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Intrapreneurship and the Social Dimension of Sustainability

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Economic and Business Aspects of Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2022) | Viewed by 3370

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department Business Administration and Marketing, University Jaume I, 12071 Castellón, Spain
Interests: Intrapreneurship; sustainability; total quality management; business excellence models; high performance work systems

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department Business Administration and Marketing, University Jaume I, 12071 Castellón, Spain
Interests: Intrapreneurship; entrepreneurship; sustainability; innovation; employee wellbeing; work conditions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A stream of research in recent years has addressed sustainable entrepreneurship as a way to balance the economic, environmental, and social dimensions in new ventures creation (e.g., Muñoz and Cohen, 2017). However, as Fischer et al. (2020) suggest, sustainability should not be treated as a binary variable, and thus sustainability performance can arise from entrepreneurial activities and behaviors inside firms (intrapreneurship) whose primary goal is not sustainability. Although research has traditionally focused on intrapreneurship at the organizational level (i.e., corporate entrepreneurship; CE) (e.g., Kuratko, 2017), the literature on intrapreneurship (e.g., Neessen et al., 2019) highlights the bottom-up nature of the construct and the importance of the entrepreneurial behavior of employees (EBE) to shape organizational strategic direction.

In this vein, there is a research gap on how entrepreneurship inside firms can contribute to corporate sustainability, particularly to its social dimension, which is considered by some authors to be the weakest one within the triple bottom line (TBL), especially compared to the environmental dimension (Wu et al., 2015, Martins and Pato, 2019). Definitions of the social dimension (e.g., Wu et al., 2015; Antolin et al., 2016; Huo et al., 2019) highlight that organizations need to commit to the wellbeing of different stakeholders, from both internal and external sides of the organization—namely, employees (i.e., issues regarding training, development, equality, working conditions, or employee wellbeing), communities (i.e., philanthropic activities), business partners (i.e., transparent transactions), or consumers (i.e., customer care, customer education).

Given this research opportunity, the aim of this Special Issue is to advance our understanding of the relationships between intrapreneurship (corporate entrepreneurship and EBE) and the social dimension of sustainability by either exploring how a social sustainability orientation is able to enhance intrapreneurship or analyzing intrapreneurship as a driver of sustainability. On the one hand, for instance, stakeholder theory or an open innovation perspective provide new insights for understanding sustainability orientation as a driver of intrapreneurship. A sustainability-oriented firm struggles to understand and satisfy the demands of its stakeholders (Shou et al. 2019), which allows the organization to acknowledge its needs and expectations and gain external knowledge (Chesbrough and Bogers, 2014) that may be relevant when developing entrepreneurial behaviors (Neessen et al., 2019). On the other hand, most of the studies carried out on the consequences of intrapreneurship analyze variables related to the positive impact it has on the overall economic performance of the company (Bierwerth et al., 2015). However, the impact of intrapreneurship on social performance according to the TBL has received little attention. In addition, it is necessary to investigate the consequences of intrapreneurship at the individual level. In this vein, some scholars (e.g., Gawke et al., 2018) have suggested that the intrapreneurial behavior of employees may relate to employee wellbeing, through crafting more resourceful versus more demanding work environments.

For this Special Issue, we welcome original contributions dealing with systematic reviews, case studies, survey findings, analytical methods, and tools that explain the relationship between entrepreneurship inside firms (CE and EBE) and the social dimension of sustainability.

Prof. Dr. Ana B. Escrig-Tena
Prof. Dr. Mercedes Segarra-Ciprés
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Corporate entrepreneurship (CE)
  • Entrepreneurial behavior of employees (EBE)
  • Social dimension
  • Work conditions
  • Employee wellbeing
  • Stakeholder engagement
  • Open innovation
  • Local communities
  • Transparent transactions
  • Customer care

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

14 pages, 378 KiB  
Article
The Influence of Dual Missions on Employees’ Meaning of Work and Turnover Intention in Social Enterprises
by Jonghun Sun and Young Woo Sohn
Sustainability 2021, 13(14), 7812; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13147812 - 13 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2551
Abstract
This study aims to examine the influence of an organization’s missions on employees’ turnover intention in the rarely studied context of social enterprises. Data collected from 236 full-time employees working for social enterprises in South Korea indicated that the negative relationship between social [...] Read more.
This study aims to examine the influence of an organization’s missions on employees’ turnover intention in the rarely studied context of social enterprises. Data collected from 236 full-time employees working for social enterprises in South Korea indicated that the negative relationship between social mission and turnover intention was mediated by the meaning of work; this mediation effect was weaker when the economic mission was stronger. The study contributes to the literature on organizational psychology (i.e., meaning of work, turnover) in the context of a new, but increasingly prevalent, organizational form—social enterprises. It also provides practical advice for managers seeking to retain and empower employees and enhance the sustainability of their social enterprises. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intrapreneurship and the Social Dimension of Sustainability)
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