Special Issue "Sports Fluid Mechanics"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Mechanical Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Takeshi Asai
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Health and Sports Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba-City 305-8574, Japan
Interests: sports technique; sports equipment; sports fluid mechanics; sports coaching

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recently, research studies on fluid mechanics of sports have been limited to sporting equipment, such as balls, and sporting events, such as swimming and ski jumping. However, given the recent trend in which a difference as small as 1/100 of a second can have a significant impact on the results of a competition, topics such as aerodynamics and hydrodynamics in sports have become main research interests in the fields of sport sciences, sport engineering, and sport technology. In addition, basic research in fluid mechanics and fluid engineering is often useful in improving sport performance and in providing a scientific approach to sport coaching.

We are inviting the submission of manuscripts to this Special Issue on “Sports Fluid Mechanics”. This Special Issue aims to cover sports fluid mechanics studies, including sports aerodynamics, sports hydrodynamics, and relevant sports sciences and technology. These important issues include but are not limited to the topics described in the keywords.

Prof. Dr. Takeshi Asai
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Sports aerodynamics
  • Sports hydrodynamics
  • Experimental fluid dynamics (EFD) in sports
  • Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in sports
  • Flow visualisation in sports
  • Physics of flow in sports
  • Boundary layers in sports
  • Fluid-structure interaction in sports
  • Fluid transients in sports
  • Turbulence in sports
  • Education of fluid in sports

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Aerodynamics Analysis of Speed Skating Helmets: Investigation by CFD Simulations
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(7), 3148; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11073148 - 01 Apr 2021
Viewed by 235
Abstract
In this work, we investigate the flow field around speed skating helmets and their associated aerodynamic drag by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. An existing helmet frequently used in competition was taken as a baseline. Six additional helmet designs, as well [...] Read more.
In this work, we investigate the flow field around speed skating helmets and their associated aerodynamic drag by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. An existing helmet frequently used in competition was taken as a baseline. Six additional helmet designs, as well as the bare-head configuration, were analysed. All the numerical simulations were performed via 3D RANS simulations using the SST k-ω turbulence model. The results show that the use of a helmet always reduces the aerodynamic drag with respect to the bare head configuration. Besides, an optimised helmet design enables a reduction of the skaters aerodynamic drag by 5.9%, with respect to the bare-head configuration, and by 1.6% with respect to the use of the baseline Omega helmet. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sports Fluid Mechanics)
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Open AccessArticle
Aerodynamics of Cycling Skinsuits Focused on the Surface Shape of the Arms
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(5), 2200; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11052200 - 03 Mar 2021
Viewed by 253
Abstract
In cycling, air resistance corresponds to 90% of the resistance on the bicycle and cyclist and 70% of this is applied to the body of the cyclist. Despite research on postures that could reduce air resistance, few studies have been conducted on full-body [...] Read more.
In cycling, air resistance corresponds to 90% of the resistance on the bicycle and cyclist and 70% of this is applied to the body of the cyclist. Despite research on postures that could reduce air resistance, few studies have been conducted on full-body cycling suits. As the aerodynamics of the surface shape of clothing fabric are still unclear, the airflow around cyclists and air resistance were examined using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method and wind tunnel experiment. Specifically, in this study, we focused on how different surface shapes of cycling suit fabrics affect air resistance. CFD results indicate that air resistance during a race was high at the head, arms and legs of the cyclist. In the wind tunnel experiment, a cylinder model resembling the arms was used to compare the aerodynamic forces of various fabrics and the results showed that air resistance changed according to the fabric surface shape. Moreover, by changing the fabric shape of the arms of the cycling suits, reduction of air resistance by up to 8% is achievable. These results suggest that offering the most appropriate suit type to each cyclist, considering race conditions, can contribute to further improvement in their performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sports Fluid Mechanics)
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Open AccessArticle
The Impact of Skinsuit Zigzag Tape Turbulators on Speed Skating Performance
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(3), 988; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11030988 - 22 Jan 2021
Viewed by 299
Abstract
At the 1998 Nagano Winter Olympic Games, zigzag tape was introduced on the race suit lower legs and cap of speed skaters. Application of these zigzag devices on live skaters and cylinders in the wind tunnel showed large improvements in the aerodynamic drag. [...] Read more.
At the 1998 Nagano Winter Olympic Games, zigzag tape was introduced on the race suit lower legs and cap of speed skaters. Application of these zigzag devices on live skaters and cylinders in the wind tunnel showed large improvements in the aerodynamic drag. These wind-tunnel results were unfortunately not widely published, and the impact of the zigzag strips in a real skating environment was never established. This paper aims to show the background of the application of the zigzag tape and to establish the impact it may have had on speed-skating performance. From comparisons of 5000 m races just before, during and just after the Nagano Olympics and an analysis of historic world record data of the 1500 m men’s speed skating, the impact of the zigzag tape turbulators on average lap times on 1500 and 5000 m races is calculated to be about 0.5 s. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sports Fluid Mechanics)
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Soccer Ball Panels on Aerodynamic Characteristics and Flow in Drag Crisis
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(1), 296; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11010296 - 30 Dec 2020
Viewed by 365
Abstract
The panel patterns of soccer balls that change with each World Cup have a significant impact on the balls’ aerodynamic and flight characteristics. In this study, the aerodynamic forces of eleven types of soccer ball with different panel patterns were measured in a [...] Read more.
The panel patterns of soccer balls that change with each World Cup have a significant impact on the balls’ aerodynamic and flight characteristics. In this study, the aerodynamic forces of eleven types of soccer ball with different panel patterns were measured in a wind tunnel experiment. We characterized the panel shapes of soccer balls by the length, cross-sectional area, and the panel grooves’ volume. The results confirmed that the drag and drag crisis characteristics are dependent on the groove length and volumes. Flow separation points were visualized by an oil film experiment and particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement to understand the drag crisis of the soccer balls. The results showed that the panel shape of the ball significantly changes the position of the separation point near the critical region, where the drags crisis occurs. In the critical region, laminar and turbulent flows coexist on the ball. On the other hand, the effect of panel shape on the separation point position is small in subcritical and supercritical states. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sports Fluid Mechanics)
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Open AccessArticle
Investigation of Reverse Swing and Magnus Effect on a Cricket Ball Using Particle Image Velocimetry
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(22), 7990; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10227990 - 11 Nov 2020
Viewed by 503
Abstract
Lateral movement from the principal trajectory, or “swing”, can be generated on a cricket ball when its seam, which sits proud of the surface, is angled to the flow. The boundary layer on the two hemispheres divided by the seam is governed by [...] Read more.
Lateral movement from the principal trajectory, or “swing”, can be generated on a cricket ball when its seam, which sits proud of the surface, is angled to the flow. The boundary layer on the two hemispheres divided by the seam is governed by the Reynolds number and the surface roughness; the swing is fundamentally caused by the pressure differences associated with asymmetric flow separation. Skillful bowlers impart a small backspin to create gyroscopic inertia and stabilize the seam position in flight. Under certain flow conditions, the resultant pressure asymmetry can reverse across the hemispheres and “reverse swing” will occur. In this paper, particle image velocimetry measurements of a scaled cricket ball are presented to interrogate the flow field and the physical mechanism for reverse swing. The results show that a laminar separation bubble forms on the non-seam side (hemisphere), causing the separation angle for the boundary layer to be increased relative to that on the seam side. For the first time, it is shown that the separation bubble is present even under large rates of backspin, suggesting that this flow feature is present under match conditions. The Magnus effect on a rotating ball is also demonstrated, with the position of flow separation on the upper (retreating) side delayed due to the reduced relative speed between the surface and the freestream. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sports Fluid Mechanics)
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Surface Groove Structure on the Aerodynamics of Soccer Balls
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(17), 5877; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10175877 - 25 Aug 2020
Viewed by 563
Abstract
Soccer balls have undergone dramatic changes in their surface structure that can affect their aerodynamics. The properties of the soccer ball surface such as the panel shape, panel orientation, seam characteristics, and surface roughness have a significant impact on its aerodynamics and flight [...] Read more.
Soccer balls have undergone dramatic changes in their surface structure that can affect their aerodynamics. The properties of the soccer ball surface such as the panel shape, panel orientation, seam characteristics, and surface roughness have a significant impact on its aerodynamics and flight trajectory. In this study, we performed wind-tunnel tests to investigate how the introduction of grooves on the surface of a soccer ball affects the flight stability and aerodynamic forces on the ball. Our results show that for soccer balls without grooves, changing the panel orientation of the ball causes a significant change in the drag coefficient. Soccer balls with grooves exhibited a smaller change in air resistance (Cd) in the supercritical region (20 to 30 m/s; 3.0 × 105Re ≤ 4.7 × 105), compared to the ungrooved ball where only the panel orientation was changed. Furthermore, at power-shot speeds (25 m/s), the grooved ball exhibited smaller variations in lift force and side force than the ungrooved ball. These results suggest that a long groove structure on the surface of the soccer ball has a significant impact on the air flow around the ball in the supercritical region, and has the effect of keeping the air flow separation line constant. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sports Fluid Mechanics)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Flow Visualization of Spinning and Nonspinning Soccer Balls Using Computational Fluid Dynamics
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(13), 4543; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10134543 - 30 Jun 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 849
Abstract
Various studies have been conducted on the aerodynamic characteristics of nonspinning and spinning soccer balls. However, the vortex structures in the wake of the balls are almost unknown. One of the main computational fluid dynamics methods used for the analysis of vortex structures [...] Read more.
Various studies have been conducted on the aerodynamic characteristics of nonspinning and spinning soccer balls. However, the vortex structures in the wake of the balls are almost unknown. One of the main computational fluid dynamics methods used for the analysis of vortex structures is the lattice Boltzmann method as it facilitates high-precision analysis. Studies to elucidate the dominant vortex structure are important because curled shots and passes involving spinning balls are frequently used in actual soccer games. In this study, we identify the large-scale dominant vortex structure of a soccer ball and investigate the stability of the structure using the lattice Boltzmann method, wind tunnel tests, and free-flight experiments. One of the dominant vortex structures in the wake of both nonspinning and spinning balls is a large-scale counter-rotating vortex pair. The side force acting on a spinning ball stabilizes when the fluctuation of the separation points of the ball is suppressed by the rotation of the ball. Thus, although a spinning soccer ball is deflected by the Magnus effect, its trajectory is regular and stable, suggesting that a spinning ball can be aimed accurately at the outset of its course. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sports Fluid Mechanics)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

1. Richard Jackson, Edmund Harberd, Gary Lock and James Scobie 

Title: Investigation of Reverse Swing and Magnus Effect on A Cricket Ball Using Particle Image Velocimetry

Submission Date: October 2020

2. Firoz Alam

Title: Aero-Hydrodynamics of Textiles in Speed Sports

 
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