Functional Foods with Modulating Action on Metabolic Risk Factors

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 October 2023) | Viewed by 33123

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Laboratory of Food Microbiology, Department of Nutrition, Health Sciences Center, Federal University of Paraíba, João Pessoa 58051-900, Paraíba, Brazil
Interests: food safety; control of foodborne pathogens; antimicrobial compounds; bioactive molecules; probiotics; prebiotics; edible coatings; intestinal microbial ecology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Nutrition, Health Sciences Center, Federal University of Paraíba, João Pessoa 58051-900, Paraíba, Brazil
Interests: gut microbiota; probiotics; nutrition; arterial hypertension; metabolic disease; translational studies
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Health-related metabolic risk factors, such as increased blood pressure, hyperglycemia, obesity, and dyslipidemias, can lead to metabolic syndrome and enhanced risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, and death. In recent years, there has been increasing evidence that functional foods, food components, and bioactive molecules from the plant, animal, and microbial origins can exert preventive and therapeutic benefits for human health by modulating the host metabolism, physiology, nutrition, and immune functions. For this Special Issue of Foods, we are inviting the submission of manuscripts that join efforts to present and compile the effects of traditional and emerging functional foods and food components on the metabolic risk factors in a translational perspective by combining in vitro, ex vivo, and animal studies, and or clinical trials/approaches. Original and unpublished research and highest-quality review papers addressing the physiology, cellular, genomics, and molecular mechanisms underlying the modulating action of functional foods and food components on inflammation, dyslipidemias, blood pressure, oxidative stress, and immune and endocrine signaling pathways are encouraged. 

Dr. Evandro Leite de Souza
Prof. Dr. José Luiz de Brito Alves
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • plant foods
  • animal foods
  • microbial origin foods
  • food components
  • dyslipidemias
  • type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • obesity
  • raised blood pressure
  • oxidative stress
  • inflammation

Published Papers (12 papers)

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Editorial

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3 pages, 203 KiB  
Editorial
Functional Foods with Modulating Action on Metabolic Risk Factors
by José Luiz de Brito Alves and Evandro Leite de Souza
Foods 2023, 12(21), 4043; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12214043 - 6 Nov 2023
Viewed by 871
Abstract
Health-related metabolic risk factors, such as elevated blood pressure, hyperglycemia, obesity, and dyslipidemia, can lead to metabolic syndrome and increased risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, and death [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Foods with Modulating Action on Metabolic Risk Factors)

Research

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11 pages, 492 KiB  
Article
Effect of Yogurt Ice Cream on the Viability and Antidiabetic Potential of the Probiotics Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lacticaseibacillus rhamnosus, and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis after In Vitro Digestion
by Rinrada Talearngkul, Sudathip Sae-tan and Jintana Sirivarasai
Foods 2023, 12(23), 4373; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12234373 - 4 Dec 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1445
Abstract
Probiotics can ameliorate type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) via several mechanisms such as by decreasing inflammatory cytokines and increasing pancreatic β-cell functions. Another targeted mechanism for managing T2DM involves inhibiting α-amylase and α-glucosidase, which exhibit antioxidant activity and affect carbohydrate metabolism by delaying [...] Read more.
Probiotics can ameliorate type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) via several mechanisms such as by decreasing inflammatory cytokines and increasing pancreatic β-cell functions. Another targeted mechanism for managing T2DM involves inhibiting α-amylase and α-glucosidase, which exhibit antioxidant activity and affect carbohydrate metabolism by delaying carbohydrate digestion, thus mitigating glucose in the circulation. Dairy products are effective matrices for delivering probiotics through the gastrointestinal tract. We compared the viability and antioxidant activity of the probiotics Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5, Lacticaseibacillus rhamnosus GG, and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis in yogurt ice cream after in vitro digestion and compared α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibition activities. Lacticaseibacillus rhamnosus GG had the highest viability after in vitro digestion (oral, gastric, and intestinal). Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5 and Lacticaseibacillus rhamnosus GG exhibited the highest percentages of α-glucosidase (16.37% ± 0.32%) and α-amylase (41.37% ± 0.61%) inhibition. Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 and Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5 showed the highest antioxidant activities via the α,α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl free radical-scavenging method and ferric-reducing antioxidant power assay, respectively. These findings suggest that yogurt ice cream can provide a suitable matrix for the delivery of probiotics from dairy culture to promote intestinal homeostasis with probiotic benefits in the host as well as a potential functional food to help reduce postprandial hyperglycaemia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Foods with Modulating Action on Metabolic Risk Factors)
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15 pages, 2822 KiB  
Article
Influence of Isoflavones and Probiotics on Magnesium Status in Healthy Female Rats
by Iskandar Azmy Harahap, Maciej Kuligowski, Marcin Schmidt, Paweł Kurzawa and Joanna Suliburska
Foods 2023, 12(21), 3908; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12213908 - 25 Oct 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 987
Abstract
Isoflavones and probiotics are promising nutrients for bone health, and magnesium (Mg) is essential for bone metabolism. This study aimed to determine the effects of daidzein, genistein and Lactobacillus acidophilus on the Mg status of healthy female rats. Forty-eight rats were randomly assigned [...] Read more.
Isoflavones and probiotics are promising nutrients for bone health, and magnesium (Mg) is essential for bone metabolism. This study aimed to determine the effects of daidzein, genistein and Lactobacillus acidophilus on the Mg status of healthy female rats. Forty-eight rats were randomly assigned to six groups, with the control group receiving a standard diet (AIN 93M). The remaining groups were fed the same diet with added ingredients such as tempeh flour; soy flour; pure daidzein and genistein; L. acidophilus or a combination of daidzein, genistein, and L. acidophilus. Tissue samples were collected after the eight-week intervention, and Mg concentrations were analysed using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Myeloid and erythroid cells were determined using the haematoxylin and eosin bone staining method. Statistical analyses were conducted using one-way ANOVA with Tukey’s post hoc test and Pearson’s correlation coefficient. The threshold for significance was p < 0.05. Compared with the control group, adding tempeh to the diet of rats resulted in significant changes in Mg concentrations in various tissues, with a decrease in the kidneys and an increase in the fur. Although not statistically significant compared to the control group, the tempeh group showed increased Mg concentrations in the femur and spleen. The myeloid-to-erythroid cell ratio did not differ significantly among groups, but all intervention groups showed higher ratios than the control group. A strong negative correlation was observed between Mg concentrations in the kidneys and fur. Conversely, a positive correlation was identified between Mg concentrations in the pancreas and fur. Daily consumption of tempeh may improve Mg status in the organism. Intake of pure daidzein, genistein, or probiotic seems to have no effect on Mg concentrations in healthy rats. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Foods with Modulating Action on Metabolic Risk Factors)
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16 pages, 7308 KiB  
Article
Mei-Gin Formula Ameliorates Obesity through Lipolysis, Fatty Oxidation, and Thermogenesis in High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Rats
by Hsin-Lin Cheng, Wei-Tang Chang, Jiun-Ling Lin, Chun-Tse Tsai, Ming-Ching Cheng, Shih-Chien Huang, Yue-Ching Wong and Chin-Lin Hsu
Foods 2023, 12(19), 3539; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12193539 - 22 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1071
Abstract
Obesity is a metabolic dysfunction characterized by excessive body fat deposition as a consequence of an energy imbalance. Novel therapeutic strategies have emerged that are safe and have comparatively low side effects for obesity treatment. Functional foods and nutraceuticals have recently received a [...] Read more.
Obesity is a metabolic dysfunction characterized by excessive body fat deposition as a consequence of an energy imbalance. Novel therapeutic strategies have emerged that are safe and have comparatively low side effects for obesity treatment. Functional foods and nutraceuticals have recently received a great deal of attention because of their components with the properties of antimetabolic syndrome. Based on our previous in vitro and in vivo investigations on anti-adipogenesis activity and improved body fat accumulation in serials, the combination of three ingredients (including bainiku-ekisu, black garlic, and Mesona procumbens Hemsl), comprising the Mei-Gin formula (MGF), was eventually selected as a novel inhibitor that exhibited preventive effects against obesity. Herein, we verify the anti-obesity effects of MGF in obese rats induced by a high-fat diet and discuss the potential molecular mechanisms underlying obesity development. Oral administration of MGF significantly suppressed the final body weight, weight change, energy and water intake, subcutaneous and visceral fat mass, liver weight, hepatic total lipids and triglycerides (TG), and serum levels of TG, triglycerides (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), alanine transaminase (AST), uric acid, and ketone bodies and augmented fecal total lipids, TG, and cholesterol excretion in the high-dose MGF-supplemented groups. Furthermore, the corresponding lipid metabolic pathways revealed that MGF supplementation effectively increased lipolysis and fatty acid oxidation gene expression and attenuated fatty acid synthesis gene expression in the white adipose tissue (WAT) and liver and it also increased mitochondrial activation and thermogenic gene expression in the brown adipose tissue (BAT) of rats with obesity induced by a high-fat diet (HFD). These results demonstrate that the intake of MGF can be beneficial for the suppression of HFD-induced obesity in rats through the lipolysis, fatty oxidation, and thermogenesis pathway. In conclusion, these results demonstrate the anti-obesity efficacy of MGF in vivo and suggest that MGF may act as a potential therapeutic agent against obesity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Foods with Modulating Action on Metabolic Risk Factors)
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11 pages, 3296 KiB  
Article
Predictive Modeling of Riboflavin Production in Lactiplantibacillus plantarum MTCC 25432 Using Fuzzy Inference System
by Vikram Kumar, Vinkel Kumar Arora, Ananya Rana, Ankur Kumar, Neetu Kumra Taneja and Jayesh J. Ahire
Foods 2023, 12(17), 3155; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12173155 - 22 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 882
Abstract
Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) is an essential vitamin and a microbial metabolite produced by some lactic acid bacteria (LAB). This investigation aims to study the overproduction of riboflavin in selected Lactiplantibacillus plantarum strain by using the one factor at a time (OFAT) [...] Read more.
Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) is an essential vitamin and a microbial metabolite produced by some lactic acid bacteria (LAB). This investigation aims to study the overproduction of riboflavin in selected Lactiplantibacillus plantarum strain by using the one factor at a time (OFAT) tool coupled with the Fuzzy Inference System (FIS) and its validation through fermentative production in semi-defined media. Out of three Lactiplantibacillus strains used in this study, the maximum riboflavin producing strain was selected based on its ability to grow and produce higher levels of riboflavin. In results, Lactiplantibacillus plantarum strain MTCC 25432 was able to produce 346 µg/L riboflavin in riboflavin deficient assay medium and was investigated further. By using the OFAT–fuzzy FIS system, casamino acid in the range of 5–20 g/L, GTP 0.01–0.04 g/L, sodium acetate 5–15 g/L, and glycine 5–15 g/L were used to predict their effect on riboflavin production. The conditions optimized with modeling showed a 24% increment in riboflavin production (429 µg/L) by Lactiplantibacillus plantarum MTCC 25432 vis-a-vis the unoptimized counterpart (346 µg/L). In conclusion, an FIS-based predictive model was effectively implemented to estimate the riboflavin within an acceptable limit of 3.4%. Riboflavin production enhancing effects observed with various levels of sodium acetate, casamino acid, and GTP could be useful to re-design matrices for riboflavin production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Foods with Modulating Action on Metabolic Risk Factors)
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18 pages, 2963 KiB  
Article
Nutritional Characterization, Antioxidant, and Lipid-Lowering Effects of Yellow Mombin (Spondias mombin) Supplemented to Rats Fed a High-Fat Diet
by Tatiana Luiza Costa Lucena, Kamila Sabino Batista, Rafael Oliveira Pinheiro, Hassler Clementino Cavalcante, Jéssyca Alencar de Sousa Gomes, Laiane Alves da Silva, Priscilla Paulo Lins, Fabrícia Souza Ferreira, Rafael Ferreira Lima, Marcos dos Santos Lima and Jailane de Souza Aquino
Foods 2022, 11(19), 3064; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11193064 - 2 Oct 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1845
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of supplementing yellow mombin (YM) on the oxidative, somatic, and lipid parameters in rats fed a high-fat diet. A total of 24 adult Wistar rats were randomized into three groups: normal-fat diet (NF), [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of supplementing yellow mombin (YM) on the oxidative, somatic, and lipid parameters in rats fed a high-fat diet. A total of 24 adult Wistar rats were randomized into three groups: normal-fat diet (NF), high-fat diet (HF), and high-fat diet with YM supplementation (HFYM). Diets were administered for four weeks, and YM (400 mg/kg) was supplemented via gavage in the last two weeks of the experiment. After the four-week period, the somatic, serum biochemical, and liver oxidative parameters were evaluated. YM has a high antioxidant activity and significant amounts of phenolic compounds, carotenoids, vitamin C, dietary fibre, and minerals. The HFYM group had the lowest body weight (18.75%), body mass index (17.74%), and adiposity (31.63%) compared with the HF group. YM supplementation reduced low-density lipoprotein by 43.05% and increased high-density lipoprotein by 25.73%, but did not improve the triglyceride levels in the serum. YM treatment improved glucose tolerance and lipid peroxidation, and also enhanced the antioxidant capacity, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase activities in the liver. These results indicate the lipid-lowering property and potential antioxidant activity of YM against liver oxidative damage caused by a high-fat diet intake, which may be associated with the bioactive compounds present in this fruit. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Foods with Modulating Action on Metabolic Risk Factors)
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14 pages, 3135 KiB  
Article
Effects of Hydroxy-Alpha-Sanshool on Intestinal Metabolism in Insulin-Resistant Mice
by Fangyan Xu, Yuping Zhu, Mintao Lu, Likang Qin, Degang Zhao and Tingyuan Ren
Foods 2022, 11(14), 2040; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11142040 - 10 Jul 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 1821
Abstract
To explore the hydroxy-alpha-sanshool (HAS) effects on the intestinal metabolites of insulin-resistant mice, the blank group (BG), model group (MG), and HAS dose group (DG) were designed. The insulin resistance (IR) model was induced through streptozotocin (STZ) combined with a high-fat and high-sugar [...] Read more.
To explore the hydroxy-alpha-sanshool (HAS) effects on the intestinal metabolites of insulin-resistant mice, the blank group (BG), model group (MG), and HAS dose group (DG) were designed. The insulin resistance (IR) model was induced through streptozotocin (STZ) combined with a high-fat and high-sugar diet. Based on the availability of the model, the HAS dose was given by gavage for 28 days. The determination of cecum and key serum indexes was made, including the contents of insulin (INS), triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), glycosylated serum protein (GSP), and glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb). The changes in gut microbiota and metabolites in cecal contents were detected by 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and UPLC/HRMS technology, respectively. The results that the levels of GSP, GHb, TG, and TC were significantly increased; this was not the case for INS; or for the changes in the gut microbiota and metabolites in MG. However, the intervention of HAS effectively reversed these changes, for instance, it decreased levels of GSP, GHb, TG, TC, and alterations of metabolite composition for linoleic acid and tyrosine metabolism and recovered trends of declining species diversity and richness of the gut microbiota in MG. It was indicated that HAS alleviated IR by regulating the gut microbiota and metabolites and affecting lipid and amino acid metabolism pathways. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Foods with Modulating Action on Metabolic Risk Factors)
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Review

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28 pages, 948 KiB  
Review
Evidence for the Beneficial Effects of Brazilian Native Fruits and Their By-Products on Human Intestinal Microbiota and Repercussions on Non-Communicable Chronic Diseases—A Review
by Maiara da Costa Lima, Heloísa Maria Almeida do Nascimento, Jaielison Yandro Pereira da Silva, José Luiz de Brito Alves and Evandro Leite de Souza
Foods 2023, 12(18), 3491; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12183491 - 19 Sep 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1966
Abstract
Non-communicable chronic diseases (NCDs) are the most widespread cause of mortality worldwide. Intestinal microbiota balance can be altered by changes in the abundance and/or diversity of intestinal microbiota, indicating a role of intestinal microbiota in NCD development. This review discusses the findings of [...] Read more.
Non-communicable chronic diseases (NCDs) are the most widespread cause of mortality worldwide. Intestinal microbiota balance can be altered by changes in the abundance and/or diversity of intestinal microbiota, indicating a role of intestinal microbiota in NCD development. This review discusses the findings of in vitro studies, pre-clinical studies and clinical trials on the effects of Brazilian native fruits, their by-products, as well as their bioactive compounds on human intestinal microbiota and NCD. The major bioactive compounds in Brazilian native fruits and their by-products, and the impacts of their administration on outcomes linked to intestinal microbiota modulation are discussed. Mechanisms of intestinal microbiota affecting NCD could be linked to the modulation of absorption and energy balance, immune and endocrine systems, and inflammatory response. Brazilian native fruits, such as acerola, açaí, baru, buriti, guava, jabuticaba, juçara, and passion fruit, have several bioactive compounds, soluble and insoluble fibers, and a variety of phenolic compounds, which are capable of changing these key mechanisms. Brazilian native fruits and their by-products can help to promote positive intestinal and systemic health benefits by driving alterations in the composition of the human intestinal microbiota, and increasing the production of distinct short-chain fatty acids and phenolic metabolites, thereby enhancing intestinal integrity and homeostasis. Evidence from available literature shows that the modulatory impacts of Brazilian native fruits and their by-products on the composition and metabolic activity of the intestinal microbiota could improve several clinical repercussions associated with NCD, reinforcing the influence of intestinal microbiota in extra-intestinal outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Foods with Modulating Action on Metabolic Risk Factors)
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16 pages, 446 KiB  
Review
Mechanism of Anti-Diabetic Activity from Sweet Potato (Ipomoea batatas): A Systematic Review
by Cokorda Istri Sri Arisanti, I. Made Agus Gelgel Wirasuta, Ida Musfiroh, Emmy Hainida Khairul Ikram and Muchtaridi Muchtaridi
Foods 2023, 12(14), 2810; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12142810 - 24 Jul 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 4096
Abstract
This study aims to provide an overview of the compounds found in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) that contribute to its anti-diabetic activity and the mechanisms by which they act. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using electronic databases, such as PubMed, [...] Read more.
This study aims to provide an overview of the compounds found in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) that contribute to its anti-diabetic activity and the mechanisms by which they act. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using electronic databases, such as PubMed, Scopus, and Science Direct, with specific search terms and Boolean operators. A total of 269 articles were initially retrieved, but after applying inclusion and exclusion criteria only 28 articles were selected for further review. Among the findings, four varieties of sweet potato were identified as having potential anti-diabetic properties. Phenolic acids, flavonols, flavanones, and anthocyanidins are responsible for the anti-diabetic activity of sweet potatoes. The anti-diabetic mechanism of sweet potatoes was determined using a combination of components with multi-target actions. The results of these studies provide evidence that Ipomoea batatas is effective in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Foods with Modulating Action on Metabolic Risk Factors)
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20 pages, 1670 KiB  
Review
Effects of Regular Brazil Nut (Bertholletia excelsa H.B.K.) Consumption on Health: A Systematic Review of Clinical Trials
by Alessandra da Silva, Brenda Kelly Souza Silveira, Brenda Vieira Machado de Freitas, Helen Hermana M. Hermsdorff and Josefina Bressan
Foods 2022, 11(18), 2925; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11182925 - 19 Sep 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 6444
Abstract
The Brazil nut (BN) is a promising food due to its numerous health benefits, but it is still necessary to systematically review the scientific evidence on these benefits. Thus, we examined the effects of regular BN consumption on health markers in humans according [...] Read more.
The Brazil nut (BN) is a promising food due to its numerous health benefits, but it is still necessary to systematically review the scientific evidence on these benefits. Thus, we examined the effects of regular BN consumption on health markers in humans according to the health state (with specific diseases or not) of the subjects. PubMed, Embase®, and Scielo databases were used to search for clinical trials. The PRISMA guideline was used to report the review, and the risk of bias for all studies was assessed. Twenty-four studies were included in the present review, of which fifteen were non-randomized. BNs were consumed in the context of a habitual free-living diet in all studies. Improvement in antioxidant status through increased levels of selenium and/or glutathione peroxidase activity in plasma, serum, whole blood, and/or erythrocytes was observed in all studies that evaluated antioxidant status, regardless of the health state of the sample. In addition, healthy subjects improved lipid markers and fasting glucose. Subjects with obesity had improvement in markers of lipid metabolism. Subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus or dyslipidemia improved oxidative stress or DNA damage. Subjects undergoing hemodialysis benefited greatly from BN consumption, as they improved lipid profile markers, oxidative stress, inflammation, and thyroid function. Older adults with mild cognitive impairment improved verbal fluency and constructional praxis, and controversial results regarding the change in a marker of lipid peroxidation were observed in subjects with coronary artery disease. In conclusion, the benefits of BN consumption were found in different pathways of action and study populations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Foods with Modulating Action on Metabolic Risk Factors)
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17 pages, 1331 KiB  
Review
Evidence for Quercetin as a Dietary Supplement for the Treatment of Cardio-Metabolic Diseases in Pregnancy: A Review in Rodent Models
by Paulo César Trindade da Costa, Evandro Leite de Souza, Diego Cabral Lacerda, José Patrocínio Ribeiro Cruz Neto, Ludmilla Christine Silva de Sales, Cristiane Cosmo Silva Luis, Paula Brielle Pontes, Marinaldo Pacífico Cavalcanti Neto and José Luiz de Brito Alves
Foods 2022, 11(18), 2772; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11182772 - 8 Sep 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 5686
Abstract
Quercetin supplementation during pregnancy and lactation has been linked to a lower risk of maternal cardio-metabolic disorders such as gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), dyslipidemia, preeclampsia, attenuation of malnutrition-related conditions, and gestational obesity in animal studies. Pre-clinical studies have shown that maternal supplementation with [...] Read more.
Quercetin supplementation during pregnancy and lactation has been linked to a lower risk of maternal cardio-metabolic disorders such as gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), dyslipidemia, preeclampsia, attenuation of malnutrition-related conditions, and gestational obesity in animal studies. Pre-clinical studies have shown that maternal supplementation with quercetin reduces cardio-metabolic diseases in dams and rodents’ offspring, emphasizing its role in modifying phenotypic plasticity. In this sense, it could be inferred that quercetin administration during pregnancy and lactation is a viable strategy for changing cardio-metabolic parameters throughout life. Epigenetic mechanisms affecting the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3 K) pathways could be associated with these changes. To highlight these discoveries, this review outlines the understanding from animal studies investigations about quercetin supplementation and its capacity to prevent or decrease maternal and offspring cardio-metabolic illnesses and associated comorbidities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Foods with Modulating Action on Metabolic Risk Factors)
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32 pages, 1691 KiB  
Review
Hibiscus sabdariffa in Diabetes Prevention and Treatment—Does It Work? An Evidence-Based Review
by Daniel Jamrozik, Weronika Borymska and Ilona Kaczmarczyk-Żebrowska
Foods 2022, 11(14), 2134; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11142134 - 19 Jul 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 5087
Abstract
Diabetes is currently a global health problem that is already reported as an epidemic. This metabolic disease, characterized by a disturbance in the carbohydrate, protein, and lipid metabolism, is often accompanied by disorders of several organs. Its treatment is expensive and often difficult [...] Read more.
Diabetes is currently a global health problem that is already reported as an epidemic. This metabolic disease, characterized by a disturbance in the carbohydrate, protein, and lipid metabolism, is often accompanied by disorders of several organs. Its treatment is expensive and often difficult to control. Therefore, it seems necessary to search for new drugs and solutions to facilitate therapy and reduce treatment costs. Herbal medicines are becoming more and more popular. Hibiscus sabdariffa (roselle) is a plant that grows wild in a tropical climate. It has been used in folk medicine for thousands of years. Thanks to the numerous active compounds, including polyphenols, polysaccharides, organic acids, or pectins, it is reported to exhibit hypoglycemic, antioxidant, hypotensive, and anti-lipidemic activities and numerous indirect effects that are related to them. The aim of this review was to update the knowledge about the therapeutic effects of roselle in diabetes and its comorbidities based on in vitro, animal, and human studies. After a careful analysis of the scientific literature, it can be stated that roselle is a promising product that can be used either on its own or as an addition to the conventional treatment regimens to prevent or treat diabetes and its accompanying diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Foods with Modulating Action on Metabolic Risk Factors)
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