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Special Issue "Pilgrimage and Sustainability in the Post COVID 19 Era"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Tourism, Culture, and Heritage".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 December 2021) | Viewed by 4818

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Noga Collins-Kreiner
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, University of Haifa, 92000, Israel
Interests: pilgrimage; religious tourism; tourism; post-Covid 19 Era

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Pilgrimage, one of the world’s oldest and most basic forms of population mobility, constitutes a major phenomenon in the twenty-first century. Pilgrimage, religion, society, culture, environment, and tourism are inextricably bound together as religious travel is one of the most common motivations for travel and has many evident effects on sustainability.

This volume will present and analyze the relationship between the growing pilgrimage phenomena and sustainability from all aspects including social, cultural, and environmental. It will offer a comprehensive assessment of the intersection of pilgrimage and sustainability while providing a balanced discussion of both subjects. The range of papers will examine both specific case studies and more general issues stemming from the interaction of society, religion, culture, politics, and environment, and explore specific cases from various religions.

Special attention will be paid to the increasingly obfuscated boundary between pilgrimage, religious tourism, spiritual tourism, heritage tourism, dark tourism, and secular pilgrimage—and their impact on sustainability.

Studying the significance of the pilgrimage–sustainability relationship in the post-Covid 19 era transcends geographical and sociological aspects as it requires an interpretative holistic approach that will be analyzed in the different papers of this volume.

Prof. Dr. Noga Collins-Kreiner
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pilgrimage
  • religious tourism
  • tourism
  • post-Covid 19 era

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Harmony of Sustainability and Productivity: Korean Templestay as Sustainable Tourism
Sustainability 2022, 14(1), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14010044 - 21 Dec 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 959
Abstract
Achieving the three pillars of sustainable tourism development has long been debated in the literature. This study revealed that sustainability and productivity are not mutually exclusive, analyzing Templestay as part of Korea’s 1700-year-old cultural heritage. The study discussed the challenging case of fulfilling [...] Read more.
Achieving the three pillars of sustainable tourism development has long been debated in the literature. This study revealed that sustainability and productivity are not mutually exclusive, analyzing Templestay as part of Korea’s 1700-year-old cultural heritage. The study discussed the challenging case of fulfilling triple-bottom-line sustainable social, environmental, and economic requirements in tourism development. Templestay has enormous potential to be one of the competitive tourism products as a cultural resource, attracting visitors to local areas. The prosperity and potentiality of Templestay may offer insightful contexts to bridge the gap between a sustainable philosophy and destination productivity. The study suggests further research to investigate tourism’s ontological and epistemological nature in terms of sustainability and productivity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pilgrimage and Sustainability in the Post COVID 19 Era)
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Article
Agent-Based Modeling of the Hajj Rituals with the Possible Spread of COVID-19
Sustainability 2021, 13(12), 6923; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13126923 - 19 Jun 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1646
Abstract
With the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic continuing to spread around the globe, there is an unprecedented need to develop different approaches to containing the pandemic from spreading further. One particular case of importance is mass-gathering events. Mass-gathering events have been shown to exhibit the [...] Read more.
With the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic continuing to spread around the globe, there is an unprecedented need to develop different approaches to containing the pandemic from spreading further. One particular case of importance is mass-gathering events. Mass-gathering events have been shown to exhibit the possibility to be superspreader events; as such, the adoption of effective control strategies by policymakers is essential to curb the spread of the pandemic. This paper deals with modeling the possible spread of COVID-19 in the Hajj, the world’s largest religious gathering. We present an agent-based model (ABM) for two rituals of the Hajj: Tawaf and Ramy al-Jamarat. The model aims to investigate the effect of two control measures: buffers and face masks. We couple these control measures with a third control measure that can be adopted by policymakers, which is limiting the capacity of each ritual. Our findings show the impact of each control measure on the curbing of the spread of COVID-19 under the different crowd dynamics induced by the constraints of each ritual. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pilgrimage and Sustainability in the Post COVID 19 Era)
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Article
Tourism Accessibility and Its Impact on the Spiritual Sustainability of Sacred Sites
Sustainability 2020, 12(22), 9695; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12229695 - 20 Nov 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1208
Abstract
Religious heritage sites are defined by their nature, both religious and non-religious (historical, social, cultural, etc.), as being pilgrimage destinations, as well as tourist attractions. The main aim of this paper is to determine whether there is a relationship between tourism accessibility and [...] Read more.
Religious heritage sites are defined by their nature, both religious and non-religious (historical, social, cultural, etc.), as being pilgrimage destinations, as well as tourist attractions. The main aim of this paper is to determine whether there is a relationship between tourism accessibility and the concept of spiritual sustainability. Spiritual sustainability is presented in the paper by analyzing the concept of a sacred place and the connection it may have with tourism development. The authors have attempted to distinguish the elements determining the tourist and religious (spiritual) attractiveness of several pilgrimage sites as destinations for religious tourism, proposing a model for analyzing the connection between the two concepts studied. Two European regions have been compared—Pomerania (Poland) and Catalonia (Spain)—by analyzing 30 sacred sites (15 per region) using a combination of qualitative and quantitative research methods. The results show that a lack of accessibility positively affects the spiritual sustainability of the sites. In other cases, the impact that accessibility can have depends on the management system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pilgrimage and Sustainability in the Post COVID 19 Era)
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