Special Issue "Dietary Bean Consumption and Human Health"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 July 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Henry J. Thompson
Website
Guest Editor
Cancer Prevention Laboratory, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
Interests: food patterns; dietary patterns; chronic disease; prevent and control; nutrient sensing; energy sensing; energy balance; gut-associated microbiome; immune system
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Pulse crops, i.e., grain legumes, are staple foods that are characteristic components of dietary patterns associated with human health, but their consumption is now very low in most developed countries. The United Nations sponsored “International Year of the Pulse” has renewed interest in this food source. There are economic and environmental arguments for maintaining the consumption of pulse crops as a primary source of dietary protein and fiber. However, only limited attention has been directed to the potential health benefits of retaining pulses as a primary food source in Western diets. Of the four most prominent pulses, common bean is consumed in the largest amount per capita and is a focus of this Special Issue on “Dietary Bean Consumption and Human Health” in Nutrients. However, research in which other pulses are investigated will also be considered. The aim of this Special Issue is to provide a source for accurate, up-to-date scientific information on this topic. We invite you and your co-workers to consider submission of your original research findings or a review article on the topic. Manuscripts can focus on a broad range of health related issues including: 1) micronutrient nutrition, 2) chronic disease (obesity, type-2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and/or cancer) prevention and control, 3) agronomic traits related to human health (e.g. cooking time), 4) the microbiome and gut health, 5) immune regulation, 5) closing the dietary fiber gap, 6) amino acid availability as it relates to mTOR regulation, 6) cultural and psychosocial determinants of common bean consumption, 7) xenohormesis as it relates common bean domestication, 8) the use of genomic data on common bean to improve human health characteristics of this food source, and the design of human cuisines intended to increase common bean consumption, 9) the use of common bean seed to produce microgreens, and 10) the identification of bioactive components of common bean. We encourage authors to discuss the impact of their results on efforts to increase consumption of common bean and other pulses and to identify gaps in knowledge that can guide future research studies.

Prof. Dr. Henry J. Thompson
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Phaseolus vulgarus
  • Chronic disease prevention and control
  • Nutrients
  • Nutrient deficiencies
  • Trace elements
  • Vitamins
  • Bioactives
  • Phytochemicals
  • Microbiome
  • Immune surveillance
  • Obesity
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Type 2 Diabetes
  • Cancer
  • Inflammation
  • Insulin resistance
  • Glucose homeostasis
  • Cellular oxidation
  • Cell proliferation
  • Apoptosis
  • Angiogenesis

Published Papers (9 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research, Review

Open AccessEditorial
Dietary Bean Consumption and Human Health
Nutrients 2019, 11(12), 3074; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11123074 - 17 Dec 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The focus of this Special Issue is on grain legumes, which are commonly referred to as pulses [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Bean Consumption and Human Health)

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Review

Open AccessArticle
White Kidney Bean (Phaseolus Vulgaris L.) Consumption Reduces Fat Accumulation in a Polygenic Mouse Model of Obesity
Nutrients 2019, 11(11), 2780; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112780 - 15 Nov 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
Clinical studies indicate that eating common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L., plays a role in body weight regulation but mechanisms have yet to be elucidated. Here, we investigated the anti-obesogenic activity of white kidney bean in a mouse model of dietary-induced obesity. Bean consumption [...] Read more.
Clinical studies indicate that eating common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L., plays a role in body weight regulation but mechanisms have yet to be elucidated. Here, we investigated the anti-obesogenic activity of white kidney bean in a mouse model of dietary-induced obesity. Bean consumption reduced the accumulation of adipose tissue in male and female C57BL6 mice. The anti-obesogenic effect of white kidney bean was not due to alterations in energy intake, energy excreted in the feces, or feed efficiency ratio. While bean consumption increased the mass of the intestine, no marked differences were consistently observed in crypt height, mucin content of goblet cells, proliferation index or zone of proliferation. However, significantly higher concentrations of total bacteria and of Akkermansia muciniphila were detected in cecal content of bean-fed mice, and the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes was reduced. Bile acid content was higher in the ileum of bean-fed mice, but transcript levels of farnesoid X receptor were not significantly affected. Whether changes in bile-acid-mediated cell signaling play a role in bean-related differences in fat accumulation and/or overall metabolic health requires further investigation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Bean Consumption and Human Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Improving the Health Benefits of Snap Bean: Genome-Wide Association Studies of Total Phenolic Content
Nutrients 2019, 11(10), 2509; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102509 - 18 Oct 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Snap beans are a significant source of micronutrients in the human diet. Among the micronutrients present in snap beans are phenolic compounds with known beneficial effects on human health, potentially via their metabolism by the gut-associated microbiome. The genetic pathways leading to the [...] Read more.
Snap beans are a significant source of micronutrients in the human diet. Among the micronutrients present in snap beans are phenolic compounds with known beneficial effects on human health, potentially via their metabolism by the gut-associated microbiome. The genetic pathways leading to the production of phenolics in snap bean pods remain uncertain. In this study, we quantified the level of total phenolic content (TPC) in the Bean Coordinated Agriculture Program (CAP) snap bean diversity panel of 149 accessions. The panel was characterized spectrophotometrically for phenolic content with a Folin–Ciocalteu colorimetric assay. Flower, seed and pod color were also quantified, as red, purple, yellow and brown colors are associated with anthocyanins and flavonols in common bean. Genotyping was performed through an Illumina Infinium Genechip BARCBEAN6K_3 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) analysis identified 11 quantitative trait nucleotides (QTN) associated with TPC. An SNP was identified for TPC on Pv07 located near the P gene, which is a major switch in the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway. Candidate genes were identified for seven of the 11 TPC QTN. Five regulatory genes were identified and represent novel sources of variation for exploitation in developing snap beans with higher phenolic levels for greater health benefits to the consumer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Bean Consumption and Human Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Cooked Red Lentils Dose-Dependently Modulate the Colonic Microenvironment in Healthy C57Bl/6 Male Mice
Nutrients 2019, 11(8), 1853; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081853 - 09 Aug 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Dietary pulses, including lentils, are protein-rich plant foods that are enriched in intestinal health-promoting bioactives, such as non-digestible carbohydrates and phenolic compounds. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of diets supplemented with cooked red lentils on the colonic microenvironment [...] Read more.
Dietary pulses, including lentils, are protein-rich plant foods that are enriched in intestinal health-promoting bioactives, such as non-digestible carbohydrates and phenolic compounds. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of diets supplemented with cooked red lentils on the colonic microenvironment (microbiota composition and activity and epithelial barrier integrity and function). C57Bl/6 male mice were fed one of five diets: a control basal diet (BD), a BD-supplemented diet with 5, 10 or 20% cooked red lentils (by weight), or a BD-supplemented diet with 0.7% pectin (equivalent soluble fiber level as found in the 20% lentil diet). Red lentil supplementation resulted in increased: (1) fecal microbiota α-diversity; (2) abundance of short-chain fatty acid (SCFA)-producing bacteria (e.g., Prevotella, Roseburia and Dorea spp.); (3) concentrations of fecal SCFAs; (4) mRNA expression of SCFA receptors (G-protein-coupled receptors (GPR 41 and 43) and tight/adherens junction proteins (Zona Occulden-1 (ZO-1), Claudin-2, E-cadherin). Overall, 20% lentil had the greatest impact on colon health outcomes, which were in part explained by a change in the soluble and insoluble fiber profile of the diet. These results support recent public health recommendations to increase consumption of plant-based protein foods for improved health, in particular intestinal health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Bean Consumption and Human Health)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Consumer Understanding and Culinary Use of Legumes in Australia
Nutrients 2019, 11(7), 1575; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11071575 - 12 Jul 2019
Cited by 8
Abstract
While health benefits of legume consumption are well documented, intake is well below recommendations in many Western cultures, and little is known regarding culinary use and consumer understanding of these foods. This study aimed to investigate consumption, knowledge, attitudes, and culinary use of [...] Read more.
While health benefits of legume consumption are well documented, intake is well below recommendations in many Western cultures, and little is known regarding culinary use and consumer understanding of these foods. This study aimed to investigate consumption, knowledge, attitudes, and culinary use of legumes in a convenience sample of Australians. An online computer-based survey was used to gather data and demographic characteristics. Respondents (505 individuals answered in full or in part) were regular consumers of legumes (177/376 consumed legumes 2–4 times weekly). Chickpeas, green peas, and kidney beans were most often consumed, and were made into most commonly Mexican, then Indian and Middle Eastern meals. Consumers correctly identified protein and dietary fibre (37%) as key nutritional attributes. For non-consumers (7%; 34/463), taste, a lack of knowledge of how to prepare and include legumes, and the time taken to prepare, along with family preferences, hindered consumption. Participants identified the food category as “beans” rather than “legumes”, and this may have implications for dietary guidance at an individual and policy level. Addressing barriers to consumption, perhaps through food innovation, emphasizing positive health attributes, and clarification within dietary guidelines, are important considerations for increasing consumption of legumes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Bean Consumption and Human Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Consumption of Animal-Source Protein is Associated with Improved Height-for-Age z Scores in Rural Malawian Children Aged 12–36 Months
Nutrients 2019, 11(2), 480; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11020480 - 25 Feb 2019
Cited by 7
Abstract
Linear growth faltering, caused by insufficient diet, recurrent infections and environmental enteric dysfunction (EED), continues to plague young children in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Diets in LMICs are primarily plant based, and thus have poor-quality protein and low levels of essential micronutrients. [...] Read more.
Linear growth faltering, caused by insufficient diet, recurrent infections and environmental enteric dysfunction (EED), continues to plague young children in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Diets in LMICs are primarily plant based, and thus have poor-quality protein and low levels of essential micronutrients. The aim of this study was to assess the association of the type and protein quality of food consumed with stunting, EED and acute malnutrition in children aged 6–36 months in Limera and Masenjere, two rural Southern Malawian communities. This is a secondary analysis of two randomized controlled trials that tested the effects of common bean and cowpea flour on stunting in children aged 6–36 months. We used data from two interactive 24-h dietary recalls conducted 12 weeks after enrolment into each trial. Food intakes were compared between the regions using Chi-square and Student’s t-test. There were 355 children that participated in the dietary recalls. The diets of children were of poor quality, but the children from Limera consumed more fish (54% vs. 35%, p = 0.009) and more bioavailable protein (26.0 ± 10.3 g/day vs. 23.1 ± 8.1 g/day, p = 0.018, respectively) than children in Masenjere. Food type and protein quality were not associated with any of the outcomes except an association between animal protein consumption and improvement in height-for-age z scores in children aged 12–36 months (p = 0.047). These findings support the notion that animal-source food (ASF) consumption in this vulnerable population promotes linear growth. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Bean Consumption and Human Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
The Fast Cooking and Enhanced Iron Bioavailability Properties of the Manteca Yellow Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)
Nutrients 2018, 10(11), 1609; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10111609 - 01 Nov 2018
Cited by 11
Abstract
The common dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is a nutrient-dense pulse crop that is produced globally for direct human consumption and is an important source of protein and micronutrients for millions of people across Latin America, the Caribbean and Sub-Saharan Africa. Dry [...] Read more.
The common dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is a nutrient-dense pulse crop that is produced globally for direct human consumption and is an important source of protein and micronutrients for millions of people across Latin America, the Caribbean and Sub-Saharan Africa. Dry beans require large amounts of heat energy and time to cook, which can deter consumers worldwide from using beans. In regions where consumers rely on expensive fuelwood for food preparation, the yellow bean is often marketed as fast cooking. This study evaluated the cooking time and health benefits of five major market classes within the yellow bean seed type (Amarillo, Canary, Manteca, Mayocoba, Njano) over two field seasons. This study shows how the Manteca yellow bean possesses a fast cooking phenotype, which could serve as genetic resource for introducing fast cooking properties into a new generation of dry beans with cooking times <20 min when pre-soaked and <80 min unsoaked. Mineral analysis revealed fast cooking yellow beans have high iron retention (>80%) after boiling. An in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell culture bioassay revealed a strong negative association between cooking time and iron bioavailability in yellow beans with r values = −0.76 when pre-soaked and −0.64 when unsoaked across the two field seasons. When either pre-soaked or left unsoaked, the highest iron bioavailability scores were measured in the fast cooking Manteca genotypes providing evidence that this yellow market class is worthy of germplasm enhancement through the added benefit of improved iron quality after cooking. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Bean Consumption and Human Health)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Editorial, Research

Open AccessReview
Nutritional and Bioactive Compounds in Mexican Lupin Beans Species: A Mini-Review
Nutrients 2019, 11(8), 1785; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081785 - 02 Aug 2019
Cited by 6
Abstract
As a source of bioactive compounds, species of the genus Lupinus are interesting legumes from a nutritional point of view. Although wild species are abundant and represent a potential source of nutrients and biologically active compounds, most research has focused on domesticated and [...] Read more.
As a source of bioactive compounds, species of the genus Lupinus are interesting legumes from a nutritional point of view. Although wild species are abundant and represent a potential source of nutrients and biologically active compounds, most research has focused on domesticated and semi-domesticated species, such as Lupinus angustifolius, Lupinus albus, Lupinus luteus, and Lupinus mutabilis. Therefore, in this review, we focus on recent research conducted on the wild Lupinus species of Mexico. The nutritional content of these species is characterized (similar to those of the domesticated species), including proteins (isolates), lipids, minerals, dietary fiber, and bioactive compounds, such as oligosaccharides, flavonoids, and alkaloids. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Bean Consumption and Human Health)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessReview
Mung Bean (Vigna radiata L.): Bioactive Polyphenols, Polysaccharides, Peptides, and Health Benefits
Nutrients 2019, 11(6), 1238; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061238 - 31 May 2019
Cited by 17
Abstract
Mung bean (Vigna radiata L.) is an important pulse consumed all over the world, especially in Asian countries, and has a long history of usage as traditional medicine. It has been known to be an excellent source of protein, dietary fiber, minerals, [...] Read more.
Mung bean (Vigna radiata L.) is an important pulse consumed all over the world, especially in Asian countries, and has a long history of usage as traditional medicine. It has been known to be an excellent source of protein, dietary fiber, minerals, vitamins, and significant amounts of bioactive compounds, including polyphenols, polysaccharides, and peptides, therefore, becoming a popular functional food in promoting good health. The mung bean has been documented to ameliorate hyperglycemia, hyperlipemia, and hypertension, and prevent cancer and melanogenesis, as well as possess hepatoprotective and immunomodulatory activities. These health benefits derive primarily from the concentration and properties of those active compounds present in the mung bean. Vitexin and isovitexin are identified as the major polyphenols, and peptides containing hydrophobic amino acid residues with small molecular weight show higher bioactivity in the mung bean. Considering the recent surge in interest in the use of grain legumes, we hope this review will provide a blueprint to better utilize the mung bean in food products to improve human nutrition and further encourage advancement in this field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Bean Consumption and Human Health)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop