Novel Vaccine Stabilization and Delivery Technologies: Edition II

A special issue of Vaccines (ISSN 2076-393X). This special issue belongs to the section "Attenuated/Inactivated/Live and Vectored Vaccines".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 6766

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Mercer University, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA
Interests: bio-fabrication of microparticulate vaccines for infectious diseases and cancer
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
College of Pharmacy, Mercer University, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA
Interests: vaccine delivery; microneedle based vaccine delivery; vaccine delivery using oral dissolving films
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Center for Molecular Biotechnology, Newark, NJ, USA
Interests: vaccine delivery; microneedle-based vaccine delivery; vaccine delivery using oral dissolving films
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Pharmaceutical, Social and Administrative Sciences, McWhorter School of Pharmacy, Samford University, Birmingham, AL 35229, USA
Interests: vaccine delivery; microneedle based vaccine delivery; vaccine delivery using oral dissolving films
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In dealing with the aftermath of the coronavirus pandemic, vaccines have become a topic of discussion in every household. The overall development of robust vaccines with long-lasting efficacy has gained academic, industrial, and federal interest. Vaccines are the most effective method to prevent infectious diseases, with public immunization campaigns dramatically reducing the incidence of many life-threatening diseases and preventing an estimated 2–3 million deaths a year. Contemporary research has shown that vaccines that equip patients’ immune systems to recognize and target antigens are a promising frontier for infectious, as well as non-infectious diseases. Modern-day vaccine development is a complex process starting with antigen identification, development, and expression, followed by formulation and stabilization through the manufacturing process. With the advent of the RNA-based vaccine, candidates packaged into lipid-based nanoparticles (LNPs) have opened new doors in vaccine technology.

To formulate effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines, it is becoming apparent that both the innate and adaptive immune systems must be stimulated to protect from the current and future recognition of the target antigen. Further, vaccine formulation in a delivery system that has high patient acceptability, which stabilizes the vaccine and promotes cost-effective delivery, is essential for long-term use. Vaccine stability can be improved by optimizing the composition of formulations by the addition of excipients, thus, restricting molecular mobility and preventing degradation. This Special Issue focuses on the different platforms that are available for developing robust immunotherapies for use as vaccine candidates, along with vaccine stabilizations such as lyophilization, spray drying, nanoparticles, lipid vesicles, etc., and their subsequent delivery via various routes of administration. 

We encourage your submission and note that there is a short turnaround time for publication.

Prof. Dr. Martin J. D'Souza
Dr. Mohammad N. Uddin
Dr. Rikhav Gala
Dr. Bernadette D’Souza
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Vaccines is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • novel vaccines
  • Lipid-Nanoparticles (LNPs)
  • mRNA
  • COVID-19
  • drug-delivery devices
  • adaptive immune response

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 2196 KiB  
Article
Polymeric Delivery Systems as a Potential Vaccine against Visceral Leishmaniasis: Formulation Development and Immunogenicity
by João Guilherme Lino da Silva, Ana Alice Maia Gonçalves, Liliam Teixeira Oliveira, Giani Martins Garcia, Maurício Azevedo Batista, Ludmila Zanandreis de Mendonça, Kelvinson Fernandes Viana, Rita de Cássia Oliveira Sant’Ana, Otoni Alves de Oliveira Melo Júnior, Denise Silveira-Lemos, Walderez Ornelas Dutra, Olindo Assis Martins-Filho, Alexsandro Sobreira Galdino, Sandra Aparecida Lima de Moura, Vanessa Carla Furtado Mosqueira and Rodolfo Cordeiro Giunchetti
Vaccines 2023, 11(8), 1309; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines11081309 - 31 Jul 2023
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Abstract
Recent studies suggest that the association of antigens in microparticles increases the anti-Leishmania vaccine immunogenicity. This study aims to investigate the in situ effect of the adjuvant performance consisting of chitosan-coated poly(D,L-lactic) acid submicrometric particles (SMP) and analyze [...] Read more.
Recent studies suggest that the association of antigens in microparticles increases the anti-Leishmania vaccine immunogenicity. This study aims to investigate the in situ effect of the adjuvant performance consisting of chitosan-coated poly(D,L-lactic) acid submicrometric particles (SMP) and analyze the inflammatory profile and toxicity. Two formulations were selected, SMP1, containing poly(D,L-lactide) (PLA) 1% wt/v and chitosan 1% wt/v; and SMP2, containing PLA 5% wt/v and chitosan 5% wt/v. After a single dose of the unloaded SMP1 or SMP2 in mice, the SMPs promoted cell recruitment without tissue damage. In addition, besides the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity having demonstrated similar results among the analyzed groups, a progressive reduction in the levels of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) until 72 h was observed for SMPs. While IL-6 levels were similar among all the analyzed groups along the kinetics, only the SMPs groups had detectable levels of TNF-α. Additionally, the Leishmania braziliensis antigen was encapsulated in SMPs (SMP1Ag and SMP2Ag), and mice were vaccinated with three doses. The immunogenicity analysis by flow cytometry demonstrated a reduction in NK (CD3CD49+) cells in all the SMPs groups, in addition to impairment in the T cells subsets (CD3+CD4+) and CD3+CD8+) and B cells (CD19+) of the SMP2 group. The resulting data demonstrate that the chitosan-coated SMP formulations stimulate the early events of an innate immune response, suggesting their ability to increase the immunogenicity of co-administered Leishmania antigens. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Vaccine Stabilization and Delivery Technologies: Edition II)
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12 pages, 2488 KiB  
Article
Intraduodenal Delivery of Exosome-Loaded SARS-CoV-2 RBD mRNA Induces a Neutralizing Antibody Response in Mice
by Quan Zhang, Miao Wang, Chunle Han, Zhijun Wen, Xiaozhu Meng, Dongli Qi, Na Wang, Huanqing Du, Jianhong Wang, Lu Lu and Xiaohu Ge
Vaccines 2023, 11(3), 673; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines11030673 - 16 Mar 2023
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3742
Abstract
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has presented numerous challenges to global health. Vaccines, including lipid—based nanoparticle mRNA, inactivated virus, and recombined protein, have been used to prevent SARS-CoV-2 infections in clinics and have been [...] Read more.
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has presented numerous challenges to global health. Vaccines, including lipid—based nanoparticle mRNA, inactivated virus, and recombined protein, have been used to prevent SARS-CoV-2 infections in clinics and have been immensely helpful in controlling the pandemic. Here, we present and assess an oral mRNA vaccine based on bovine-milk-derived exosomes (milk-exos), which encodes the SARS-CoV-2 receptor-binding domain (RBD) as an immunogen. The results indicate that RBD mRNA delivered by milk-derived exosomes can produce secreted RBD peptides in 293 cells in vitro and stimulates neutralizing antibodies against RBD in mice. These results indicate that SARS-CoV-2 RBD mRNA vaccine loading with bovine-milk-derived exosomes is an easy, cheap, and novel way to introduce immunity against SARS-CoV-2 in vivo. Additionally, it also can work as a new oral delivery system for mRNA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Vaccine Stabilization and Delivery Technologies: Edition II)
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15 pages, 6303 KiB  
Article
Boosting In-Vivo Anti-Tumor Immunity with an Oral Microparticulate Breast Cancer Vaccine and Low-Dose Cyclophosphamide
by Nihal Mulla, Lipika Chablani, Ashwin C. Parenky and Martin J. D’Souza
Vaccines 2023, 11(3), 543; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines11030543 - 24 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1469
Abstract
Tumor cells express antigens that should induce immune-mediated rejection; however, spontaneous rejection of established tumors is rare. Recent evidence suggests that patients suffering from cancer exhibit an elevation in regulatory T cells population, a subset of CD4+ T cells, which suppress tumor recognition [...] Read more.
Tumor cells express antigens that should induce immune-mediated rejection; however, spontaneous rejection of established tumors is rare. Recent evidence suggests that patients suffering from cancer exhibit an elevation in regulatory T cells population, a subset of CD4+ T cells, which suppress tumor recognition and elimination by cytotoxic T cells. This study investigates immunotherapeutic strategies to overcome the immunosuppressive effects exerted by regulatory T cells. A novel immunotherapeutic strategy was developed by simultaneous administration of oral microparticulate breast cancer vaccines and cyclophosphamide, a regulatory T cell inhibitor. Breast cancer vaccine microparticles were prepared by spray drying, and administered orally to female mice inoculated with 4TO7 murine breast cancer cells in combination with a low dose of intraperitoneally administered cyclophosphamide. Mice receiving the combination of vaccine microparticles and cyclophosphamide exhibited maximal tumor regression and the highest survival rate compared with the control groups. This study highlights the importance of cancer vaccination along with regulatory T cell depletion in cancer therapy, and suggests that a low dose of cyclophosphamide that specifically and significantly depletes regulatory T cells may be a highly effective immunotherapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Vaccine Stabilization and Delivery Technologies: Edition II)
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