Special Issue "Haematological Neoplasms: Diagnosis and Management"

A special issue of Current Oncology (ISSN 1718-7729). This special issue belongs to the section "Hematology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2023 | Viewed by 1566

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Stefano Ascani
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Pathology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera Santa Maria di Terni, University of Perugia, 05100 Terni, Italy
Interests: hematopathology; immunohistochemistry; lymphoid neoplasms; myeloid neoplasms
Prof. Dr. Francesca Sanguedolce
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dr. Magda Zanelli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Pathology Unit, Azienda USL-IRCCS di Reggio Emilia, 42123 Reggio Emilia, Italy
Interests: surgical pathology; hematopathology; lymphomas; molecular pathology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The latest WHO Classification of Tumours of Haematopoietic and Lymphoid Tissues, 4th Edition, dates back to 2017, and there is a huge ongoing work for the new edition to be published within the coming years as part of the novel 5th Edition series. This work is focused on the analysis, discussion, and potential endorsement of the recent advances in the pathology and molecular biology of haematological neoplasms.

We are pleased to invite you to submit your research works to this Special Issue, which aims to shape the current landscape of the diagnosis and management of haematological neoplasms of both myeloid and lymphoid origin by critically assessing the more recent technological advances in the recognition of novel pathological entities, the detection of prognostic and predictive biomarkers, and the application of precision medicine tools.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) ancillary techniques (including immunohistochemistry, PCR-based methods, and cytogenetics), the identification of prognostic/predictive biomarkers, issues in the diagnosis/differential diagnosis of challenging entities, and the current role of pathology in tailored therapy and precision medicine.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Stefano Ascani
Prof. Dr. Francesca Sanguedolce
Dr. Magda Zanelli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Current Oncology is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • myeloid neoplasms
  • lymphoid neoplasms
  • pathology
  • molecular biology
  • precision medicine
  • biomarkers

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Cutaneous Involvement in Diseases with Plasma Cell Differentiation: Diagnostic Approach
Curr. Oncol. 2022, 29(5), 3026-3043; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29050246 - 24 Apr 2022
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Abstract
Neoplasms with plasma cell differentiation may occasionally involve the skin. Cutaneous lesions may represent the first sign of an underlying systemic plasma cell malignancy, such as multiple myeloma, or the skin itself may be the primary site of occurrence of a hematological tumor [...] Read more.
Neoplasms with plasma cell differentiation may occasionally involve the skin. Cutaneous lesions may represent the first sign of an underlying systemic plasma cell malignancy, such as multiple myeloma, or the skin itself may be the primary site of occurrence of a hematological tumor with plasma cell differentiation. Starting from examples encountered in our daily practice, we discussed the diagnostic approach pathologists and clinicians should use when faced with cutaneous lesions with plasma cell differentiation. Cases of primary cutaneous marginal zone lymphoma, localized primary amyloidosis/amyloidoma, and cutaneous manifestations (secondary either to multiple myeloma or to plasmablastic lymphoma) are discussed, focusing on the importance of the adequate patient’s work-up and precise clinicopathological correlation to get to the correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment. The pertinent literature has been reviewed, and the clinical presentation, pathological findings, main differential diagnoses, treatment, and outcome of neoplasms with plasma cell differentiation involving the skin are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Haematological Neoplasms: Diagnosis and Management)
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Review

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Review
Primary Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma of the Urinary Bladder: Update on a Rare Disease and Potential Diagnostic Pitfalls
Curr. Oncol. 2022, 29(2), 956-968; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29020081 - 10 Feb 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 589
Abstract
Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) represents the most frequent type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Globally, DLBCL is an aggressive disease, requiring an accurate diagnosis and prompt treatment. The diagnosis is often made on biopsy samples of a nodal mass, however, approximately 40% of DLBCL [...] Read more.
Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) represents the most frequent type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Globally, DLBCL is an aggressive disease, requiring an accurate diagnosis and prompt treatment. The diagnosis is often made on biopsy samples of a nodal mass, however, approximately 40% of DLBCL cases arise at extranodal sites. The most common extranodal site is the gastrointestinal tract, however any extranodal area may be primarily involved. Primary urinary bladder lymphoma represents only 0.2% of extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas, whereas secondary involvement of the urinary bladder by a systemic lymphoma is a more common event. Despite being rare, DLBCL is considered to represent the predominant primary urinary bladder lymphoma. The majority of cases reported in the bladder belong to the DLBCL, NOS group, and there are only rare cases of EBV-positive DLBCL, NOS. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on DLBCL primarily occurring in the urinary bladder, with the aim of increasing clinician and pathologist awareness on this aggressive lymphoma rarely arising in the urinary bladder. Additionally, we focus on those entities which should be taken into consideration in the differential diagnosis, highlighting potential diagnostic pitfalls. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Haematological Neoplasms: Diagnosis and Management)
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