Special Issue "Ophthalmic Drug Delivery"

A special issue of Pharmaceutics (ISSN 1999-4923).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 July 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Francisco Javier Otero-Espinar
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pharmacology, Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Santiago de Compostela (USC), 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Spain
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Anxo Fernández Ferreiro
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Pharmacy Group. Health Research Institute Santiago Compostela (IDIS. SERGAS) CP 15701 Spain
Interests: ocular drug delivery; ocular pharmacokinetic; drug development; pharmacogenetics; clinical and translational research
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Research in ophthalmic drug delivery has developed significant advances in the last years, and efforts have been made to develop more effective topical formulations to increase the drug bioavailability, efficiency, and safety. Drug delivery to the posterior segment of the eye remains a great challenge in the pharmaceutical industry due to the complexity and particularity of the anatomy and physiology of the eye. Some advances have been made with the purpose of maintaining constant drug levels in the site of action. The anatomical ocular barriers have a great impact on drug pharmacokinetics and, subsequently, on the pharmacological effect.

Despite the increasing interest in efficiently reaching the posterior segment of the eye with reduced adverse effects, there is still a need to expand knowledge of ocular pharmacokinetics that allows the development of safer and more innovative drug delivery systems. These novel approaches may greatly help to improve the lives of patients with ocular pathologies.

In this Special Issue, our goal is to highlight papers describing the advances in ophthalmic drug delivery systems for topical and specialized ocular administration.

Prof. Dr. Francisco Javier Otero-Espinar
Dr. Anxo Fernández Ferreiro
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmaceutics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ocular pharmacokinetics
  • ocular drug delivery systems
  • ocular routs of drug administration
  • intravitreal administration
  • topical administration

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
Novel Sustained-Release Drug Delivery System for Dry Eye Therapy by Rebamipide Nanoparticles
Pharmaceutics 2020, 12(2), 155; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics12020155 (registering DOI) - 14 Feb 2020
Abstract
The commercially available rebamipide ophthalmic suspension (CA-REB) was approved for clinical use in patients with dry eye; however, the residence time on the ocular surface for the traditional formulations is short, since the drug is removed from the ocular surface through the nasolacrimal [...] Read more.
The commercially available rebamipide ophthalmic suspension (CA-REB) was approved for clinical use in patients with dry eye; however, the residence time on the ocular surface for the traditional formulations is short, since the drug is removed from the ocular surface through the nasolacrimal duct. In this study, we designed a novel sustained-release drug delivery system (DDS) for dry eye therapy by rebamipide nanoparticles. The rebamipide solid nanoparticle-based ophthalmic formulation (REB-NPs) was prepared by a bead mill using additives (2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin and methylcellulose) and a gel base (carbopol). The rebamipide particles formed are ellipsoid, with a particle size in the range of 40–200 nm. The rebamipide in the REB-NPs applied to eyelids was delivered into the lacrimal fluid through the meibomian glands, and sustained drug release was observed in comparison with CA-REB. Moreover, the REB-NPs increased the mucin levels in the lacrimal fluid and healed tear film breakup levels in an N-acetylcysteine-treated rabbit model. The information about this novel DDS route and creation of a nano-formulation can be used to design further studies aimed at therapy for dry eye. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ophthalmic Drug Delivery)
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Retinal Cell Protection in Ocular Excitotoxicity Diseases. Possible Alternatives Offered by Microparticulate Drug Delivery Systems and Future Prospects
Pharmaceutics 2020, 12(2), 94; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics12020094 (registering DOI) - 24 Jan 2020
Abstract
Excitotoxicity seems to play a critical role in ocular neurodegeneration. Excess-glutamate-mediated retinal ganglion cells death is the principal cause of cell loss. Uncontrolled glutamate in the synapsis has significant implications in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. The exploitation of various approaches of controlled [...] Read more.
Excitotoxicity seems to play a critical role in ocular neurodegeneration. Excess-glutamate-mediated retinal ganglion cells death is the principal cause of cell loss. Uncontrolled glutamate in the synapsis has significant implications in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. The exploitation of various approaches of controlled release systems enhances the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic activity of drugs. In particular, microparticles are secure, can maintain therapeutic drug concentrations in the eye for prolonged periods, and make intimate contact by improving drug bioavailability. According to the promising results reported, possible new investigations will focus intense attention on microparticulate formulations and can be expected to open the field to new alternatives for doctors, as currently required by patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ophthalmic Drug Delivery)
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