Special Issue "Dietary Intake and Musculoskeletal Health"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2018).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Jessica Kiefte-de Jong
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Global Public Health, Leiden University College, 3595 DG The Hague, The Netherlands

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Musculoskeletal diseases, such as osteoporosis, are a major health concern in ageing populations. Although various studies have shown that nutrition and lifestyle affect bone health, little is known about the complex interactions between these, as well as interactions with medication, genes, and other measures of musculoskeletal health. In this Special Issue, the state-of-the-art of the research on diet and muscoskeletal health will be presented, with particular attention to complex interactions between diet and other determinants of musculoskeletal diseases.

Dr. Jessica Kiefte-de Jong
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • dietary patterns
  • micronutrients
  • bone mineral density
  • muscle mass
  • muscle strength
  • frailty
  • fractures

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Potassium Citrate Supplementation Decreases the Biochemical Markers of Bone Loss in a Group of Osteopenic Women: The Results of a Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Pilot Study
Nutrients 2018, 10(9), 1293; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10091293 - 12 Sep 2018
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2492
Abstract
The relationship involving acid-base imbalance, mineral metabolism and bone health status has previously been reported but the efficacy of the alkalizing supplementation in targeting acid overload and preventing bone loss has not yet been fully elucidated. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, the [...] Read more.
The relationship involving acid-base imbalance, mineral metabolism and bone health status has previously been reported but the efficacy of the alkalizing supplementation in targeting acid overload and preventing bone loss has not yet been fully elucidated. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, the hypothesis that potassium citrate (K citrate) modifies bone turnover in women with postmenopausal osteopenia was tested. Three hundred and ten women were screened; 40 women met the inclusion criteria and were randomly assigned to the treatment or the placebo group. They were treated with K citrate (30 mEq day−1) or a placebo in addition to calcium carbonate (500 mg day−1) and vitamin D (400 IU day−1). At baseline and time points of 3 and 6 months, serum indicators of renal function, electrolytes, calciotropic hormones, serum bone turnover markers (BTMs) (tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRACP5b), carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX), bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP), procollagen type 1 N terminal propeptide (PINP)), and urine pH, electrolytes, and citrate were measured. The follow-up was completed by 17/20 patients in the “K citrate” group and 18/20 patients in the “placebo” group. At baseline, 90% of the patients exhibited low potassium excretion in 24 h urine samples, and 85% of cases had at least one urine parameter associated with low-grade acidosis (low pH, low citrate excretion). After treatment, CTX and BAP decreased significantly in both groups, but subjects with evidence of low-grade acidosis gained significant benefits from the treatment compared to the placebo. In patients with low 24h-citrate excretion at baseline, a 30% mean decrease in BAP and CTX was observed at 6 months. A significant reduction was also evident when low citrate (BAP: −25%; CTX: −35%) and a low pH (BAP: −25%; CTX: −30%) were found in fasting-morning urine. In conclusion, our results suggested that K citrate supplementation improved the beneficial effects of calcium and vitamin D in osteopenic women with a documented potassium and citrate deficit, and a metabolic profile consistent with low-grade acidosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Intake and Musculoskeletal Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Royal Jelly Delays Motor Functional Impairment During Aging in Genetically Heterogeneous Male Mice
Nutrients 2018, 10(9), 1191; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10091191 - 01 Sep 2018
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 2076
Abstract
Aging is associated with motor disorders that decrease the quality of life (QOL). Royal jelly (RJ), used as a dietary supplement, has shown various health benefits and, therefore, it has the potential to improve the QOL during aging. We have previously developed protease [...] Read more.
Aging is associated with motor disorders that decrease the quality of life (QOL). Royal jelly (RJ), used as a dietary supplement, has shown various health benefits and, therefore, it has the potential to improve the QOL during aging. We have previously developed protease enzyme-treated RJ to avoid the anaphylactic response induced by RJ supplementation. However, the effects of a lifelong treatment with RJ on normal aging have not been fully clarified. In this study, we investigated the effects of enzyme-untreated RJ (NRJ) and enzyme-treated RJ (ERJ) on the aging process focusing on motor functions, by using a genetically heterogeneous (HET) mouse model experimentally endowed with genetic diversity. We performed four different physical performance tests (grip strength, wire hang, horizontal bar, and rotarod). We showed that the age-related impairment of the motor functions was significantly delayed in RJ-treated mice. Both NRJ and ERJ were similarly effective against these types of aging-associated declines. Histological analyses revealed that the RJ treatment affected the muscle fiber size at an advanced age. We also demonstrated that age-related changes in muscle satellite cell markers and catabolic genes were affected in RJ-treated mice. These results suggest that non-protein components of RJ improved the motor function in aging mice. These findings indicate that RJ has the potential to change the QOL during aging by regulating the motor function. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Intake and Musculoskeletal Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Vegetable Diversity, Injurious Falls, and Fracture Risk in Older Women: A Prospective Cohort Study
Nutrients 2018, 10(8), 1081; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10081081 - 13 Aug 2018
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1973
Abstract
The importance of vegetable diversity for the risk of falling and fractures is unclear. Our objective was to examine the relationship between vegetable diversity with injurious falling and fractures leading to hospitalization in a prospective cohort of older Australian women (n = [...] Read more.
The importance of vegetable diversity for the risk of falling and fractures is unclear. Our objective was to examine the relationship between vegetable diversity with injurious falling and fractures leading to hospitalization in a prospective cohort of older Australian women (n = 1429, ≥70 years). Vegetable diversity was quantified by assessing the number of different vegetables consumed daily. Vegetable intake (75 g servings/day) was estimated using a validated food frequency questionnaire at baseline (1998). Over 14.5 years, injurious falls (events = 568, 39.7%), and fractures (events = 404, 28.3%) were captured using linked health records. In multivariable-adjusted Cox regression models, women with greater vegetable diversity (per increase in one different vegetable/day) had lower relative hazards for falls (8%; p = 0.02) and fractures (9%; p = 0.03). A significant interaction between daily vegetable diversity (number/day) and total vegetable intake (75 g servings/day) was observed for falls (pinteraction = 0.03) and fractures (pinteraction < 0.001). The largest benefit of higher vegetable diversity were observed in the one third of women with the lowest vegetable intake (<2.2 servings/day; falls HR 0.83 95% CI (0.71–0.98); fractures HR 0.74 95% CI (0.62–0.89)). Increasing vegetable diversity especially in older women with low vegetable intake may be an effective way to reduce injurious fall and fracture risk. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Intake and Musculoskeletal Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Long-Term Dietary Intake of Chia Seed Is Associated with Increased Bone Mineral Content and Improved Hepatic and Intestinal Morphology in Sprague-Dawley Rats
Nutrients 2018, 10(7), 922; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10070922 - 19 Jul 2018
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2924
Abstract
Chia seeds (Salvia hispanica) provide an unusually high content of α-linolenic acid with several potential health benefits, but few studies have examined the long-term intake of n-3 fatty acid-rich plant foods such as chia. In this work, we investigated some [...] Read more.
Chia seeds (Salvia hispanica) provide an unusually high content of α-linolenic acid with several potential health benefits, but few studies have examined the long-term intake of n-3 fatty acid-rich plant foods such as chia. In this work, we investigated some of the effects of a diet containing 10% chia seeds versus a conventional isocaloric diet for 10 and 13 months on body measurements, musculoskeletal system, the liver, and the intestines of 20 male Sprague-Dawley rats assigned into two groups. The n-6/n-3 ratios for the control and chia diets were 7.46 and 1.07, respectively. For the first 10 months of the diet, the body parameters and weights were similar, but at 13 months, the bone mineral content (BMC) of the chia-fed rats was significantly higher than that of the controls whether in total or proximal areas of the left tibia. Also, significant positive correlations were found between the age of the chia group and the bone mineral density, BMC, weight of the musculoskeletal system, final body weight, and skin weight. Liver and intestinal examinations showed improved morphology associated with lower lipid deposit in hepatocytes and increased intestinal muscle layers and crypt size in the chia group. This study provides new data suggesting the potential benefits associated with the long-term intake of chia seeds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Intake and Musculoskeletal Health)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
An Update on Protein, Leucine, Omega-3 Fatty Acids, and Vitamin D in the Prevention and Treatment of Sarcopenia and Functional Decline
Nutrients 2018, 10(8), 1099; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10081099 - 16 Aug 2018
Cited by 37 | Viewed by 7379
Abstract
Aging is associated with sarcopenia and functional decline, leading to frailty and disability. As a modifiable risk factor, nutrition may represent a target for preventing or postponing the onset of these geriatric conditions. Among nutrients, high-quality protein, leucine, vitamin D, and omega-3 polyunsaturated [...] Read more.
Aging is associated with sarcopenia and functional decline, leading to frailty and disability. As a modifiable risk factor, nutrition may represent a target for preventing or postponing the onset of these geriatric conditions. Among nutrients, high-quality protein, leucine, vitamin D, and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) are of particular interest for their demonstrated effects on skeletal muscle health. This narrative review aims to examine the recent observational and interventional evidence on the associations and the role of these nutrients in the muscle mass, strength, mobility, and physical function of free-living older adults, who are either healthy or at risk of frailty. Recent evidence supports a higher protein intake recommendation of 1.0–1.2 g/kg/day in healthy older adults; an evenly distributed mealtime protein intake or minimal protein per meal may be beneficial. In addition, vitamin D supplementation of 800–1000 IU, particularly when vitamin D status is low, and doses of ~3 g/day of n-3 PUFA may be favorable for physical function, muscle mass, and strength. Reviewed studies are highly heterogenous, yet the quantity, quality, and timing of intakes should be considered when designing intervention studies. Combined protein, leucine, vitamin D, and n-3 PUFA supplements may convey added benefits and may represent an intervention strategy in the prevention of sarcopenia and functional decline. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Intake and Musculoskeletal Health)
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Open AccessReview
Osteoarthritis and the Mediterranean Diet: A Systematic Review
Nutrients 2018, 10(8), 1030; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10081030 - 07 Aug 2018
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 4135
Abstract
Osteoarthritis (OA) affects 240 million people globally. Few studies have examined the links between osteoarthritis and the Mediterranean diet (MD). The aim of this paper was to systematically review and analyze the epidemiological evidence in humans on the MD and its association with [...] Read more.
Osteoarthritis (OA) affects 240 million people globally. Few studies have examined the links between osteoarthritis and the Mediterranean diet (MD). The aim of this paper was to systematically review and analyze the epidemiological evidence in humans on the MD and its association with OA. A systematic search of EMBASE identified three studies that explored the association between MD and OA. Two of them were cross-sectional and the third one was a 16-week randomized clinical trial. Prisma declaration was followed to carry out this review. These studies described a positive association between a higher adherence to a MD and the quality of life of participants suffering OA. The prevalence of OA was lower in participants with a higher adherence to a Mediterranean diet. Biomarkers of inflammation and cartilage degradation related to OA were also analyzed and significant differences were detected only for IL1-α, which decreased in the MD group. Exploring the relationship between MD and OA is complex, moreover, the limited evidence and methodological differences in such studies makes it difficult to compare results. In conclusion, the three studies included in this systematic review demonstrated some relation between osteoarthritis and a Mediterranean diet. However, prospective and longer interventions are required to evaluate the long-term efficacy of the Mediterranean diet to improve symptomatology and preventing osteoarthritis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Intake and Musculoskeletal Health)
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Open AccessReview
Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Duchenne and Becker Muscular Dystrophy—Implications for Therapies
Nutrients 2018, 10(6), 796; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10060796 - 20 Jun 2018
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 3259
Abstract
The interactions between nutrition and metabolism and skeletal muscle have long been known. Muscle is the major metabolic organ—it consumes more calories than other organs—and therefore, there is a clear need to discuss these interactions and provide some direction for future research areas [...] Read more.
The interactions between nutrition and metabolism and skeletal muscle have long been known. Muscle is the major metabolic organ—it consumes more calories than other organs—and therefore, there is a clear need to discuss these interactions and provide some direction for future research areas regarding muscle pathologies. In addition, new experiments and manuscripts continually reveal additional highly intricate, reciprocal interactions between metabolism and muscle. These reciprocal interactions include exercise, age, sex, diet, and pathologies including atrophy, hypoxia, obesity, diabetes, and muscle myopathies. Central to this review are the metabolic changes that occur in the skeletal muscle cells of muscular dystrophy patients and mouse models. Many of these metabolic changes are pathogenic (inappropriate body mass changes, mitochondrial dysfunction, reduced adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels, and increased Ca2+) and others are compensatory (increased phosphorylated AMP activated protein kinase (pAMPK), increased slow fiber numbers, and increased utrophin). Therefore, reversing or enhancing these changes with therapies will aid the patients. The multiple therapeutic targets to reverse or enhance the metabolic pathways will be discussed. Among the therapeutic targets are increasing pAMPK, utrophin, mitochondrial number and slow fiber characteristics, and inhibiting reactive oxygen species. Because new data reveals many additional intricate levels of interactions, new questions are rapidly arising. How does muscular dystrophy alter metabolism, and are the changes compensatory or pathogenic? How does metabolism affect muscular dystrophy? Of course, the most profound question is whether clinicians can therapeutically target nutrition and metabolism for muscular dystrophy patient benefit? Obtaining the answers to these questions will greatly aid patients with muscular dystrophy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Intake and Musculoskeletal Health)
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