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Tomography, Volume 10, Issue 7 (July 2024) – 13 articles

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10 pages, 716 KiB  
Article
Hyperpolarized Water for Coronary Artery Angiography and Whole-Heart Myocardial Perfusion Quantification
by Yupeng Zhao, Mathilde Hauge Lerche, Magnus Karlsson, Rie Beck Olin, Esben Søvsø Szocska Hansen, Malene Aastrup, Mohsen Redda, Christoffer Laustsen, Lars G. Hanson and Jan Henrik Ardenkjær-Larsen
Tomography 2024, 10(7), 1113-1122; https://doi.org/10.3390/tomography10070084 (registering DOI) - 13 Jul 2024
Viewed by 104
Abstract
Purpose: Water freely diffuses across cell membranes, making it suitable for measuring absolute tissue perfusion. In this study, we introduce an imaging method for conducting coronary artery angiography and quantifying myocardial perfusion across the entire heart using hyperpolarized water. Methods: 1H [...] Read more.
Purpose: Water freely diffuses across cell membranes, making it suitable for measuring absolute tissue perfusion. In this study, we introduce an imaging method for conducting coronary artery angiography and quantifying myocardial perfusion across the entire heart using hyperpolarized water. Methods: 1H was hyperpolarized using dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (dDNP) with UV-generated radicals. Submillimeter resolution coronary artery images were acquired as 2D projections using a spoiled GRE (SPGRE) sequence gated on diastole. Dynamic perfusion images were obtained with a multi-slice SPGRE with diastole gating, covering the entire heart. Perfusion values were analyzed through histograms, and the most frequent estimated perfusion value (the mode of the distribution), was compared with the average values for 15O water PET from the literature. Results: A liquid state polarization of 10% at the time of the injection and a 30 s T1 in D2O TRIS buffer were measured. Both coronary artery and dynamic perfusion images exhibited good quality. The main and small coronary artery branches were well resolved. The most frequent estimated perfusion value is around 0.6 mL/g/min, which is lower than the average values obtained from the literature for 15O-water PET (around 1.1 and 1.5 mL/g/min). Conclusion: The study successfully demonstrated the feasibility of achieving high-resolution, motion-free coronary artery angiography and 3D whole-heart quantitative myocardial perfusion using hyperpolarized water. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Cardiovascular Imaging)
14 pages, 3032 KiB  
Article
Collagen 1 Fiber Volume Predicts for Recurrence of Stage 1 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer
by Samata Kakkad, Balaji Krishnamachary, Nadege Fackche, Matthew Garner, Malcom Brock, Peng Huang and Zaver M. Bhujwalla
Tomography 2024, 10(7), 1099-1112; https://doi.org/10.3390/tomography10070083 (registering DOI) - 13 Jul 2024
Viewed by 117
Abstract
Background: The standard of care for stage 1 NSCLC is upfront surgery followed by surveillance. However, 20–30% of stage 1 NSCLC recur. There is an unmet need to identify individuals likely to recur who would benefit from frequent monitoring and aggressive cancer [...] Read more.
Background: The standard of care for stage 1 NSCLC is upfront surgery followed by surveillance. However, 20–30% of stage 1 NSCLC recur. There is an unmet need to identify individuals likely to recur who would benefit from frequent monitoring and aggressive cancer treatments. Collagen 1 (Col1) fibers detected by second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy are a major structural component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) of tumors that play a role in cancer progression. Method: We characterized Col1 fibers with SHG microscopy imaging of surgically resected stage 1 NSCLC. Gene expression from RNA sequencing data was used to validate the SHG microscopy findings. Results: We identified a significant (p ≤ 0.05) increase in the Col1 fiber volume in stage 1 NSCLC that recurred. The increase in Col1 fiber volume was supported by significant increases in the gene expression of Col1 in invasive, compared to noninvasive, lung adenocarcinoma. Significant differences were identified in the gene expression of other ECM proteins, as well as CAFs, immune checkpoint markers, immune cytokines, and T-cell markers. Conclusion: Col1 fiber analysis can provide a companion diagnostic test to evaluate the likelihood of tumor recurrence following stage 1 NSCLC. The studies expand our understanding of the role of the ECM in NSCLC recurrence. Full article
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10 pages, 1914 KiB  
Article
Connectivity Reveals the Relationships between Human Brain Areas Associated with High-Level Linguistic Processing and Macaque Brain Areas
by Fangyuan Wang, Xiaohua Lu, Xiaofeng Chen, Qianshan Wang, Qi Li and Haifang Li
Tomography 2024, 10(7), 1089-1098; https://doi.org/10.3390/tomography10070082 (registering DOI) - 12 Jul 2024
Viewed by 106
Abstract
Cross-species research has advanced human understanding of brain regions, with cross-species comparisons using magnetic resonance imaging technology becoming increasingly common. Currently, cross-species research on human language regions has primarily focused on traditional brain areas such as the Broca region. While some studies have [...] Read more.
Cross-species research has advanced human understanding of brain regions, with cross-species comparisons using magnetic resonance imaging technology becoming increasingly common. Currently, cross-species research on human language regions has primarily focused on traditional brain areas such as the Broca region. While some studies have indicated that human language function also involves other language regions, the corresponding relationships between these brain regions in humans and macaques remain unclear. This study calculated the strength of the connections between the high-level language processing regions in human and macaque brains, identified homologous target areas based on the structural connections of white-matter fiber bundles, and compared the connectivity profiles of both species. The results of the experiment demonstrated that macaques possess brain regions which exhibit connectivity patterns resembling those found in human high-level language processing regions. This discovery suggests that while the function of a human brain region is specialized, it still maintains a structural connectivity similar to that seen in macaques. Full article
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15 pages, 8661 KiB  
Article
An Improved Postprocessing Method to Mitigate the Macroscopic Cross-Slice B0 Field Effect on R2* Measurements in the Mouse Brain at 7T
by Chu-Yu Lee, Daniel R. Thedens, Olivia Lullmann, Emily J. Steinbach, Michelle R. Tamplin, Michael S. Petronek, Isabella M. Grumbach, Bryan G. Allen, Lyndsay A. Harshman and Vincent A. Magnotta
Tomography 2024, 10(7), 1074-1088; https://doi.org/10.3390/tomography10070081 (registering DOI) - 11 Jul 2024
Viewed by 147
Abstract
The MR transverse relaxation rate, R2*, has been widely used to detect iron and myelin content in tissue. However, it is also sensitive to macroscopic B0 inhomogeneities. One approach to correct for the B0 effect is to fit [...] Read more.
The MR transverse relaxation rate, R2*, has been widely used to detect iron and myelin content in tissue. However, it is also sensitive to macroscopic B0 inhomogeneities. One approach to correct for the B0 effect is to fit gradient-echo signals with the three-parameter model, a sinc function-weighted monoexponential decay. However, such three-parameter models are subject to increased noise sensitivity. To address this issue, this study presents a two-stage fitting procedure based on the three-parameter model to mitigate the B0 effect and reduce the noise sensitivity of R2* measurement in the mouse brain at 7T. MRI scans were performed on eight healthy mice. The gradient-echo signals were fitted with the two-stage fitting procedure to generate R2corr_t*. The signals were also fitted with the monoexponential and three-parameter models to generate R2nocorr* and R2corr*, respectively. Regions of interest (ROIs), including the corpus callosum, internal capsule, somatosensory cortex, caudo-putamen, thalamus, and lateral ventricle, were selected to evaluate the within-ROI mean and standard deviation (SD) of the R2* measurements. The results showed that the Akaike information criterion of the monoexponential model was significantly reduced by using the three-parameter model in the selected ROIs (p = 0.0039–0.0078). However, the within-ROI SD of R2corr* using the three-parameter model was significantly higher than that of the R2nocorr* in the internal capsule, caudo-putamen, and thalamus regions (p = 0.0039), a consequence partially due to the increased noise sensitivity of the three-parameter model. With the two-stage fitting procedure, the within-ROI SD of R2corr* was significantly reduced by 7.7–30.2% in all ROIs, except for the somatosensory cortex region with a fast in-plane variation of the B0 gradient field (p = 0.0039–0.0078). These results support the utilization of the two-stage fitting procedure to mitigate the B0 effect and reduce noise sensitivity for R2* measurement in the mouse brain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Neuroimaging)
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10 pages, 251 KiB  
Article
Emergency CT Scans: Unveiling the Risks of Contrast-Associated Acute Kidney Injury
by Omay Sorgun, Rezan Karaali, Cüneyt Arıkan, Efe Kanter and Güner Yurtsever
Tomography 2024, 10(7), 1064-1073; https://doi.org/10.3390/tomography10070080 (registering DOI) - 11 Jul 2024
Viewed by 133
Abstract
Objectives: This study aimed to identify the incidence and risk factors for contrast-associated acute kidney injury nephropathy (CA-AKI) in patients undergoing contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CCT) in the emergency department. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective single-center study, patients aged 18 and older who [...] Read more.
Objectives: This study aimed to identify the incidence and risk factors for contrast-associated acute kidney injury nephropathy (CA-AKI) in patients undergoing contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CCT) in the emergency department. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective single-center study, patients aged 18 and older who visited the emergency department and underwent CCT between January and February 2022 were included. The Mehran score, calculated from patient data, was used to assess risk. CA-AKI development was determined by measuring serum creatinine (SCr) levels 48–72 h post-contrast administration. Results: The study included 532 patients, with a mean age of 57 ± 19 years; 53.2% were male. CA-AKI developed in 16% of cases, 5.82% required hemodialysis, and 7.9% died. The Mehran score was the only significant predictor of CA-AKI development. Patients with a Mehran score of 16 or higher had a 161-fold increased risk of developing CA-AKI compared to those with a score of 5 or lower. The model achieved a 91.3% correct classification rate. Logistic regression analysis showed that CA-AKI significantly increased mortality risk by 15.7 times. Conclusion: The Mehran score, originally developed for predicting CA-AKI risk post-coronary intervention, is also effective for predicting CA-AKI risk after CCT. While CA-AKI is a significant factor affecting mortality, it is not the sole cause of death (Nagelkerke R2 value 0.310). Full article
10 pages, 1720 KiB  
Article
Assessment of Psoas Muscle Index in Middle-Aged Type 2 Diabetes Patients: Impact of Insulin Therapy on Sarcopenia
by Ismail Taskent, Bunyamin Ece and Sonay Aydin
Tomography 2024, 10(7), 1054-1063; https://doi.org/10.3390/tomography10070079 (registering DOI) - 10 Jul 2024
Viewed by 141
Abstract
Objective: Sarcopenia, characterized by progressive skeletal muscle loss, poses significant health risks, including physical impairment and mortality. The relationship between sarcopenia and insulin resistance suggests insulin therapy’s potential in preserving muscle mass, particularly in Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. This study aims [...] Read more.
Objective: Sarcopenia, characterized by progressive skeletal muscle loss, poses significant health risks, including physical impairment and mortality. The relationship between sarcopenia and insulin resistance suggests insulin therapy’s potential in preserving muscle mass, particularly in Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. This study aims to evaluate the Psoas Muscle Index (PMI) via computed tomography (CT) in middle-aged T2DM patients on insulin therapy versus oral antidiabetic drugs (OAD) and controls. Methods: This retrospective study included 107 middle-aged T2DM patients undergoing non-contrast CT scans and 58 age-matched controls. CT images were analyzed to calculate PMI. Statistical analysis included Chi-square tests, independent samples t-tests, Mann–Whitney U tests, and correlation analyses. Results: Insulin-treated patients exhibited higher PMI than OAD users (p < 0.001), while OAD users had lower PMI than controls (p < 0.001). No significant difference was found between insulin-treated patients and controls (p = 0.616). Negative correlations were observed between T2DM duration/age and PMI across all groups, with a positive correlation between T2DM duration and BMI observed in the OAD group. Conclusions: Insulin therapy in T2DM patients, regardless of age or disease duration, positively impacts muscle mass, highlighting its potential in preserving muscular health and advocating for tailored treatment strategies in T2DM management. Full article
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12 pages, 9083 KiB  
Article
Prediction of the Benign or Malignant Nature of Pulmonary Pure Ground-Glass Nodules Based on Radiomics Analysis of High-Resolution Computed Tomography Images
by Xiaoxia Ping, Nan Jiang, Qian Meng and Chunhong Hu
Tomography 2024, 10(7), 1042-1053; https://doi.org/10.3390/tomography10070078 - 5 Jul 2024
Viewed by 179
Abstract
To evaluate the efficacy of radiomics features extracted from preoperative high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scans in distinguishing benign and malignant pulmonary pure ground-glass nodules (pGGNs), a retrospective study of 395 patients from 2016 to 2020 was conducted. All nodules were randomly divided into [...] Read more.
To evaluate the efficacy of radiomics features extracted from preoperative high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scans in distinguishing benign and malignant pulmonary pure ground-glass nodules (pGGNs), a retrospective study of 395 patients from 2016 to 2020 was conducted. All nodules were randomly divided into the training and validation sets in the ratio of 7:3. Radiomics features were extracted using MaZda software (version 4.6), and the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) was employed for feature selection. Significant differences were observed in the training set between benign and malignant pGGNs in sex, mean CT value, margin, pleural retraction, tumor–lung interface, and internal vascular change, and then the mean CT value and the morphological features model were constructed. Fourteen radiomics features were selected by LASSO for the radiomics model. The combined model was developed by integrating all selected radiographic and radiomics features using logistic regression. The AUCs in the training set were 0.606 for the mean CT value, 0.718 for morphological features, 0.756 for radiomics features, and 0.808 for the combined model. In the validation set, AUCs were 0.601, 0.692, 0.696, and 0.738, respectively. The decision curves showed that the combined model demonstrated the highest net benefit. Full article
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11 pages, 1046 KiB  
Article
Comparison of the Size Measurement of Gallbladder Polyps by Three Different Radiologists in Abdominal Ultrasonography
by Kyu-Chong Lee, Jin-Kyem Kim and Dong-Kyu Kim
Tomography 2024, 10(7), 1031-1041; https://doi.org/10.3390/tomography10070077 - 3 Jul 2024
Viewed by 375
Abstract
Background: There is little information regarding the size measurement differences in gallbladder (GB) polyps performed by different radiologists on abdominal ultrasonography (US). Aim: To reveal the differences in GB polyp size measurements performed by different radiologists on abdominal US. Methods: From June to [...] Read more.
Background: There is little information regarding the size measurement differences in gallbladder (GB) polyps performed by different radiologists on abdominal ultrasonography (US). Aim: To reveal the differences in GB polyp size measurements performed by different radiologists on abdominal US. Methods: From June to September 2022, the maximum diameter of 228 GB polyps was measured twice on abdominal US by one of three radiologists (a third-year radiology resident [reader A], a radiologist with 7 years of experience in abdominal US [reader B], and an abdominal radiologist with 8 years of experience in abdominal US [reader C]). Intra-reader agreements for polyp size measurements were assessed by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). A Bland–Altman plot was used to visualize the differences between the first and second size measurements in each reader. Results: Reader A, reader B, and reader C evaluated 65, 77, and 86 polyps, respectively. The mean size of measured 228 GB polyps was 5.0 ± 1.9 mm. Except for the case where reader A showed moderate intra-reader agreement (0.726) for polyps with size ≤ 5 mm, all readers showed an overall high intra-reader reliability (reader A, ICC = 0.859; reader B, ICC = 0.947, reader C, ICC = 0.948), indicative of good and excellent intra-reader agreements. The 95% limit of agreement of reader A, B, and C was 1.9 mm of the mean in all three readers. Conclusions: GB polyp size measurement on abdominal US showed good or excellent intra-reader agreements. However, size changes of approximately less than 1.9 mm should be interpreted carefully because these may be within the measurement error. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Abdominal Imaging)
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7 pages, 6483 KiB  
Case Report
Pericardial Calcification: An Uncommon Case with Intraventricular Extension
by Miguel Santaularia-Tomas, Ely Sanchez-Felix, Kassandra Santos-Zaldivar, Allison Grosjean-Alvarez and Nina Mendez-Dominguez
Tomography 2024, 10(7), 1024-1030; https://doi.org/10.3390/tomography10070076 (registering DOI) - 29 Jun 2024
Viewed by 345
Abstract
An 80-year-old man presented to the cardiology outpatient clinic due to shortness of breath. His past medical history included alcohol intake, hypertension, inferior wall myocardial infarction (five years ago), an ischemic stroke, and permanent atrial fibrillation (diagnosed three years before the current examination). [...] Read more.
An 80-year-old man presented to the cardiology outpatient clinic due to shortness of breath. His past medical history included alcohol intake, hypertension, inferior wall myocardial infarction (five years ago), an ischemic stroke, and permanent atrial fibrillation (diagnosed three years before the current examination). A physical exam revealed a decreased intensity of S1 and S2, irregular rate and rhythm, and no murmurs nor friction rub. X-rays, Computed Tomography, and echocardiography exhibited pericardial calcification, involving mostly the inferior wall and protruding into the left ventricle. A diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis due to pericardial calcification was established and considered idiopathic. Even when it may be related to ischemic heart disease, post-infarction pericarditis could explain how the calcification extended to adjacent territory perfused by the circumflex coronary artery. Combined imaging studies were crucial not only for identifying calcium deposits in the pericardium but also in assessing a patient inherently prone to co-existing and exacerbating conditions. Even though pericardiectomy allows for removal of the clinical manifestations of congestive pericarditis in the most symptomatic patients with pericardial calcification, among patients like ours, with tolerable symptoms, cardiologists should discuss the therapeutic options considering the patient’s choices, potentially including a rehabilitation plan as part of non-pharmacological management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Cardiovascular Imaging)
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10 pages, 2018 KiB  
Article
Fat Fraction Extracted from Whole-Body Magnetic Resonance (WB-MR) in Bone Metastatic Prostate Cancer: Intra- and Inter-Reader Agreement of Single-Slice and Volumetric Measurements
by Giorgio Maria Agazzi, Nunzia Di Meo, Paolo Rondi, Chiara Saeli, Alberto Dalla Volta, Marika Vezzoli, Alfredo Berruti, Andrea Borghesi, Roberto Maroldi, Marco Ravanelli and Davide Farina
Tomography 2024, 10(7), 1014-1023; https://doi.org/10.3390/tomography10070075 - 28 Jun 2024
Viewed by 352
Abstract
Background: This study evaluates the repeatability and reproducibility of fat-fraction percentage (FF%) in whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) of prostate cancer patients with bone metastatic hormone naive disease. Methods: Patients were selected from the database of a prospective phase-II trial. The treatment response [...] Read more.
Background: This study evaluates the repeatability and reproducibility of fat-fraction percentage (FF%) in whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) of prostate cancer patients with bone metastatic hormone naive disease. Methods: Patients were selected from the database of a prospective phase-II trial. The treatment response was assessed using the METastasis Reporting and Data System for Prostate (MET-RADS-P). Two operators identified a Small Active Lesion (SAL, <10 mm) and a Large Active Lesion (LAL, ≥10 mm) per patient, performing manual segmentation of lesion volume and the largest cross-sectional area. Measurements were repeated by one operator after two weeks. Intra- and inter-reader agreements were assessed via Interclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) on first-order radiomics features. Results: Intra-reader ICC showed high repeatability for both SAL and LAL in a single slice (SS) and volumetric (VS) measurements with values ranging from 0.897 to 0.971. Inter-reader ICC ranged from 0.641 to 0.883, indicating moderate to good reproducibility. Spearman’s rho analysis confirmed a strong correlation between SS and VS measurements for SAL (0.817) and a moderate correlation for LAL (0.649). Both intra- and inter-rater agreement exceeded 0.75 for multiple first-order features across lesion sizes. Conclusion: This study suggests that FF% measurements are reproducible, particularly for larger lesions in both SS and VS assessments. Full article
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31 pages, 14782 KiB  
Review
Ultra-High Contrast MRI: The Whiteout Sign Shown with Divided Subtracted Inversion Recovery (dSIR) Sequences in Post-Insult Leukoencephalopathy Syndromes (PILS)
by Paul Condron, Daniel M. Cornfeld, Miriam Scadeng, Tracy R. Melzer, Gil Newburn, Mark Bydder, Eryn E. Kwon, Joshua P. McGeown, Geoffrey G. Handsfield, Taylor Emsden, Maryam Tayebi, Samantha J. Holdsworth and Graeme M. Bydder
Tomography 2024, 10(7), 983-1013; https://doi.org/10.3390/tomography10070074 - 26 Jun 2024
Viewed by 622
Abstract
Ultra-high contrast (UHC) MRI describes forms of MRI in which little or no contrast is seen on conventional MRI images but very high contrast is seen with UHC techniques. One of these techniques uses the divided subtracted inversion recovery (dSIR) sequence, which, in [...] Read more.
Ultra-high contrast (UHC) MRI describes forms of MRI in which little or no contrast is seen on conventional MRI images but very high contrast is seen with UHC techniques. One of these techniques uses the divided subtracted inversion recovery (dSIR) sequence, which, in modelling studies, can produce ten times the contrast of conventional inversion recovery (IR) sequences. When used in cases of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), the dSIR sequence frequently shows extensive abnormalities in white matter that appears normal when imaged with conventional T2-fluid-attenuated IR (T2-FLAIR) sequences. The changes are bilateral and symmetrical in white matter of the cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres. They partially spare the anterior and posterior central corpus callosum and peripheral white matter of the cerebral hemispheres and are described as the whiteout sign. In addition to mTBI, the whiteout sign has also been seen in methamphetamine use disorder and Grinker’s myelinopathy (delayed post-hypoxic leukoencephalopathy) in the absence of abnormalities on T2-FLAIR images, and is a central component of post-insult leukoencephalopathy syndromes. This paper describes the concept of ultra-high contrast MRI, the whiteout sign, the theory underlying the use of dSIR sequences and post-insult leukoencephalopathy syndromes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Section Neuroimaging)
13 pages, 1349 KiB  
Article
Application of Diffusion Kurtosis Imaging and Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Kidney Injury Associated with ANCA-Associated Vasculitis
by Wenhui Yu, Weijie Yan, Jing Yi, Lu Cheng, Peiyi Luo, Jiayu Sun, Shenju Gou and Ping Fu
Tomography 2024, 10(7), 970-982; https://doi.org/10.3390/tomography10070073 - 25 Jun 2024
Viewed by 561
Abstract
Objective: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been applied to assess the microstructure of the kidney. However, it is not clear whether fMRI could be used in the field of kidney injury in patients with Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV). Methods: This [...] Read more.
Objective: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been applied to assess the microstructure of the kidney. However, it is not clear whether fMRI could be used in the field of kidney injury in patients with Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV). Methods: This study included 20 patients with AAV. Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) scanning of the kidneys were performed in AAV patients and healthy controls. The mean kurtosis (MK), mean diffusivity (MD), and fractional anisotropy (FA) parameters of DKI, the R2* parameter of BOLD, and clinical data were further analyzed. Results: In AAV patients, the cortex exhibited lower MD but higher R2* values compared to the healthy controls. Medullary MK values were elevated in AAV patients. Renal medullary MK values showed a positive correlation with serum creatinine levels and negative correlations with hemoglobin levels and estimated glomerular filtration rate. To assess renal injury in AAV patients, AUC values for MK, MD, FA, and R2* in the cortex were 0.66, 0.67, 0.57, and 0.55, respectively, and those in the medulla were 0.81, 0.77, 0.61, and 0.53, respectively. Conclusions: Significant differences in DKI and BOLD MRI parameters were observed between AAV patients with kidney injuries and the healthy controls. The medullary MK value in DKI may be a noninvasive marker for assessing the severity of kidney injury in AAV patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI))
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21 pages, 11781 KiB  
Review
Quantitative and Compositional MRI of the Articular Cartilage: A Narrative Review
by Domenico Albano, Umberto Viglino, Francesco Esposito, Aldo Rizzo, Carmelo Messina, Salvatore Gitto, Stefano Fusco, Francesca Serpi, Benedikt Kamp, Anja Müller-Lutz, Riccardo D’Ambrosi, Luca Maria Sconfienza and Philipp Sewerin
Tomography 2024, 10(7), 949-969; https://doi.org/10.3390/tomography10070072 - 24 Jun 2024
Viewed by 671
Abstract
This review examines the latest advancements in compositional and quantitative cartilage MRI techniques, addressing both their potential and challenges. The integration of these advancements promises to improve disease detection, treatment monitoring, and overall patient care. We want to highlight the pivotal task of [...] Read more.
This review examines the latest advancements in compositional and quantitative cartilage MRI techniques, addressing both their potential and challenges. The integration of these advancements promises to improve disease detection, treatment monitoring, and overall patient care. We want to highlight the pivotal task of translating these techniques into widespread clinical use, the transition of cartilage MRI from technical validation to clinical application, emphasizing its critical role in identifying early signs of degenerative and inflammatory joint diseases. Recognizing these changes early may enable informed treatment decisions, thereby facilitating personalized medicine approaches. The evolving landscape of cartilage MRI underscores its increasing importance in clinical practice, offering valuable insights for patient management and therapeutic interventions. This review aims to discuss the old evidence and new insights about the evaluation of articular cartilage through MRI, with an update on the most recent literature published on novel quantitative sequences. Full article
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