tolerant and Extracellular Tannase Producing Bacillus Isolated from Traditional Fermented Tea Leaves and Their Probiotic Functional Properties
Foods 2020, 9(4), 490; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9040490 - 13 Apr 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
A total of 117 Bacillus strains were isolated from Miang, a culture relevant fermented tea of northern Thailand. These strains were collected from 16 sampling sites in north Thailand. In this collection 95 isolates were tannin-tolerant Bacillus capable of growth on nutrient agar [...] Read more.
A total of 117 Bacillus strains were isolated from Miang, a culture relevant fermented tea of northern Thailand. These strains were collected from 16 sampling sites in north Thailand. In this collection 95 isolates were tannin-tolerant Bacillus capable of growth on nutrient agar supplemented with 0.5% (w/v) total tannins from tea leaves extract (TE). The strains were also positive for pectinase, xylanase and amylase activity, while 91 and 86 isolates were positive for cellulase and β-mannanase, respectively. Only 21 isolates producing extracellular tannase were selected for further characterization. Identification by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that more than 50% (11 of 21 isolates) were Bacillus tequilensis, whereas the remaining were B. siamensis (3), B. megaterium (3), B. aryabhattai (3) and B. toyonensis (1). B. tequilensis K34.2 produced the highest extracellular tannase activity of 0.60 U/mL after cultivation at 37 °C for 48 h. In addition, all 21 isolates were resistant to 0.3% (w/v) bile salt, sensitive to gentamicin, erythromycin, vancomycin and kanamycin and also tolerant to acidic condition. Cell hydrophobicity varied from 9.4 to 80.4% and neutralized culture supernatants of some Bacillus isolates showed bacteriocin producing potentiality against Samonella enterica serovar Typhimurium TISTR 292. All tested probiotic properties indicated that B. tequilensis K19.3, B. tequilensis K34.2 and B. siamensis K19.1 had high probiotic potential. This is the first report describing tannin-tolerant Bacillus and their extracellular tannase producing capability in Miang, a traditional fermented tea of Thailand. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microorganisms with Probiotic Properties)
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Open AccessArticle
Potential Probiotic Yeasts Sourced from Natural Environmental and Spontaneous Processed Foods
Foods 2020, 9(3), 287; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9030287 - 04 Mar 2020
Cited by 4
Abstract
In the last decades, there has been a growing interest from consumers in their food choices. Organic, natural, less processed, functional, and pre-probiotic products were preferred. Although, Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii is the most well-characterized probiotic yeast available on the market, improvement in [...] Read more.
In the last decades, there has been a growing interest from consumers in their food choices. Organic, natural, less processed, functional, and pre-probiotic products were preferred. Although, Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii is the most well-characterized probiotic yeast available on the market, improvement in probiotic function using other yeast species is an attractive future direction. In the present study, un-anthropized natural environments and spontaneous processed foods were exploited for wild yeast isolation with the goal of amplifying the knowledge of probiotic aptitudes of different yeast species. For this purpose, 179 yeast species were isolated, identified as belonging to twelve different genera, and characterized for the most important probiotic features. Findings showed interesting probiotic characteristics for some yeast strains belonging to Lachancea thermotolerans, Metschnikowia ziziphicola, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Torulaspora delbrueckii species, although these probiotic aptitudes were strictly strain-dependent. These yeast strains could be proposed for different probiotic applications, such as a valid alternative to, or in combination with, the probiotic yeast S. cerevisiae var. boulardii. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microorganisms with Probiotic Properties)
Open AccessArticle
Screening and Spontaneous Mutation of Pickle-Derived Lactobacillus plantarum with Overproduction of Riboflavin, Related Mechanism, and Food Application
Foods 2020, 9(1), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9010088 - 14 Jan 2020
Cited by 6
Abstract
Riboflavin, also known as vitamin B2, plays an important role in human cell metabolism and participates in various redox reactions and in energy utilization. In this study, 90 riboflavin-producing lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were screened out from pickle juices. The yields of riboflavin [...] Read more.
Riboflavin, also known as vitamin B2, plays an important role in human cell metabolism and participates in various redox reactions and in energy utilization. In this study, 90 riboflavin-producing lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were screened out from pickle juices. The yields of riboflavin in these LAB were about 0.096–0.700 mg/L, and one strain, Lactobacillus plantarum RYG-YYG-9049, was found to produce the highest riboflavin content. Next, roseoflavin was used to induce the spontaneous mutation of RYG-YYG-9049, and selected roseoflavin-resistant colonies generally produced higher riboflavin contents, ranging from 1.013 to 2.332 mg/L. The No. 10 mutant, L. plantarum RYG-YYG-9049-M10, had the highest riboflavin content. Next, the molecular mechanism of enhancing riboflavin production in RYG-YYG-9049-M10 was explored, leading to the finding that roseoflavin treatment did not change the rib operons including the ribA, ribB, ribC, ribH, and ribG genes. Unexpectedly, however, this mechanism did induce an insertion of a 1059-bp DNA fragment in the upstream regulatory region of the rib operon, as compared to the wild-type RYG-YYG-9049. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that roseoflavin could induce an insertion of DNA fragment in LAB to increase riboflavin content, representing a new mutation type that is induced by roseoflavin. Finally, in order to fortify riboflavin content in soymilk, RYG-YYG-9049 and RYG-YYG-9049-M10 were used to ferment soymilk, and several fermentation parameters were optimized to obtain the fermented soymilk with riboflavin contents of up to 2.920 mg/L. In general, roseoflavin induction is an economical and feasible biotechnological strategy to induce riboflavin-overproducing LAB, and this strategy can be used to develop LAB-fermented functional foods that are rich in riboflavin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microorganisms with Probiotic Properties)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Latilactobacillus curvatus: A Candidate Probiotic with Excellent Fermentation Properties and Health Benefits
Foods 2020, 9(10), 1366; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9101366 - 25 Sep 2020
Abstract
Latilactobacillus curvatus is a candidate probiotic that has been included in the list of recommended biological agents for certification by the European Food Safety Authority. According to the published genomic information, L. curvatus has several genes that encode metabolic pathways of carbohydrate utilization. [...] Read more.
Latilactobacillus curvatus is a candidate probiotic that has been included in the list of recommended biological agents for certification by the European Food Safety Authority. According to the published genomic information, L. curvatus has several genes that encode metabolic pathways of carbohydrate utilization. In addition, there are some differences in cell surface complex related genes of L. curvatus from different sources. L. curvatus also has several genes that encode bacteriocin production, which can produce Curvacin A and Sakacin P. Due to its ability to produce bacteriocin, it is often used as a bioprotective agent in fermented meat products, to inhibit the growth of a variety of pathogenic and spoilage bacteria. L. curvatus exerts some probiotic effects, such as mediating the production of IL-10 by dendritic cells through NF-κB and extracellular regulated protein kinases (ERK) signals to relieve colitis in mice. This review is the first summary of the genomic and biological characteristics of L. curvatus. Our knowledge on its role in the food industry and human health is also discussed, with the aim of providing a theoretical basis for the development of applications of L. curvatus. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microorganisms with Probiotic Properties)
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Open AccessReview
Dietary Components, Microbial Metabolites and Human Health: Reading between the Lines
Foods 2020, 9(8), 1045; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9081045 - 03 Aug 2020
Abstract
Trillions of bacteria reside in the human gut and they metabolize dietary substances to obtain nutrients and energy while producing metabolites. Therefore, different dietary components could affect human health in various ways through microbial metabolism. Many such metabolites have been shown to affect [...] Read more.
Trillions of bacteria reside in the human gut and they metabolize dietary substances to obtain nutrients and energy while producing metabolites. Therefore, different dietary components could affect human health in various ways through microbial metabolism. Many such metabolites have been shown to affect human physiological activities, including short-chain fatty acids metabolized from carbohydrates; indole, kynurenic acid and para-cresol, metabolized from amino acids; conjugated linoleic acid and linoleic acid, metabolized from lipids. Here, we review the features of these metabolites and summarize the possible molecular mechanisms of their metabolisms by gut microbiota. We discuss the potential roles of these metabolites in health and diseases, and the interactions between host metabolism and the gut microbiota. We also show some of the major dietary patterns around the world and hope this review can provide insights into our eating habits and improve consumers’ health conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microorganisms with Probiotic Properties)
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