Special Issue "Research on Immune Response and Vaccines"

A special issue of Vaccines (ISSN 2076-393X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2022 | Viewed by 328

Special Issue Editor

Dr. James Galloway
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Rheumatology, King's College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS, UK
2. Department of Rheumatology, King's College School of Medicine, King's College London, Weston Education Centre, 10 Cutcombe Road, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RJ, UK
Interests: Rheumatoid Arthritis; inflammatory arthritis and biologic therapy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The importance of vaccination has gained much attention, due to the advent of COVID-19 pandemic. However, despite decades of research, many diseases, including bacterial, fungal, parasitic and viral, are not having efficacious vaccines. The ultimate goal of vaccination is to generate a safe and effective long-term immune response against targeted disease.

Most vaccines work by mimicking infections. Vaccines activate the immune system and generate memory T and B lymphocytes that "remember" the disease-causing agents. Upon encountering these pathogens later, the immune system will mount a rapid and robust immune response to antigens it has previously experienced, thereby preventing disease or reducing its severity. The initial response to a vaccine is similar to the primary response upon first exposure to a pathogen, that is, slow and limited.

In this Special Issue, we will collect articles research related to vaccine efficacy and effectiveness, vaccine failure, herd immunity, herd effect, epidemiological transfer. Specifically, vaccine-related immune responses. We invite research employing quantitative and qualitative methods as well as contributions featuring under-researched populations.

Dr. James Galloway
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Vaccines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Communication
Variant Allele of ALDH2, rs671, Associates with Attenuated Post-Vaccination Response in Anti-SARS-CoV-2 Spike Protein IgG: A Prospective Study in the Japanese General Population
Vaccines 2022, 10(7), 1035; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10071035 - 28 Jun 2022
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Abstract
Uncovering the predictors of vaccine immunogenicity is essential for infection control. We have reported that the most prevalent polymorphism of the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 gene (ALDH2), rs671, may be associated with an attenuated immune system. To test the inverse relationship between [...] Read more.
Uncovering the predictors of vaccine immunogenicity is essential for infection control. We have reported that the most prevalent polymorphism of the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 gene (ALDH2), rs671, may be associated with an attenuated immune system. To test the inverse relationship between rs671 and antibody production after COVID-19 vaccination, the levels of anti-SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein S1 subunit (S1) IgG were repeatedly measured for four months before and after vaccination with BNT162b2 or mRNA-1273, in 88 Japanese workers and students (including 45 females, aged 21–56 years, with an rs671 variant allele frequency of 0.3). The mixed model including fixed effects of the vaccine type, weeks post vaccination (categorical variable), sex, age, height, smoking status, ethanol intake, exercise habit, perceived stress, steroid use, allergic diseases, and dyslipidemia, indicated an inverse association between log-transformed anti-S1 IgG levels and the number of rs671 variant alleles (partial regression coefficient = −0.15, p = 0.002). Our study indicated for the first time that the variant allele of ALDH2, rs671, is associated with the attenuated immunogenicity of COVID-19 mRNA vaccines. Our finding may provide a basis for personalized disease prevention based on a genetic polymorphism that is prevalent among East Asians. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research on Immune Response and Vaccines)
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