Special Issue "Design for Sustainability—Axiomatic Design Science and Applications"

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Nam N. P. Suh
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA, USA
2. Director of the Park Center, Boston, MA, USA
Interests: design engineering and science; axiomatic design; complex systems design
Prof. Miguel Cavique
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Science and Technology, NOVA University Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: HVAC systems; energy engineering; design of complex systems; axiomatic design
Prof. Chris Brown
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Mechanical Engineering Department, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, MA 01609, USA
Interests: axiomatic design; surface metrology; sports engineering
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dominik Matt
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Faculty of Science and Technology, Industrial Engineering and Automation, Free University of Bolzano-Bozen, Bolzano, Italy
2. Director of Fraunhofer Italia Research, Bolzano, Italy
Interests: artificial intelligence in manufacturing; smart factory; digital transformation; lean and agile production; axiomatic design
Prof. Gabriele Arcidiacono
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Innovation and Information Engineering (DIIE), Guglielmo Marconi University, Rome, Italy
Interests: lean six sigma; design for x; axiomatic design; healthcare system design; design methodologies
Dr. Erwin Rauch
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Science and Technology, Industrial Engineering and Automation, Free University of Bolzano-Bozen, Bolzano, Italy
Interests: Industry 4.0; smart manufacturing; sustainable manufacturing; worker assistance systems; axiomatic design
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, there has been a remarkable increase in our awareness of the need for more sustainability to save our planet. Contrary to earlier goals, which were mainly aimed at economic aspects or quality aspects, today we also need to integrate ecological and social aspects in all our thoughts and actions. This also requires engineers to rethink the design of systems, processes, and products. As engineering is at the interface between science, technology, and society, it is also the responsibility of engineers to create a better and more sustainable world based on a long-term oriented and thoughtful engineering design.

Sustainable design aims to use economically viable processes that minimize negative environmental impacts while conserving energy and natural resources. This includes the use of environmentally friendly materials or energy-efficient manufacturing processes, as well as the reduction of CO2 emission due to transportation of our products.

Sustainable design also improves the health and safety of employees and humans in general. We are therefore also looking for contributions of how engineering design can strengthen the well-being of people in our factories and in society.

By integrating sustainability into engineering education, we can promote awareness for sustainability also among the next generation of engineers. To this end, it is important to find the right teaching methods and approaches to sensitize young engineers to this topic.

Further, such changes in engineering design thinking also imply the need for more ethics in the context with design and especially with new and emerging technologies such as artificial intelligence.

These are just a few examples of how design for sustainability can be applied to engineering.

To make a contribution to the sustainable shaping of our Earth, this Special Issue represents a collection of theoretical models as well as practical case studies related to engineering design for sustainability. 

Submissions to the Special Issue could relate but are not limited to the following topics:

  • Design of complex systems
  • Innovative design
  • Industry 4.0
  • Open design
  • Engineering design education
  • Advances in axiomatic design
  • Advances in design theories
  • Engineering design for sustainability
  • Ethical issues in engineering design

Prof. Nam N. P. Suh
Prof. Miguel Cavique
Prof. Christopher Brown
Prof. Dominik Matt
Prof. Gabriele Arcidiacono
Dr. Erwin Rauch
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Design
  • Sustainability
  • Axiomatic design
  • Industry 4.0

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Sustainable Manufacture of Bearing Bushing Parts
Sustainability 2021, 13(19), 10777; https://doi.org/10.3390/su131910777 - 28 Sep 2021
Viewed by 267
Abstract
Bearing bushing parts are used to support other rotating moving parts. When these bearing bushings are made of bronze, their inner cylindrical surfaces can be finished by turning. The problem addressed in this paper was that of identifying an alternative for finishing by [...] Read more.
Bearing bushing parts are used to support other rotating moving parts. When these bearing bushings are made of bronze, their inner cylindrical surfaces can be finished by turning. The problem addressed in this paper was that of identifying an alternative for finishing by turning the inner cylindrical surfaces of bearing bushing parts by taking into account the specific sustainability requirements. Three alternatives for finishing turning the inner cylindrical surfaces of bearing bushings have been identified. The selection of the alternative that ensures the highest probability that the diameter of the machined surface is included in the prescribed tolerance field was made first by using the second axiom of the axiomatic design. It was thus observed that for the initial turning alternative, the probability of success assessed by using a normal distribution is 77.2%, while for the third alternative, which will correspond to a Maxwell–Boltzmann distribution, the probability of success is 92.1%. A more detailed analysis was performed using the analytic hierarchy process method, taking into account distinct criteria for assessing sustainability. The criteria for evaluating the sustainability of a cutting processing process were identified using principles from the systemic analysis. The application of the analytic hierarchy process method facilitated the approach of some detailed aspects of the sustainability of the alternatives proposed for finishing by turning the inner cylindrical surfaces of bearing bushings, including by taking into account economic, social, and environmental protection requirements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design for Sustainability—Axiomatic Design Science and Applications)
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