Special Issue "Migrant Health and Quality of Life"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Psychology of Sustainability and Sustainable Development".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 November 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Victor Counted
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
School of Psychology, Western Sydney University, Penrith, Australia
Interests: human behaviours; religion/spirituality; human–environment interactions; radicalization; mental health; migration; human flourishing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Feelings of displacement and poor quality of life—including physically, socially, psychologically—are particularly heightened for migrant communities, especially at a time when the world is grappling with a global pandemic. With about one billion people on the move globally—many of whom are impacted by the devastating effects of the COVID-19 pandemic—and increased mental health diagnoses within many migrant communities since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, there is a need to build research capacity in addressing the health needs of socially disadvantaged migrant populations globally. Nonetheless, there are reasons to believe that these health and quality of life concerns may have worsened for migrants due to their loss of resources during the COVID-19 pandemic, and the changes that followed this loss. While many citizens were anchored at their home countries, having some support from their governments and families, voluntary and non-voluntary migrants—including international students, skilled and unskilled migrant workers, refugees—were left, in most host countries, to grapple with the drastic changes and losses that came with the COVID-19 pandemic. These sudden pandemic-related changes led to considerable loss of resources within migrant communities, including but not limited to their loss of economic (e.g., financial stability, job loss), interpersonal (e.g., relationship losses, heightened social isolation), physical (e.g., displacement, nutritional deficiencies, travel and home-bond restrictions), and psychological (e.g., control over one’s life, sense of purpose, anxiety about the future in host countries) resources. The loss of physical, economic, interpersonal, and psychological resources due to the COVID-19 pandemic make migrant populations susceptible to increased stress levels and decline in health and quality of life. To fully understand the impact of the global COVID-19 health crisis on migrant populations around the world, this Special Issue will consider the multifaceted and broader contexts through which to measure and conceptualise migrant health and flourishing. Additionally, given the continuing scarcity of health research in socially disadvantaged migrant contexts, this Special Issue will provide a solid and enduring foundation to the establishment of a new critical mass in the field of migrant health and flourishing, with a commitment to influence policy and practice. A direct consequence of this issue will be 1) knowledge creation and dissemination (innovative, high-quality evidence-based research on the social, economic, and cultural factors that influence migrant health and flourishing); 2) knowledge translation (translating research into practice, program, and policies in relation to migrant health and flourishing); 3) collaboration (growing international collaborations for improving migrant health and flourishing); and iv) capacity building in health and socially disadvantaged migrant communities around the world. Cross-disciplinary empirical and theoretical contributions and policy papers, from across the health, social, and behavioural sciences, addressing any of these objectives through various theories and methodologies are welcomed.

Contributors should initially submit an abstract of up to 300 words and a brief biography by 20 June 2021 to the editor. Full papers will be due by 15 November 2021. Articles should not exceed 7000 words (including references).

Dr. Victor Counted
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Migrant health
  • Migrant Quality of Life
  • Migrant Flourishing
  • COVID-19 Recovery
  • Coping Strategies
  • Displacement and migration
  • Healthy Behaviours

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Article
Remittance Flows from Healthcare Workers in Toronto, Canada
Sustainability 2021, 13(17), 9536; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13179536 - 25 Aug 2021
Viewed by 472
Abstract
Previous research indicates that Canadian healthcare workers, particularly long-term care (LTC) workers, are frequently composed of immigrant and racialized/visible minorities (VM) who are often precariously employed, underpaid, and face significant work-related stress, violence, injuries, illness, and health inequities. Few studies, however, have analyzed [...] Read more.
Previous research indicates that Canadian healthcare workers, particularly long-term care (LTC) workers, are frequently composed of immigrant and racialized/visible minorities (VM) who are often precariously employed, underpaid, and face significant work-related stress, violence, injuries, illness, and health inequities. Few studies, however, have analyzed the contributions and impact of their labor in international contexts and on global communities. For instance, it is estimated that over CAD 5 billion-worth of remittances originate from Canada, yet no studies to date have examined the contributions of these remittances from Canadian workers, especially from urbanized regions consisting of VM and immigrants who live and/or work in diverse and multicultural places like Toronto. The present study is the first to investigate health and LTC workers’ roles and behaviors as related to remittances. The rationale for this study is to fill important knowledge gaps. Accordingly, this study asked: Do health/LTC workers in the site of study send remittances? If so, which workers send remittances, and who are the recipients of these remittances? What is the range of monetary value of annual remittances that each worker is able to send? What is the purpose of these remittances? What motivates the decision to send remittances? This mixed-methods study used a single-case design and relied on interviews and a survey. The results indicate that many LTC workers provided significant financial support to transnational families, up to CAD 15,000 annually, for a variety of reasons, including support for education and healthcare costs, or as gifts during cultural festivals. However, the inability to send remittances was also a source of distress for those who wanted to assist their families but were unable to do so. These findings raise important questions that could be directed for future research. For example, are there circumstances under which financial remittances are funded through loans or debt? What are the implications for the sustainability and impact of remittances, given the current COVID-19 pandemic and its economic effect of dampening incomes and wages, worsening migrants’ health, wellbeing, and quality of life, as well as adversely affecting recipient economies and the quality of life of global communities? Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Migrant Health and Quality of Life)
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Systematic Review
HIV Prevalence in Migrant Groups Based on Country of Origin: A Systematic Review on Data Obtained between 1993 and 2020
Sustainability 2021, 13(21), 11642; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132111642 - 21 Oct 2021
Viewed by 176
Abstract
The prevalence of internationally displaced people has been rising steadily within the last decade, creating enormous groups of migrants vulnerable to communicable diseases. This study aims to investigate HIV prevalence in migrant groups based on country of origin and present these results as [...] Read more.
The prevalence of internationally displaced people has been rising steadily within the last decade, creating enormous groups of migrants vulnerable to communicable diseases. This study aims to investigate HIV prevalence in migrant groups based on country of origin and present these results as weighted estimates on HIV prevalence based on geographical origin. Furthermore, HIV prevalence by country of origin is compared to WHO estimated prevalence in these countries. A systematic literature search has been conducted, and risk of bias in the included studies has been assessed. A ratio termed the Migration/Origin ratio, expressing weighted estimates on HIV prevalence among migrants by country of origin compared to the WHO estimated HIV prevalence in the country of origin, was constructed to compare the yields of this study to WHO prevalence estimates. Based on the search strategies covering the years 1990 to February 2021, 2295 articles were identified. The articles were screened by title and/or abstract, and retrieved articles were screened by full manuscript, leading to a final inclusion of 49 studies. HIV prevalence among migrants originating from the Middle East was 0.11%, Southeast Asia 1.50%, Eastern Europe 0.44%, Latin America 0.74%, North-, East-, West-, Central- and Southern Africa 1.90%, 3.69%, 2.60%, 3.75% and 3.92%, respectively. The overall Migration/Origin ratio was 2.1. HIV prevalence among migrants originating from countries with a high HIV prevalence was generally higher than among the autochthonous population. Several HIV prevalence estimates among migrants according to country of origin varied from WHO estimates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Migrant Health and Quality of Life)
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