Recent Progress on Multifunctional Food Packaging and Film Applications

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Packaging and Preservation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 2656

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Vinca Institute for Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia
Interests: polysaccharides; edible films; proteins; food packaging
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Sciences for Healthcare Nutrition and Dietetica School, Universidad San Sebastián, Campus Las Tres Pascualas, Concepción 4030000, Chile
Interests: hydrogels; polysaccharides; biopolymers; polyphenols; biocomposites
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food packaging is a dynamic and growing end-use segment that continues to be impacted by new technologies, sustainability and regulations. The public's desire for a better, healthier life is driving many trends in this area. In addition, increasing awareness about the negative impact of plastic food packaging on the environment has led to an exponential research growth of novel environmentally friendly packaging materials. In this context, significant attention is given to identifying new renewable resources to produce sustainable, biodegradable films and packages, while developing and incorporating biobased additives into food packages.

In this Special Issue, we are encouraging the submission of manuscripts in relation to the following: (i) new technologies to obtain sustainable food packaging materials; (ii) studies based on biopolymers to obtain innovative films and food packages; (iii) the application of nanotechnology in the food packaging sector; (iv) the incorporation of bioactive compounds in food packaging materials; (v) the application of biobased adhesives into food packages; (vi) studies of additive migration from food packaging materials; and (vii) the influence of food packaging material on the quality and shelf-life of food products. In summary, this Special Issue of Foods is dedicated to original research and review articles that cover the latest findings on multi-functional and sustainable packaging materials and new eco-friendly processes (casting, electrospinning, supercritical drying, 3D printing, film extrusion, etc.).

Dr. Aleksandra Nesic
Prof. Dr. Gustavo Cabrera-Barjas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • food packaging materials
  • polysaccharides
  • edible films
  • bioplastic
  • biobased antimicrobials
  • composite materials
  • nanotechnology
  • bio-adhesives

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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16 pages, 1411 KiB  
Article
Improving Biodegradable Films from Corn Bran Arabinoxylan for Hydrophobic Material and Green Food Packaging
by Abdulrahman Alahmed and Senay Simsek
Foods 2024, 13(12), 1914; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13121914 - 18 Jun 2024
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Abstract
Non-biodegradable plastic materials pose environmental hazards and contribute to pollution. Arabinoxylan (AX) films have been created for applications in food packaging to replace these materials. The water interaction characteristics of biodegradable AX films were assessed following the extraction of AX from dry-milled corn [...] Read more.
Non-biodegradable plastic materials pose environmental hazards and contribute to pollution. Arabinoxylan (AX) films have been created for applications in food packaging to replace these materials. The water interaction characteristics of biodegradable AX films were assessed following the extraction of AX from dry-milled corn bran (DCB), wet-milled corn bran (WCB), and dried distiller’s grains with solubles (DDGS). Films were prepared with laccase and sorbitol before surface modification with lipase–vinyl acetate. Water solubility of the modified DCB films was significantly reduced (p < 0.05); however, the water solubility of modified WCB films decreased insignificantly (p > 0.05) compared to unmodified films. Water vapor permeability of the modified AX films from WCB and DDGS was significantly reduced (p < 0.05), unlike their unmodified counterparts. The biodegradation rates of the modified WCB AX and DDGS films increased after 63 and 99 days, respectively, compared to the unmodified films. The hydrophilic nature of AX polymers from WCB and DDGS enhances the biodegradability of the films. This study found that the modified WCB AX film was more hydrophobic, and the modified DDGS AX film was more biodegradable than the modified DCB AX film. Overall, surface modifications have potential for improving hydrophobicity of biopolymer films. Full article
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Review

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24 pages, 1780 KiB  
Review
Recent Approaches to the Formulation, Uses, and Impact of Edible Coatings on Fresh Peach Fruit
by Muhammad Aaqil, Chunxiu Peng, Ayesha Kamal, Taufiq Nawaz and Jiashun Gong
Foods 2024, 13(2), 267; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13020267 - 15 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1944
Abstract
Peaches are among the most well-known fruits in the world due to their appealing taste and high nutritional value. Peach fruit, on the other hand, has a variety of postharvest quality issues like chilling injury symptoms, internal breakdown, weight loss, decay, shriveling, and [...] Read more.
Peaches are among the most well-known fruits in the world due to their appealing taste and high nutritional value. Peach fruit, on the other hand, has a variety of postharvest quality issues like chilling injury symptoms, internal breakdown, weight loss, decay, shriveling, and over-ripeness, which makes a challenging environment for industries and researchers to develop sophisticated strategies for fruit quality preservation and extending shelf life. All over the world, consumers prefer excellent-quality, high-nutritional-value, and long-lasting fresh fruits that are free of chemicals. An eco-friendly solution to this issue is the coating and filming of fresh produce with natural edible materials. The edible coating utilization eliminates the adulteration risk, presents fruit hygienically, and improves aesthetics. Coatings are used in a way that combines food chemistry and preservation technology. This review, therefore, examines a variety of natural coatings (proteins, lipids, polysaccharides, and composite) and their effects on the quality aspects of fresh peach fruit, as well as their advantages and mode of action. From this useful information, the processors could benefit in choosing the suitable edible coating material for a variety of fresh peach fruits and their application on a commercial scale. In addition, prospects of the application of natural coatings on peach fruit and gaps observed in the literature are identified. Full article
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