Special Issue "Beneficial Features of Probiotic Microorganisms in Supplementing the Gut-Microbiota"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Prebiotics and Probiotics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Henning Sommermeyer
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Medicine, The President Stanisław Wojciechowski State University of Applied Sciences in Kalisz, Nowy Šwiat 4, 62-800 Kalisz, Poland
Interests: gut microbiota; microbiota; probiotics; synbiotics; prebiotics; antibiotics; multi-drug resistance; Clostridioides difficile; Salmonella typhimurium; Klebsiella pneumoniae; infantile colic hospital infections

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Probiotics are live microorganisms which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host (WHO definition). While there is still a shortage of evidence-based efficacy data, a worldwide increase in the usage of products containing probiotic microorganisms can be observed. The list of diseases for which beneficial effects of probiotics or synbiotics (combining probiotic and prebiotic components) are claimed is long and growing. With a large number of products now on the market, selecting the most appropriate product for a given condition is a challenge. Few studies have focused on identifying beneficial probiotics/synbiotics characteristics. More research is needed to establish a better understanding of the differences between probiotics/synbiotics from the different categories (e.g., mono-strain vs. multi-strain, bacterial vs. yeast, probiotics vs. synbiotics). In the best of all cases, this Special Issue focuses on experiments (non-clinical or clinical) in which probiotics/synbiotics are compared head-to-head for human health. It is assumed that this kind of studies will support physicians (and their patients) in regard to their treatment decisions and will provide guidance for future product development.

Prof. Dr. Henning Sommermeyer
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Dysbiosis
  • Gut microbiota
  • Probiotic health benefits
  • Mono-strain probiotics
  • Multi-strain Probiotics
  • Mono-strain synbiotics
  • Multi-strain synbiotics
  • Bacterial probiotics
  • Yeast probiotics
  • Prebiotics

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Effects of Probiotic NVP-1704 on Mental Health and Sleep in Healthy Adults: An 8-Week Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial
Nutrients 2021, 13(8), 2660; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13082660 - 30 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3641
Abstract
The human gut microbiome is closely linked to mental health and sleep. We aimed to verify the efficacy and safety of probiotic NVP-1704, a mixture of Lactobacillus reuteri NK33 and Bifidobacterium adolescentis NK98, in improving stress, depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbances, along with [...] Read more.
The human gut microbiome is closely linked to mental health and sleep. We aimed to verify the efficacy and safety of probiotic NVP-1704, a mixture of Lactobacillus reuteri NK33 and Bifidobacterium adolescentis NK98, in improving stress, depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbances, along with the measurement of some blood biomarkers. A total of 156 healthy adults with subclinical symptoms of depression, anxiety, and insomnia were retrospectively registered and randomly assigned to receive either NVP-1704 (n = 78) or a placebo (n = 78) for eight weeks. Participants completed the Stress Response Inventory, Beck’s Depression and Anxiety Inventory, Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index, and Insomnia Severity Index at baseline, at four and eight weeks of treatment. Pre- and post-treatment blood tests for biomarkers were conducted. After intervention, gut microbiota composition was quantified by pyrosequencing the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The NVP-1704 group had a more significant reduction in depressive symptoms at four and eight weeks of treatment, and anxiety symptoms at four weeks compared to the placebo group. Those receiving NVP-1704 also experienced an improvement in sleep quality. NVP-1704 treatment led to a decrease in serum interleukin-6 levels. Furthermore, NVP-1704 increased Bifidobacteriaceae and Lactobacillacea, whereas it decreased Enterobacteriaceae in the gut microbiota composition. Our findings suggest that probiotic NVP-1704 could be beneficial for mental health and sleep. Full article
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Article
Modulation of the Gut Microbiota Structure with Probiotics and Isoflavone Alleviates Metabolic Disorder in Ovariectomized Mice
Nutrients 2021, 13(6), 1793; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13061793 - 25 May 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1150
Abstract
The decrease in ovarian hormone secretion that occurs during menopause results in an increase in body weight and adipose tissue mass. Probiotics and soy isoflavones (SIFs) could affect the gut microbiota and exert anti-obesity effects. The objective of this study was to investigate [...] Read more.
The decrease in ovarian hormone secretion that occurs during menopause results in an increase in body weight and adipose tissue mass. Probiotics and soy isoflavones (SIFs) could affect the gut microbiota and exert anti-obesity effects. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of probiotics and a diet containing SIF (SIF diet) on ovariectomized mice with menopausal obesity, including the gut microbiome. The results demonstrate that Bifidobacterium longum 15M1 can reverse menopausal obesity, whilst the combination of Lactobacillus plantarum 30M5 and a SIF diet was more effective in alleviating menopausal lipid metabolism disorder than either components alone. Probiotics and SIFs play different anti-obesity roles in menopausal mice. Furthermore, 30M5 alters the metabolites of the gut microbiota that increase the circulating estrogen level, upregulates the expression of estrogen receptor α in abdominal adipose tissue and improves the production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). A SIF diet can significantly alter the structure of the fecal bacterial community and enrich the pathways related to SCFAs production. Moreover, 30M5 and a SIF diet acted synergistically to effectively resolve abnormal serum lipid levels in ovariectomized mice, and these effects appear to be associated with regulation of the diversity and structure of the intestinal microbiota to enhance SCFAs production and promote estrogen circulation. Full article
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Article
Effects of Probiotics on Anxiety, Stress, Mood and Fitness of Badminton Players
Nutrients 2021, 13(6), 1783; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13061783 - 24 May 2021
Viewed by 1996
Abstract
Background: Reports of probiotic consumption on athletes’ performance are debatable due to their equivocal results. There is a need for more evidence on the effects of probiotic intake on psychological state and fitness level. Thus, this study determined the effects of daily probiotic [...] Read more.
Background: Reports of probiotic consumption on athletes’ performance are debatable due to their equivocal results. There is a need for more evidence on the effects of probiotic intake on psychological state and fitness level. Thus, this study determined the effects of daily probiotic consumption on competitive anxiety, perceived stress and mood among university badminton players, besides their fitness like aerobic capacity, strength, speed, leg power and agility. Methods: Thirty university badminton players aged from 19 to 22 years old were randomly divided equally into two groups, where the probiotic group (PG; n = 15) received a drink that contained Lactobacillus casei Shirota (3 × 1010 CFU) and placebo group (CG; n = 15) a placebo drink for six weeks. Anxiety, stress and mood levels were determined using the CSAI-2R, PSS and BRUMS questionnaires, respectively. Fitness levels were measured using by subjecting the players to 20-m shuttle runs (aerobic capacity), handgrips (muscular strength), vertical jumps (leg power), 40-m dash (speed) and T-test (agility). The Student’s t-test (p < 0.05) was used to determine the differences between PG and CG players. Results: After six weeks, the anxiety and stress levels of PG players significantly decreased by 16% (p < 0.001) and 20% (p < 0.001), respectively, but there were no significant changes detected in CG players. Supplementation of probiotics also improved aerobic capacity in PG players by 5.9% (p < 0.001) but did not influence the speed, strength, leg power and agility. Conclusions: Probiotics supplementation showed improved aerobic capacity and relieve anxiety and stress. However, further studies need to be carried out to determine the mechanisms through which probiotic intake produces these effects. Full article
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