Editor's Choice Articles

Editor’s Choice articles are based on recommendations by the scientific editors of MDPI journals from around the world. Editors select a small number of articles recently published in the journal that they believe will be particularly interesting to authors, or important in this field. The aim is to provide a snapshot of some of the most exciting work published in the various research areas of the journal.

Order results
Result details
Results per page
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Article

Article
Indications for Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy with Cytoreductive Surgery: A Clinical Practice Guideline
Curr. Oncol. 2020, 27(3), 146-154; https://doi.org/10.3747/co.27.6033 - 01 Jun 2020
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 691
Abstract
Objective: The purpose of the present review was to provide evidence-based guidance about the provision of cytoreductive surgery (crs) with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (hipec) in the treatment of peritoneal cancers. Methods: The guideline was developed by the Program in [...] Read more.
Objective: The purpose of the present review was to provide evidence-based guidance about the provision of cytoreductive surgery (crs) with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (hipec) in the treatment of peritoneal cancers. Methods: The guideline was developed by the Program in Evidence-Based Care together with the Surgical Oncology Program at Ontario Health (Cancer Care Ontario) through a systematic review of relevant literature, patient- and caregiver-specific consultation, and internal and external reviews. Results: Recommendation 1a: For patients with newly diagnosed stage iii primary epithelial ovarian or fallopian tube carcinoma, or primary peritoneal carcinoma, hipec should be considered for those with at least stable disease after neoadjuvant chemotherapy at the time that interval crs (if complete) or optimal cytoreduction is achieved. Recommendation 1b: There is insufficient evidence to recommend the addition of hipec when primary crs is performed for patients with newly diagnosed advanced primary epithelial ovarian or fallopian tube carcinoma, or primary peritoneal carcinoma, outside of a clinical trial. Recommendation 2: There is insufficient evidence to recommend hipec with crs in patients with recurrent ovarian cancer outside the context of a clinical trial. Recommendation 3: There is insufficient evidence to recommend hipec with crs in patients with peritoneal colorectal carcinomatosis outside the context of a clinical trial. Recommendation 4: There is insufficient evidence to recommend hipec with crs for the prevention of peritoneal carcinomatosis in colorectal cancer outside the context of a clinical trial; however, hipec using oxaliplatin is not recommended. Recommendation 5: There is insufficient evidence to recommend hipec with crs for the treatment of gastric peritoneal carcinomatosis outside the context of a clinical trial. Recommendation 6: There is insufficient evidence to recommend hipec with crs for the prevention of gastric peritoneal carcinomatosis outside the context of a clinical trial. Recommendation 7: There is insufficient evidence to recommend hipec with crs as a standard of care in patients with malignant peritoneal mesothelioma; however, patients should be referred to hipec specialty centres for assessment for treatment as part of an ongoing research protocol. Recommendation 8: There is insufficient evidence to recommend hipec with crs as a standard of care in patients with disseminated mucinous neoplasm in the appendix; however, patients should be referred to hipec specialty centres for assessment for treatment as part of an ongoing research protocol. Full article

Review

Review
A Review of Canadian Cancer-Related Clinical Practice Guidelines and Resources during the COVID-19 Pandemic
Curr. Oncol. 2021, 28(2), 1020-1033; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol28020100 - 25 Feb 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1654
Abstract
(1) Background: Preventive measures taken in response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic have adversely affected an entire range of cancer-related medical activities. The reallocation of medical resources, staff, and ambulatory services, as well as critical shortages in pharmaceutical and medical supplies [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Preventive measures taken in response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic have adversely affected an entire range of cancer-related medical activities. The reallocation of medical resources, staff, and ambulatory services, as well as critical shortages in pharmaceutical and medical supplies have compelled healthcare professionals to prioritize patients with cancer to treatment and screening services based on a set of classification criteria in cancer-related guidelines. Cancer patients themselves have been affected on multiple levels, and addressing their concerns poses another challenge to the oncology community. (2) Methods: We conducted a Canada-wide search of cancer-related clinical practice guidelines on the management and prioritization of individuals into treatment and screening services. We also outlined the resources provided by Canadian cancer charities and patient advocacy groups to provide cancer patients, or potential cancer patients, with useful information and valuable support resources. (3) Results: The identified provincial guidelines emphasized cancer care (i.e., treatment) more than cancer control (i.e., screening). For cancer-related resources, a clear significance was placed on knowledge & awareness and supportive resources, mainly relating to mental health. (4) Conclusion: We provided a guidance document outlining cancer-related guidelines and resources that are available to healthcare providers and patients across Canada during the COVID-19 pandemic. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review
Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Epidemiology, Screening, and Assessment of Hepatic Reserve
Curr. Oncol. 2020, 27(s3), 138-143; https://doi.org/10.3747/co.27.7181 - 01 Nov 2020
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 1333
Abstract
Hepatocellular carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. This review summarizes the epidemiology and causes of the disease, and the roles of screening and surveillance for early tumour detection. It also highlights the important role of assessment of hepatic reserve in [...] Read more.
Hepatocellular carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. This review summarizes the epidemiology and causes of the disease, and the roles of screening and surveillance for early tumour detection. It also highlights the important role of assessment of hepatic reserve in consideration of appropriate staging and treatment. Full article
Review
Multidisciplinary Management of Locally Advanced and Metastatic Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Curr. Oncol. 2020, 27(4), 399-407; https://doi.org/10.3747/co.27.6015 - 01 Aug 2020
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 1188
Abstract
Non-melanoma skin cancers are the most prevalent form of cancer, with cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) being the 2nd most common type. Patients presenting with high-risk lesions associated with locally advanced or metastatic cSCC face high rates of recurrence and mortality. [...] Read more.
Non-melanoma skin cancers are the most prevalent form of cancer, with cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) being the 2nd most common type. Patients presenting with high-risk lesions associated with locally advanced or metastatic cSCC face high rates of recurrence and mortality. Accurate staging and risk stratification for patients can be challenging because no system is universally accepted, and no Canadian guidelines currently exist. Patients with advanced cSCC are often deemed ineligible for either or both of curative surgery and radiation therapy (RT) and, until recently, were limited to off-label systemic cisplatin–fluorouracil or cetuximab therapy, which offers modest clinical benefits and potentially severe toxicity. A new systemic therapy, cemiplimab, has been approved for the treatment of locally advanced and metastatic cSCC. In the present review, we provide recommendations for patient classification and staging based on current guidelines, direction for determining patient eligibility for surgery and RT, and an overview of the available systemic treatment options for advanced cSCC and of the benefits of a multidisciplinary approach to patient management. Full article
Review
A Review of Cancer Immunotherapy: From the Past, to the Present, to the Future
Curr. Oncol. 2020, 27(s2), 87-97; https://doi.org/10.3747/co.27.5223 - 01 Apr 2020
Cited by 191 | Viewed by 7388
Abstract
Compared with previous standards of care (including chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgery), cancer immunotherapy has brought significant improvements for patients in terms of survival and quality of life. Immunotherapy has now firmly established itself as a novel pillar of cancer care, from the metastatic [...] Read more.
Compared with previous standards of care (including chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgery), cancer immunotherapy has brought significant improvements for patients in terms of survival and quality of life. Immunotherapy has now firmly established itself as a novel pillar of cancer care, from the metastatic stage to the adjuvant and neoadjuvant settings in numerous cancer types. In this review article, we highlight how the history of cancer immunotherapy paved the way for discoveries that are now part of the standard of care. We also highlight the current pitfalls and limitations of cancer checkpoint immunotherapy and how novel research in the fields of personalized cancer vaccines, autoimmunity, the microbiome, the tumour microenvironment, and metabolomics is aiming to solve those challenges. Full article
Review
Immunotherapy in Soft-Tissue Sarcoma
Curr. Oncol. 2020, 27(s1), 17-23; https://doi.org/10.3747/co.27.5407 - 01 Feb 2020
Cited by 33 | Viewed by 2398
Abstract
Soft-tissue sarcoma (sts) is a rare mesenchymal malignancy that accounts for less than 1% of all adult tumours. Despite the successful advancement of localized therapies such as surgery and radiotherapy, these tumours can, for many, recur—often with metastatic disease. In the [...] Read more.
Soft-tissue sarcoma (sts) is a rare mesenchymal malignancy that accounts for less than 1% of all adult tumours. Despite the successful advancement of localized therapies such as surgery and radiotherapy, these tumours can, for many, recur—often with metastatic disease. In the advanced setting, the role of systemic therapies is modest and is associated with poor survival. With the discovery of immunotherapies in other tumour types such as melanoma and lung cancer, interest has been renewed in exploring immunotherapy in sts. The biology of some stss makes them ripe for immunotherapy intervention; for example, some stss might have chromosomal translocations resulting in pathognomonic fusion products that have been shown to express cancer/testis antigens. Here, we present a targeted review of the published data and ongoing clinical trials for immunotherapies in patients with sarcoma, which comprise immune checkpoint inhibitors, adoptive cell therapies, and cancer vaccines. Full article
Back to TopTop