Special Issue "Hyperthermia-based Anticancer Treatments"

A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Nicolaas A.P. Franken

1. Laboratory of Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands
2. Department of Radiation Oncology, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Hyperthermia, Ionizing Radiation, DNA damage respons, biomarkers to predict radiation sensitivity, Radiation Sensitization, Cervical Cancer
Guest Editor
Dr. Arlene L. Oei

1. Laboratory of Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands
2. Department of Radiation Oncology, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands
E-Mail
Interests: Hyperthermia, Radiotherapy, Immunotherapy, Metastases Treatments, DNA damage response
Guest Editor
Dr. Johannes Crezee

Department of Radiation Oncology, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands
E-Mail
Interests: Hyperthermia, system design, treatment planning, clinical studies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Hyperthermia—an adjuvant anti-cancer treatment using temperatures exceeding the physiologically optimal level—affects cells and tissues in various ways. It can directly alter the physical properties of cellular components, but it can also influence cellular responses. The effectiveness of radiotherapy as well as chemotherapy can be enhanced substantially by hyperthermia, resulting in improved tumour control and prolonged disease-free survival. Moreover, hyperthermia does so without increasing radiation or chemo-related side-effects. For several decades hyperthermia has been successfully applied for treatment of many tumour types, including recurrent breast cancer, cervical carcinoma, head & neck cancer and melanoma.

Hyperthermia affects multiple intracellular processes, DNA repair pathways, as well as systemic immune responses. Furthermore, hyperthermia can target cancer cells in hypoxic and nutrient-deprived tumour areas where ionising radiation and chemotherapy are least effective. Hyperthermia can also modify factors that are essential for tumour survival and growth, such as the microenvironment, immune responses, vascularisation and oxygen supply. Thus, the effects of hyperthermia are multifactorial.

Hyperthermia is a clinically proven successful adjuvant treatment. As such in this Special Issue of Cancers we aim to increase awareness of the benefits of hyperthermia to a broader audience and to discuss all novel preclinical and clinical aspects of hyperthermia-based anticancer treatments and welcome contributions to this theme.

Dr. Nicolaas A.P. Franken
Dr. Arlene L. Oei
Dr. Johannes Crezee
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cancers is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Hydroxyethyl Starch-Based Nanoparticles Featured with Redox-Sensitivity and Chemo-Photothermal Therapy for Synergized Tumor Eradication
Cancers 2019, 11(2), 207; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers11020207
Received: 8 January 2019 / Revised: 25 January 2019 / Accepted: 2 February 2019 / Published: 11 February 2019
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Abstract
Chemo-photothermal combination therapy could achieve synergistically enhanced efficiency against tumors. Nanocarriers with good safety and high efficiency for chemo- photothermal therapy are pressingly needed. A new type of hydroxyethyl starch (HES) based on nanoparticles (NPs) loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) and indocyanine green (ICG) [...] Read more.
Chemo-photothermal combination therapy could achieve synergistically enhanced efficiency against tumors. Nanocarriers with good safety and high efficiency for chemo- photothermal therapy are pressingly needed. A new type of hydroxyethyl starch (HES) based on nanoparticles (NPs) loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) and indocyanine green (ICG) was, thus, developed in this study. DOX-loaded HES conjugates with redox-sensitivity (HES-SS-DOX) were first synthesized and they were then combined with ICG to self-assemble into [email protected] NPs with controlled compositions and sizes via collaborative interactions. The optimal [email protected] NPs had good physical and photothermal stability in aqueous media and showed high photothermal efficiency in vivo. They were able to fast release the loaded DOX in response to the redox stimulus and the applied laser irradiation. Based on the H22-tumor-bearing mouse model, these NPs were found to tendentiously accumulate inside tumors in comparison to other major organs. The [email protected] NPs together with dose-designated laser irradiation were able to fully eradicate tumors with only one injection and one single subsequent laser irradiation on the tumor site during a 14-day treatment period. In addition, they showed almost no impairment to the body. The presently developed [email protected] NPs have good in vivo safety and highly efficient anti-tumor capability. These NPs in conjugation with laser irradiation have promising potential for chemo-photothermal cancer therapy in the clinic. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hyperthermia-based Anticancer Treatments)
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Open AccessArticle On the Mechanism of Hyperthermia-Induced BRCA2 Protein Degradation
Received: 18 December 2018 / Revised: 9 January 2019 / Accepted: 10 January 2019 / Published: 15 January 2019
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Abstract
The DNA damage response (DDR) is a designation for a number of pathways that protects our DNA from various damaging agents. In normal cells, the DDR is extremely important for maintaining genome integrity, but in cancer cells these mechanisms counteract therapy-induced DNA damage. [...] Read more.
The DNA damage response (DDR) is a designation for a number of pathways that protects our DNA from various damaging agents. In normal cells, the DDR is extremely important for maintaining genome integrity, but in cancer cells these mechanisms counteract therapy-induced DNA damage. Inhibition of the DDR could therefore be used to increase the efficacy of anti-cancer treatments. Hyperthermia is an example of such a treatment—it inhibits a sub-pathway of the DDR, called homologous recombination (HR). It does so by inducing proteasomal degradation of BRCA2 —one of the key HR factors. Understanding the precise mechanism that mediates this degradation is important for our understanding of how hyperthermia affects therapy and how homologous recombination and BRCA2 itself function. In addition, mechanistic insight into the process of hyperthermia-induced BRCA2 degradation can yield new therapeutic strategies to enhance the effects of local hyperthermia or to inhibit HR. Here, we investigate the mechanisms driving hyperthermia-induced BRCA2 degradation. We find that BRCA2 degradation is evolutionarily conserved, that BRCA2 stability is dependent on HSP90, that ubiquitin might not be involved in directly targeting BRCA2 for protein degradation via the proteasome, and that BRCA2 degradation might be modulated by oxidative stress and radical scavengers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hyperthermia-based Anticancer Treatments)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Variation in Clinical Application of Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy: A Review
Received: 27 November 2018 / Revised: 2 January 2019 / Accepted: 7 January 2019 / Published: 11 January 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3128 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Peritoneal metastasis (PM) originating from gastrointestinal and gynecological malignancies are associated with a poor prognosis and rapid disease progression. Cytoreductive surgery (CRS) with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) is an effective treatment option with curative intent. Hyperthermia enhances the cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutic drugs, thereby [...] Read more.
Peritoneal metastasis (PM) originating from gastrointestinal and gynecological malignancies are associated with a poor prognosis and rapid disease progression. Cytoreductive surgery (CRS) with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) is an effective treatment option with curative intent. Hyperthermia enhances the cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutic drugs, thereby killing microscopic tumors and reducing the risk of tumor recurrence. Eight parameters potentially have an impact on the efficacy of HIPEC: the type of drug, drug concentrations, carrier solution, volume of the perfusate, temperature of the perfusate, duration of the treatment, the technique of delivery, and patient selection. In this review, a literature search was performed on PubMed, and a total of 564 articles were screened of which 168 articles were included. Although HIPEC is a successful treatment, there is no standardized method for delivering HIPEC: the choice of parameters is presently largely determined by institutional preferences. We discuss the current choice of the parameters and hypothesize about improvements toward uniform standardization. Quantifying the effect of each parameter separately is necessary to determine the optimal way to perform HIPEC procedures. In vivo, in vitro, in silico, and other experimental studies should shed light on the role of each of the eight parameters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hyperthermia-based Anticancer Treatments)
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