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Special Issue "Biological Control and Post-Harvest Detoxification of Mycotoxins as Strategies to Reduce the Impact of Mycotoxins"

A special issue of Toxins (ISSN 2072-6651). This special issue belongs to the section "Mycotoxins".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Siska Croubels

Ghent University, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Biochemistry, Laboratory of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Merelbeke, Belgium
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Interests: Mycotoxins: toxicokinetics; toxicity; binders; modifiers; in vitro; in vivo; food production animals; porcine biomedical model for humans; bioanalysis; biomarkers; cytochrome P450; ABC transporters; impact on infectious diseases.
Veterinary drugs: pharmacokinetics; pharmacodynamics; PK/PD modeling; residues; food safety; bioanalysis
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Kris Audenaert

Ghent University, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Department of Applied Biosciences, Ghent, Belgium
Website | E-Mail
Interests: plant–pathogen interactions; biocontrol; endophytic fungi; green leaf volatiles (GLVs); biogenic volatile compounds (BVOCs); plant defense priming; plant hormones; phenomics; genome-editing in fungi; plant defense pathways; biodegradation of mycotoxins; mycotoxin prediction and modelling; bioassays to assess toxicity of trichothecenes and their derivatives

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Mycotoxins are inherent to many food and feed products worldwide. Hallmarks of their presence and their impact on animal and human health are encountered throughout history. Ergotism, also known as ‘St. Anthony’s fire’ occurred in several areas in Europe during the tenth century and was caused by the consumption of rye containing ergot alkaloids, produced by the fungus Claviceps purpurea. In 1962, 100,000 turkeys died in the South Eastern area of England of Turkey X disease, linked to aflatoxins from Aspergillus flavus.

Driven by this impact of mycotoxins throughout history, research efforts progressively increased to develop mitigation strategies based on risk monitoring, risk characterization, prevention, intervention and remediation strategies for multiple mycotoxins. However, monitoring and good agricultural, storage and transportation practices along with an effective Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point approach do not completely prevent mycotoxin presence in the food or feed chain.

Therefore, permanent research efforts are needed which explore new strategies to avoid mycotoxin occurrence during growth of the crop or to reduce mycotoxins during later processing. Although chemical control of toxigenic fungi is by far the most efficient, new legislation on a more sustainable and restricted use of fungicides urges for new approaches.

Two interesting strategies to reduce mycotoxins are biocontrol and mycotoxin detoxification. Biocontrol, which is often applied in the field during growth of the crop, comprises the use of living organisms to control a pathogen.

Biocontrol strategies are often not enough to eradicate a pathogenic species, but they control the invader in a way that it becomes manageable. Optimal biocontrol of toxigenic fungal species should not only result in reduced fungal load but should also result in reduced mycotoxin levels.

Mycotoxin detoxification strategies are often applied post-harvest. These strategies comprise several approaches such as chemical removal, physical binding, or biological degradation of mycotoxins.

In the present Special Issue, we welcome both original research and review articles on biocontrol and post-harvest detoxification strategies of the most important mycotoxins.

Prof. Dr. Siska Croubels
Prof. Dr. Kris Audenaert
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Toxins is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • mycotoxins
  • biocontrol
  • biological detoxification
  • micro-organisms
  • chemical detoxification
  • physical detoxification
  • competition for niche
  • antibiosis
  • induced systemic resistance

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle A Novel Adsorbent Magnetic Graphene Oxide Modified with Chitosan for the Simultaneous Reduction of Mycotoxins
Received: 20 June 2018 / Revised: 21 August 2018 / Accepted: 24 August 2018 / Published: 6 September 2018
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Abstract
A novel magnetic graphene oxide modified with chitosan (MGO-CTS) was synthesised as an adsorbent aimed to examine the simultaneous removal of mycotoxins. The composite was characterised by various procedures, namely Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and a scanning electron microscope (SEM).
[...] Read more.
A novel magnetic graphene oxide modified with chitosan (MGO-CTS) was synthesised as an adsorbent aimed to examine the simultaneous removal of mycotoxins. The composite was characterised by various procedures, namely Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The adsorption evaluation was considered via pH effects, initial mycotoxin concentration, adsorption time and temperature. Adsorption isotherm data and kinetics experiments were acquired at the optimum pH 5 fit Freundlich isotherm as well as pseudo-second-order kinetic models. The thermodynamic results indicated that the adsorption of the mycotoxins was spontaneous, endothermic and favourable. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Effective Adsorption of Patulin from Apple Juice by Using Non-Cytotoxic Heat-Inactivated Cells and Spores of Alicyclobacillus Strains
Received: 31 July 2018 / Revised: 18 August 2018 / Accepted: 22 August 2018 / Published: 25 August 2018
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Abstract
Patulin (PAT) is a major threat to many food products, especially apple and apple products, causing human health risks and economic losses. The aim of this study was to remove PAT from apple juice by using the heat-inactivated (HI) cells and spores of
[...] Read more.
Patulin (PAT) is a major threat to many food products, especially apple and apple products, causing human health risks and economic losses. The aim of this study was to remove PAT from apple juice by using the heat-inactivated (HI) cells and spores of seven Alicyclobacillus strains under controlled conditions. The HI cells and spores of seven strains adsorbed PAT effectively, and the HI cells and spores of Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius DSM 451 (A51) showed maximum PAT adsorption capacity of up to 12.6 μg/g by HI cells and 11.8 μg/g by HI spores at 30 °C and pH 4.0 for 24 h. Moreover, the PAT adsorption process followed the pseudo-first order kinetic model and the Freundlich isotherm model; thermodynamic parameters revealed that PAT adsorption is a spontaneous exothermic physisorption process. The results also indicated that PAT adsorption is strain-specific. The HI cells and spores of Alicyclobacillus strains are non-cytotoxic, and the bioadsorption of PAT did not affect the quality of the juice. Furthermore, the cell wall surface plays an important role in the adsorption process. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Effects of Feeding a Mycotoxin Binder on Nutrient Digestibility, Alkaloid Recovery in Feces, and Performance of Lambs Fed Diets Contaminated with Cereal Ergot
Received: 29 May 2018 / Revised: 5 July 2018 / Accepted: 30 July 2018 / Published: 1 August 2018
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Abstract
As contamination with cereal ergot has been increasing in western Canada, this study evaluated impacts of feeding a mycotoxin binder (Biomin® II; BB) on nutrient digestibility, alkaloid recovery in feces, and lamb growth performance. Forty-eight ram lambs (25.9 ± 1.4 kg) were
[...] Read more.
As contamination with cereal ergot has been increasing in western Canada, this study evaluated impacts of feeding a mycotoxin binder (Biomin® II; BB) on nutrient digestibility, alkaloid recovery in feces, and lamb growth performance. Forty-eight ram lambs (25.9 ± 1.4 kg) were randomly assigned to one of four barley-based diets: Control (C), no added alkaloids, Control + BB fed at 30 g/head per day (CBB); Ergot, 2564 ppb total R + S epimers (E); Ergot + BB, 2534 ppb R + S epimers (EBB). Lambs were fed ab libitum for up to 11 weeks until slaughter at >46 kg live weight. Both average daily gain (ADG) and gain/feed ratio were greater (p < 0.01) for lambs fed C and CBB diets as compared with those containing added ergot, although dry matter intake was not affected by dietary ergot or BB. Serum prolactin concentrations were two times higher in EBB- compared with E-fed lambs (p < 0.05), although both were lower than in C or CBB (p < 0.001) lambs. Rectal temperatures were greater in lambs receiving dietary ergot (p ≤ 0.001) than in C- and CBB-fed lambs. In a digestibility study using eight ram lambs, treatment with BB increased neutral detergent fiber (NDF) digestibility (p = 0.01). Nitrogen retention (g) was greater (p < 0.05) for lambs receiving C or CBB compared with ergot-contaminated diets. Feces of EBB lambs had 38.5% greater (p < 0.001) recovery of alkaloids compared with those fed E. Based on sparing of prolactin, BB may reduce impacts of ergot alkaloids by increasing their excretion in feces. Accordingly, concentrations of dietary alkaloids, which would not harm sheep, would be increased by feeding BB. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Application of Low-Fermenting Yeast Lachancea thermotolerans for the Control of Toxigenic Fungi Aspergillus parasiticus, Penicillium verrucosum and Fusarium graminearum and Their Mycotoxins
Received: 18 May 2018 / Revised: 10 June 2018 / Accepted: 13 June 2018 / Published: 14 June 2018
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Abstract
Mycotoxins are important contaminants of food and feed. In this study, low fermenting yeast (Lachancea thermotolerans) and its derivatives were applied against toxigenic fungi and their mycotoxins. A. parasiticus, P. verrucosum and F. graminearum and their mycotoxins were exposed to
[...] Read more.
Mycotoxins are important contaminants of food and feed. In this study, low fermenting yeast (Lachancea thermotolerans) and its derivatives were applied against toxigenic fungi and their mycotoxins. A. parasiticus, P. verrucosum and F. graminearum and their mycotoxins were exposed to yeast volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and cells, respectively. VOCs reduced significantly the fungal growth (up to 48%) and the sporulation and mycotoxin synthesis (up to 96%). Very interestingly, it was shown that even 7 yeast colonies reduced Fusarium’s growth and the synthesis of its mycotoxin, deoxynivalenol (DON). Moreover, decreasing yeast nutrient concentrations did not affect the inhibition of fungal growth, but reduced DON synthesis. In addition, inactivated yeast cells were able to remove up to 82% of the ochratoxin A (OTA). As an application of these findings, the potentialities of the VOCs to protect tomatoes inoculated with F. oxysporum was explored and showed that while in the presence of VOCs, no growth was observed of F. oxysporum on the inoculated surface areas of tomatoes, in the absence of VOCs, F. oxysporum infection reached up to 76% of the tomatoes’ surface areas. These results demonstrate that the application of yeasts and their derivatives in the agriculture and food industry might be considered as a very promising and safe biocontrol approach for food contamination. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Hydrogen-Rich Water and Lactulose Protect Against Growth Suppression and Oxidative Stress in Female Piglets Fed Fusarium Toxins Contaminated Diets
Received: 7 May 2018 / Revised: 24 May 2018 / Accepted: 30 May 2018 / Published: 4 June 2018
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Abstract
The objective of the current experiment was to evaluate whether hydrogen-rich water (HRW) or lactulose (LAC) could protect against the adverse effects of Fusarium mycotoxins-contaminated diet on the growth performance and antioxidant status in weaning piglets. A total of 24 individually housed female
[...] Read more.
The objective of the current experiment was to evaluate whether hydrogen-rich water (HRW) or lactulose (LAC) could protect against the adverse effects of Fusarium mycotoxins-contaminated diet on the growth performance and antioxidant status in weaning piglets. A total of 24 individually housed female piglets were randomly assigned to receive four treatments for 25 days (six pigs/treatment): uncontaminated basal diet (negative control), mycotoxin-contaminated (MC) diet, MC diet + HRW (MC + HRW) and MC diet + LAC (MC + LAC). The plasma hydrogen levels before and after 2 h hydrogen-free water/HRW administration were detected at day 21, and the liver hydrogen levels were detected at the end of the experiment. Serum hormones related to appetite regulation, and serum and liver oxidant and antioxidant status were also measured at the end of the experiment. Results showed that both HRW and LAC treatments significantly attenuated the reduction of average daily gain (ADG) and average daily feed intake (ADFI) caused by Fusarium mycotoxins. LAC administration increased the hydrogen concentrations in plasma and liver. HRW treated group had higher plasma hydrogen levels than the MC group. Compared with the NC group, the MC group had significantly increased serum peptide YY (PYY) and cholecystokinin (CCK) levels. Interestingly, both HRW and LAC administrations had a lower reduced serum PYY and CKK levels. Most importantly, oral administration of HRW and LAC attenuated the Fusarium mycotoxins-induced oxidative stress. In conclusion, oral administration of hydrogen-rich water or lactulose could both protect against the growth reduction and oxidative damage caused by Fusarium mycotoxins. Full article
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Open AccessCommunication Fructo-Oligosaccharide (DFA III) Feed Supplementation for Mitigation of Mycotoxin Exposure in Cattle—Clinical Evaluation by a Urinary Zearalenone Monitoring System
Received: 1 May 2018 / Revised: 23 May 2018 / Accepted: 30 May 2018 / Published: 1 June 2018
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Abstract
The potential effect of difructose anhydride III (DFA III) supplementation in cattle feed was evaluated using a previously developed urinary-zearalenone (ZEN) monitoring system. Japanese Black cattle from two beef herds aged 9–10 months were used. DFA III was supplemented for two weeks. ZEN
[...] Read more.
The potential effect of difructose anhydride III (DFA III) supplementation in cattle feed was evaluated using a previously developed urinary-zearalenone (ZEN) monitoring system. Japanese Black cattle from two beef herds aged 9–10 months were used. DFA III was supplemented for two weeks. ZEN concentrations in feed were similar in both herds (0.27 and 0.22 mg/kg in roughage and concentrates, respectively), and below the maximum allowance in Japan. ZEN, α-zearalenol (α-ZOL), and β-ZOL concentrations in urine were measured using LC/MS/MS the day before DFA III administration, 9 and 14 days thereafter, and 9 days after supplementation ceased. Significant differences in ZEN, α-ZOL, β-ZOL, and total ZEN were recorded on different sampling dates. The concentration of inorganic phosphate in DFA III-supplemented animals was significantly higher than in controls on day 23 (8.4 vs. 7.7 mg/dL), suggesting a possible role of DFA III in tight junction of intestinal epithelial cells. This is the first evidence that DFA III reduces mycotoxin levels reaching the systemic circulation and excreted in urine. This preventive effect may involve an improved tight-junction-dependent intestinal barrier function. Additionally, our practical approach confirmed that monitoring of urinary mycotoxin is useful for evaluating the effects of dietary supplements to prevent mycotoxin adsorption. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Removal of Zearalenone and Zearalenols from Aqueous Solutions Using Insoluble Beta-Cyclodextrin Bead Polymer
Received: 17 April 2018 / Revised: 20 May 2018 / Accepted: 23 May 2018 / Published: 25 May 2018
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Abstract
Zearalenone (ZEN) is a Fusarium-derived mycotoxin, exerting xenoestrogenic effects in animals and humans. ZEN and its derivatives commonly occur in cereals and cereal-based products. During the biotransformation of ZEN, its reduced metabolites, α-zearalenol (α-ZEL) and β-zearalenol (β-ZEL), are formed; α-ZEL is even
[...] Read more.
Zearalenone (ZEN) is a Fusarium-derived mycotoxin, exerting xenoestrogenic effects in animals and humans. ZEN and its derivatives commonly occur in cereals and cereal-based products. During the biotransformation of ZEN, its reduced metabolites, α-zearalenol (α-ZEL) and β-zearalenol (β-ZEL), are formed; α-ZEL is even more toxic than the parent compound ZEN. Since previous studies demonstrated that ZEN and ZELs form stable complexes with β-cyclodextrins, it is reasonable to hypothesize that cyclodextrin polymers may be suitable for mycotoxin removal from aqueous solutions. In this study, the extraction of ZEN and ZELs from water, buffers, and corn beer was investigated, employing insoluble β-cyclodextrin bead polymer (BBP) as a mycotoxin-binder. Our results demonstrate that even relatively small amounts of BBP can strongly decrease the mycotoxin content of aqueous solutions (including beer). After the first application of BBP for mycotoxin binding, BBP could be completely reactivated through the elimination of ZEN from the cyclodextrin cavities by washing with a 50 v/v% ethanol-water mixture. Therefore, our study suggests that insoluble cyclodextrin polymers may be suitable tools in the future to deplete mycotoxins from contaminated drinks. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Rice Phyllosphere Bacillus Species and Their Secreted Metabolites Suppress Aspergillus flavus Growth and Aflatoxin Production In Vitro and in Maize Seeds
Received: 19 March 2018 / Revised: 9 April 2018 / Accepted: 11 April 2018 / Published: 16 April 2018
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Abstract
The emergence of super-toxigenic strains by recombination is a risk from an intensive use of intraspecific aflatoxin (AF) biocontrol agents (BCAs). Periodical alternation with interspecific-BCAs will be safer since they preclude recombination. We are developing an AF-biocontrol system using rice-associated Bacilli reported previously
[...] Read more.
The emergence of super-toxigenic strains by recombination is a risk from an intensive use of intraspecific aflatoxin (AF) biocontrol agents (BCAs). Periodical alternation with interspecific-BCAs will be safer since they preclude recombination. We are developing an AF-biocontrol system using rice-associated Bacilli reported previously (RABs). More than 50% of RABs inhibited the growth of multiple A. flavus strains, with RAB4R being the most inhibitory and RAB1 among the least. The fungistatic activity of RAB4R is associated with the lysis of A. flavus hyphal tips. In field trails with the top five fungistatic RABs, RAB4R consistently inhibited AF contamination of maize by Tox4, a highly toxigenic A. flavus strain from Louisiana corn fields. RAB1 did not suppress A. flavus growth, but strongly inhibited AF production. Total and HPLC-fractionated lipopeptides (LPs) isolated from culture filtrates of RAB1 and RAB4R also inhibited AF accumulation. LPs were stable in vitro with little loss of activity even after autoclaving, indicating their potential field efficacy as a tank-mix application. A. flavus colonization and AF were suppressed in RAB1- or RAB4R-coated maize seeds. Since RAB4R provided both fungistatic and strong anti-mycotoxigenic activities in the laboratory and field, it can be a potent alternative to atoxigenic A. flavus strains. On the other hand, RAB1 may serve as an environmentally safe helper BCA with atoxigenic A. flavus strains, due its lack of strong fungistatic and hemolytic activities. Full article
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