Special Issue "New Frontiers in Head and Neck Oncology"

A special issue of Current Oncology (ISSN 1718-7729). This special issue belongs to the section "Head and Neck Oncology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 May 2022) | Viewed by 2925

Special Issue Editors

Dr. George Shenouda
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Guest Editor
Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montréal, QC, Canada
Interests: head and neck oncology; brain tumors
Prof. Dr. Denis Soulieres
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre de recherche du Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal (CR-CHUM) and Institut du cancer de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada
Interests: HNSCC; immunotherapy; biomarkers; mRCC; targeted therapy; DPYD
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Houda Bahig
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Associate Professor, Radiation Oncology, Universite de Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Interests: HNSCC; translational research; pharmacogenomics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The field of head and neck oncology is evolving very rapidly. The importance of achieving an uncomplicated cure has become very clear to all healthcare professionals in this area. Moreover, the continuously increasing incidence of HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer in young and usually healthy patients has stimulated significant clinical research to de-intensify treatment in current clinical trials around the world. At the same time, there is an increase in life expectancy and patients presenting with curable disease in their seventies and eighties. New therapeutic approaches are needed to provide adequate therapy in the context of treatment-related side effects. This is another area of urgent research to achieve a better therapeutic ratio without increasing patients’ symptoms burden. In addition, the importance of patient-reported outcomes (PRO) and QOL are essential components of all attempts to better understand the impact of treatment on patients and how we can improve their experience. 

Dr. George Shenouda
Prof. Dr. Denis Soulieres
Dr. Houda Bahig
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Head and neck cancer
  • Oropharyngeal HPV-related cancer
  • Treatment de-intensification
  • Patient-reported outcomes
  • Quality of Life

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Osseous Union after Mandible Reconstruction with Fibula Free Flap Using Manually Bent Plates vs. Patient-Specific Implants: A Retrospective Analysis of 89 Patients
Curr. Oncol. 2022, 29(5), 3375-3392; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29050274 - 06 May 2022
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Abstract
The aim of this monocentric, retrospective clinical study was to evaluate the status of osseous union in uni- and poly-segmental mandible reconstructions regarding conventional angle-stable manually bent osteosynthesis plates (Unilock 2.0 mm) versus titan laser-melted PSI patient-specific implant’s (PSI). The clinical impact of [...] Read more.
The aim of this monocentric, retrospective clinical study was to evaluate the status of osseous union in uni- and poly-segmental mandible reconstructions regarding conventional angle-stable manually bent osteosynthesis plates (Unilock 2.0 mm) versus titan laser-melted PSI patient-specific implant’s (PSI). The clinical impact of PSI’s high stiffness fixation methods on bone healing and regeneration is still not well addressed. The special interest was in evaluating the ossification of junctions between mandible and fibula and between osteotomized fibula free flap (FFF) segments. Panoramic radiograph (OPT), computed tomography (CT) scans, or cone-beam CTs (CBCT) of patients who underwent successful FFF for mandible reconstruction from January 2005 to December 2020 were analyzed. A total number of 89 cases (28 females (31.5%), 61 males (68.5%), mean age 58.2 ± 11.3 years, range: 22.8–82.7 years) fulfilled the chosen inclusion criteria for analysis (conventional: n = 44 vs. PSI: n = 45). The present study found an overall incomplete ossification (IOU) rate of 24.7% (conventional: 13.6% vs. PSI: 35.6%; p = 0.017) for mandible to fibula and intersegmental junctions. Between osteotomized FFF segments, an IOU rate of 16% was found in the PSI-group, while no IOU was recorded in the conventional group (p = 0.015). Significant differences were registered for IOU rates in poly-segmental (p = 0.041), and lateral (p = 0.016) mandibular reconstructions when PSI was used. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified plate exposure and type of plate used as independent risk factors for IOU. Previous or adjuvant radiotherapy did not impact incomplete osseous union in the evaluated study sample. PSI is more rigid than bent mini-plates and shields functional mechanical stimuli, and is the main reason for increasing the rate of incomplete ossification. To enhance the functional stimulus for ossification it has to be discussed if patient-specific implants can be designed to be thinner, and should be divided into segmental plates. This directs chewing forces through the bone and improves physiological bone remodeling. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Frontiers in Head and Neck Oncology)
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Article
Upfront DPYD Genotyping and Toxicity Associated with Fluoropyrimidine-Based Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Oropharyngeal Carcinomas: A Work in Progress
Curr. Oncol. 2022, 29(2), 497-509; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29020045 - 26 Jan 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 838
Abstract
Background: 5-FU-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) could be associated with severe treatment-related toxicities in patients harboring at-risk DPYD polymorphisms. Methods: The studied population included consecutive patients with locoregionally advanced oropharyngeal carcinoma treated with carboplatin and 5-FU-based CRT one year before and after the [...] Read more.
Background: 5-FU-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) could be associated with severe treatment-related toxicities in patients harboring at-risk DPYD polymorphisms. Methods: The studied population included consecutive patients with locoregionally advanced oropharyngeal carcinoma treated with carboplatin and 5-FU-based CRT one year before and after the implementation of upfront DPYD*2A genotyping. We aimed to determine the effect of DPYD genotyping on grade ≥3 toxicities. Results: 181 patients were analyzed (87 patients before and 94 patients following DPYD*2A screening). Of the patients, 91% (n = 86) were prospectively genotyped for the DPYD*2A allele. Of those screened, 2% (n = 2/87) demonstrated a heterozygous DPYD*2A mutation. Extended genotyping of DPYD*2A-negative patients later allowed for the retrospective identification of six additional patients with alternative DPYD variants (two c.2846A>T and four c.1236G>A mutations). Grade ≥3 toxicities occurred in 71% of the patients before DPYD*2A screening versus 62% following upfront genotyping (p = 0.18). When retrospectively analyzing additional non-DPYD*2A variants, the relative risks for mucositis (RR 2.36 [1.39–2.13], p = 0.0063), dysphagia (RR 2.89 [1.20–5.11], p = 0.019), and aspiration pneumonia (RR 13 [2.42–61.5)], p = 0.00065) were all significantly increased. Conclusion: The DPYD*2A, c.2846A>T, and c.1236G>A polymorphisms are associated with an increased risk of grade ≥3 toxicity to 5-FU. Upfront DPYD genotyping can identify patients in whom 5-FU-related toxicity should be avoided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Frontiers in Head and Neck Oncology)
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Article
Discrimination of Cancer Stem Cell Markers ALDH1A1, BCL11B, BMI-1, and CD44 in Different Tissues of HNSCC Patients
Curr. Oncol. 2021, 28(4), 2763-2774; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol28040241 - 19 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1018
Abstract
Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are accountable for the progress of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). This exploratory study evaluated the expression of molecular CSC markers in different tissues of HNSCC patients. Tissue specimens of primary tumor, lymph node metastases and macroscopically [...] Read more.
Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are accountable for the progress of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). This exploratory study evaluated the expression of molecular CSC markers in different tissues of HNSCC patients. Tissue specimens of primary tumor, lymph node metastases and macroscopically healthy mucosa of 12 consecutive HNSCC patients, that were treated with surgery and adjuvant radio(chemo)therapy upon indication, were collected. Samples were assessed for the expression of p16 as a surrogate for HPV-related disease and different molecular stem cell markers (ALDH1A1, BCL11B, BMI-1, and CD44). In the cohort, seven patients had HPV-related HNSCC; six thereof were oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. While expression of BMI-1 and BCL11B was significantly lower in healthy mucosa than both tumor and lymph node metastasis, there were no differences between tumor and lymph node metastasis. In the HPV-positive sub-cohort, these differences remained significant for BMI-1. However, no significant differences in these three tissues were found for ALDH1A1 and CD44. In conclusion, this exploratory study shows that CSC markers BMI-1 and BCL11B discriminate between healthy and cancerous tissue, whereas ALDH1A1 and CD44 were expressed to a comparable extent in healthy mucosa and cancerous tissues. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Frontiers in Head and Neck Oncology)
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