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Special Issue "Plant Food, Nutrition and Human Health"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Pedro Mena

Department of Food & Drugs, Università degli studi di Parma (UNIPR), Parma, Italy
Website 1 | Website 2 | Website 3 | E-Mail
Interests: nutrition; phytochemicals; phenolic compounds; bioavailability; metabolism; disease prevention; liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry
Guest Editor
Dr. Donato Angelino

Department of Food & Drugs, Università degli studi di Parma (UNIPR), Parma, Italy
Website 1 | Website 2 | E-Mail
Interests: in vitro and in vivo bioavailability; bioactive compounds; (poly)phenols; gut microbiota; inflammation; functional foods

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue, “Plant Food, Nutrition and Human Health”, should shed light on how phytochemicals or plant bioactives are metabolized and turned into bioavailable molecules that are able to impact different biological processes related to human health. Among the different classes of plant bioactive compounds, phenolic compounds, glucosinolates and other sulfur compounds, carotenoids, alkaloids, and terpenes have shown promising health promotion features in epidemiological and human intervention studies dealing with the prevention of non-communicable diseases. Nevertheless, the elucidation of their metabolic fate and bioavailability is a tipping point to fully unravel the preventive effects of plant bioactives on cardiovascular diseases, metabolic syndrome, neurodegenerative disorders, and certain kinds of cancer. Other than correctly evaluating the bioaccessibility of the bioactive(s) from the plant matrix, there is a need of addressing how the colonic microbiota can impact on their chemical structure, as well as on the inter-individual differences in bioavailability and bioefficacy due to the diversity of microbiota composition. Moreover, future research should be focused on the understanding of dose/phytochemical intake–response relationship with pharmacokinetic studies, evaluating proper biomarkers of intake. The design of nutritionally matched control/test foodstuffs is also required to conduct well controlled intervention studies with both animals and human subjects. In vitro investigations using physiologically achievable concentrations of circulating metabolites with appropriate model test systems are also encouraged to give adequate mechanistic insights. On the other hand, foodomics technologies (metabolomics, nutrigenomics, and proteomics) should be used to assess the role of bioactive compounds from a comprehensive perspective. Finally, new communication channels and educational programs able to bring to the general public to the well-defined biological properties of plant-derived bioactive compounds should be implemented.

In conclusion, this Special Issue should review all aspects concerning the metabolism, bioavailability, and biological properties of plant bioactives and attempt to solve current critical gaps. Novel methodologies or out-of-the-box approaches could also complement current knowledge and assist in the study of plant bioactives.

Dr. Pedro Mena
Dr. Donato Angelino
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Dietary plant bioactives
  • Phenolic compounds
  • Carotenoids
  • Glucosinolates and sulfur compounds
  • Alkaloids
  • Colonic metabolism
  • Phase II metabolites
  • Gut microbiota
  • Bioavailability
  • Bioactivity
  • Human intervention trials

Published Papers (11 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Beneficial Effects of an Aged Black Garlic Extract in the Metabolic and Vascular Alterations Induced by a High Fat/Sucrose Diet in Male Rats
Nutrients 2019, 11(1), 153; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11010153
Received: 13 November 2018 / Revised: 29 December 2018 / Accepted: 8 January 2019 / Published: 12 January 2019
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Abstract
Aged black garlic (ABG) is a functional food with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Recent studies also report its beneficial metabolic effects in a context of obesity or diabetes, although the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. The aim of this work was to analyze
[...] Read more.
Aged black garlic (ABG) is a functional food with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Recent studies also report its beneficial metabolic effects in a context of obesity or diabetes, although the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. The aim of this work was to analyze the effects of an ABG extract in the vascular and metabolic alterations induced by a high-fat/sucrose diet in rats. For this purpose, male Sprague–Dawley rats were fed either a standard chow (controls; n = 12) or a high-fat/sucrose diet (HFD; n = 24) for 16 weeks. From week 8 on, half of the HFD rats were treated with a commercial ABG extract concentrated in S-allyl cysteine and melanoidins (ABG10+®; 250 mg/kg daily by gavage; 5 mL/kg). ABG10+®-treated rats showed lower mean caloric intake, body weight, triglycerides, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), insulin and leptin serum concentrations and higher high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) and adiponectin serum concentrations than non-treated rats. In the hypothalamus, ABG10+® treatment induced an increase in the gene expression of proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and a decrease in leptin receptor (ObR) mRNA levels. No significant changes were found in visceral adipose tissue except for an overexpression of β3-adrenergic receptor (β3-ADR) in ABG-treated rats. In subcutaneous adipose tissue, ABG10+® treatment decreased adipose weight and downregulated the gene expression of PPAR-γ, LPL, ObR and HSL. In brown adipose tissue, an overexpression of InsR, GLUT-4, UCP-1 and β3-ADR in ABG10+®-treated rats was found, whereas PPAR-γ mRNA levels were significantly decreased. Regarding vascular function, ABG10+® treatment attenuated the obesity-induced vasoconstriction in response to potassium chloride both in presence/absence of perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT). On the contrary, aorta segments from ABG-treated rats showed and improved relaxation in response to acetylcholine only when PVAT was present, with this fact possible being related to the decreased gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines in this tissue. In conclusion, ABG10+® administration partially improves the metabolic and vascular alterations induced by a high-fat/high-sucrose diet in rats through modifications in the gene expression of proteins and neuropeptides involved in inflammation, fat metabolism and food intake regulation. Further studies are required to assess the bioavailability of ABG between rats and humans. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Food, Nutrition and Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle Optimized Extraction by Response Surface Methodology Used for the Characterization and Quantification of Phenolic Compounds in Whole Red Grapes (Vitis vinifera)
Nutrients 2018, 10(12), 1931; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10121931
Received: 3 October 2018 / Revised: 17 November 2018 / Accepted: 3 December 2018 / Published: 5 December 2018
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Abstract
Scientific research has focused on the characterization of bioactive polyphenols from grape seeds and skins, and the pulp has often been overlooked. However, since the beneficial properties of grapes are associated with the consumption of whole fruit, a full extraction and posterior characterization
[...] Read more.
Scientific research has focused on the characterization of bioactive polyphenols from grape seeds and skins, and the pulp has often been overlooked. However, since the beneficial properties of grapes are associated with the consumption of whole fruit, a full extraction and posterior characterization of the phenolic compounds in whole grapes is required to identify the involved bioactive compounds. Such methodologies are not currently available for the whole edible parts of red grapes. This study aimed to determine the best polyphenol extraction conditions of whole red grapes, and apply the method to characterize and quantify the polyphenol composition of three different grapes. The optimized conditions were 80 mL/g, 65% methanol (1% formic acid), 72 °C, and 100 min under agitation of 500 rpm. Also, methanol and ethanol were compared as extraction solvents, and methanol achieved statistically higher extraction rates for anthocyanins. The results of this work suggest a higher quantification of phenolic compounds when red grapes are analyzed whole, including the seeds, pulp, and skin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Food, Nutrition and Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle The Effect of Sulforaphane on Glyoxalase I Expression and Activity in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells
Nutrients 2018, 10(11), 1773; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10111773
Received: 8 October 2018 / Revised: 5 November 2018 / Accepted: 10 November 2018 / Published: 15 November 2018
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Abstract
Studies demonstrate that the potential health-beneficial effect of sulforaphane (SR), a compound formed in broccoli, is the result of a number of mechanisms including upregulation of phase two detoxification enzymes. Recent studies suggest that SR increases expression/activity of glyoxalase 1 (Glo1), an enzyme
[...] Read more.
Studies demonstrate that the potential health-beneficial effect of sulforaphane (SR), a compound formed in broccoli, is the result of a number of mechanisms including upregulation of phase two detoxification enzymes. Recent studies suggest that SR increases expression/activity of glyoxalase 1 (Glo1), an enzyme involved in the degradation of methylglyoxal, is major precursor of advanced glycation end products. Those compounds are associated with diabetes complications and other age-related diseases. In this study, the effect of SR on the expression/activity of Glo1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 8 healthy volunteers was investigated. PBMCs were isolated and incubated with SR (2.5 μM-concentration achievable by consuming a broccoli portion) for 24 h and 48 h. Glo1 activity/expression, reduced glutathione (GSH), and glutathione-S-transferase gene expression were measured. Glo1 activity was not affected while after 48 h a slight but significant increase of its gene expression (1.03-fold) was observed. GSTP1 expression slightly increased after 24 h incubation (1.08-fold) while the expressions of isoform GSTT2 and GSTM2 were below the limit of detection. GSH sharply decreased, suggesting the formation of GSH-SR adducts that may have an impact SR availability. Those results suggest that a regular exposure to SR by broccoli consumption or SR supplements may enhance Glo1. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Food, Nutrition and Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle Are Raw Brassica Vegetables Healthier Than Cooked Ones? A Randomized, Controlled Crossover Intervention Trial on the Health-Promoting Potential of Ethiopian Kale
Nutrients 2018, 10(11), 1622; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10111622
Received: 21 September 2018 / Revised: 22 October 2018 / Accepted: 23 October 2018 / Published: 2 November 2018
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Abstract
The present human intervention trial investigated the health-promoting potential of B. carinata, with a focus on effects of thermal processing on bioactivity. Twenty-two healthy subjects consumed a B. carinata preparation from raw (allyl isothiocyanate-containing) or cooked (no allyl isothiocyanate) leaves for five days
[...] Read more.
The present human intervention trial investigated the health-promoting potential of B. carinata, with a focus on effects of thermal processing on bioactivity. Twenty-two healthy subjects consumed a B. carinata preparation from raw (allyl isothiocyanate-containing) or cooked (no allyl isothiocyanate) leaves for five days in a randomized crossover design. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were exposed to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), with or without metabolic activation using human S9 mix, and subsequently analyzed for DNA damage using the comet assay. Plasma was analyzed for total antioxidant capacity and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels. Cooked B. carinata significantly reduced DNA damage induced by AFB1 as compared to baseline levels (+S9 mix: 35%, −S9 mix: 33%, p ≤ 0.01, respectively). Raw B. carinata only reduced DNA damage by S9-activated AFB1 by 21% (p = 0.08). PGE2 plasma levels were significantly reduced in subjects after consuming raw B. carinata. No changes in plasma antioxidant capacity were detectable. A balanced diet, including raw and cooked Brassica vegetables, might be suited to fully exploit the health-promoting potential. These results also advocate the promotion of B. carinata cultivation in Eastern Africa as a measure to combat effects of unavoidable aflatoxin exposure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Food, Nutrition and Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle African Nightshade (Solanum scabrum Mill.): Impact of Cultivation and Plant Processing on Its Health Promoting Potential as Determined in a Human Liver Cell Model
Nutrients 2018, 10(10), 1532; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10101532
Received: 20 September 2018 / Revised: 8 October 2018 / Accepted: 10 October 2018 / Published: 17 October 2018
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Abstract
Plant cultivation and processing may impact nutrient and phytochemical content of vegetables. The present study aimed at determining the influence of cultivation and processing on the health promoting capacity of African nightshade (Solanum scabrum Mill.) leaves, an indigenous vegetable, rich in nutrients
[...] Read more.
Plant cultivation and processing may impact nutrient and phytochemical content of vegetables. The present study aimed at determining the influence of cultivation and processing on the health promoting capacity of African nightshade (Solanum scabrum Mill.) leaves, an indigenous vegetable, rich in nutrients and phytochemicals. Anti-genotoxicity against the human liver carcinogen aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) as determined by the comet assay and radical oxygen species (ROS) scavenging capacity of ethanolic and aqueous extracts were investigated in human derived liver (HepG2) cells. ROS scavenging activity was assessed using electron paramagnetic spin resonance and quantification of ARE/Nrf2 mediated gene expression. The cultivation was done under different environmental conditions. The processing included fermentation and cooking; postharvest ultraviolet irradiation (UV-C) treatment was also investigated. Overall, S. scabrum extracts showed strong health promoting potential, the highest potential was observed with the fermented extract, which showed a 60% reduction of AFB1 induced DNA damage and a 38% reduction in FeSO4 induced oxidative stress. The content of total polyphenols, carotenoids and chlorophylls was indeed affected by cultivation and processing. Based on the present in vitro findings consumption of S. scabrum leaves could be further encouraged, preferentially after cooking or fermentation of the plant. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Food, Nutrition and Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle Effect of Moringa oleifera Leaf Powder on Postprandial Blood Glucose Response: In Vivo Study on Saharawi People Living in Refugee Camps
Nutrients 2018, 10(10), 1494; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10101494
Received: 14 August 2018 / Revised: 5 October 2018 / Accepted: 9 October 2018 / Published: 12 October 2018
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Abstract
The hypoglycemic effect in humans of Moringa oleifera (MO) leaf powder has, to date, been poorly investigated. We assessed the chemical composition of MO leaf powder produced at Saharawi refugee camps, its in vitro ability to inhibit α-amylase activity, and its sensory acceptability
[...] Read more.
The hypoglycemic effect in humans of Moringa oleifera (MO) leaf powder has, to date, been poorly investigated. We assessed the chemical composition of MO leaf powder produced at Saharawi refugee camps, its in vitro ability to inhibit α-amylase activity, and its sensory acceptability in food. We then evaluated its effect on postprandial glucose response by randomly administering, on 2 different days, a traditional meal supplemented with 20 g of MO leaf powder (MOR20), or not (control meal, CNT), to 17 Saharawi diabetics and 10 healthy subjects. Capillary glycaemia was measured immediately before the meal and then at 30 min intervals for 3 h. In the diabetic subjects the postprandial glucose response peaked earlier with MOR20 compared to CNT and with lower increments at 90, 120, and 150 min. The mean glycemic meal response with MOR20 was lower than with CNT. The healthy subjects showed no differences. Thus, MO leaf powder could be a hypoglycemic herbal drug. However, given the poor taste acceptability of the 20 g MO meal, lower doses should be evaluated. Moreover, the hypoglycemic effects of MO leaf powder should also be demonstrated by trials evaluating its long-term effects on glycaemia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Food, Nutrition and Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle Nontoxic Glucomoringin-Isothiocyanate (GMG-ITC) Rich Soluble Extract Induces Apoptosis and Inhibits Proliferation of Human Prostate Adenocarcinoma Cells (PC-3)
Nutrients 2018, 10(9), 1174; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10091174
Received: 12 July 2018 / Revised: 14 August 2018 / Accepted: 17 August 2018 / Published: 27 August 2018
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Abstract
The incidence of prostate cancer malignancy along with other cancer types is increasing worldwide, resulting in high mortality rate due to lack of effective medications. Moringa oleifera has been used for the treatment of communicable and non-communicable ailments across tropical countries, yet, little
[...] Read more.
The incidence of prostate cancer malignancy along with other cancer types is increasing worldwide, resulting in high mortality rate due to lack of effective medications. Moringa oleifera has been used for the treatment of communicable and non-communicable ailments across tropical countries, yet, little has been documented regarding its effect on prostate cancer. We evaluated the acute toxicity and apoptosis inducing effect of glucomoringin-isothiocyanate rich soluble extracts (GMG-ITC-RSE) from M. oleifera in vivo and in vitro, respectively. Glucomoringin was isolated, identified, and characterized using fundamental analytical chemistry tools where Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, murine fibroblast (3T3), and human prostate adenocarcinoma cells (PC-3) were used for acute toxicity and bioassays experiments. GMG-ITC-RSE did not instigate adverse toxic reactions to the animals even at high doses (2000 mg/kg body weight) and affected none of the vital organs in the rats. The extract exhibited high levels of safety in 3T3 cells, where more than 90% of the cells appeared viable when treated with the extract in a time-dependent manner even at high dose (250 µg/mL). GMG-ITC-RSE significantly triggered morphological aberrations distinctive to apoptosis observed under microscope. These findings obviously revealed the putative safety of GMG-ITC-RSE in vivo and in vitro, in addition to its anti-proliferative effect on PC-3 cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Food, Nutrition and Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle Induction of Apoptosis and Cytotoxicity by Isothiocyanate Sulforaphene in Human Hepatocarcinoma HepG2 Cells
Nutrients 2018, 10(6), 718; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10060718
Received: 18 May 2018 / Revised: 31 May 2018 / Accepted: 1 June 2018 / Published: 4 June 2018
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Abstract
Glucoraphenin, a glucosinolate present in large quantities in radish is hydrolysed by myrosinase to form the isothiocyanate sulforaphene, which is believed to be responsible for its chemopreventive activity; however, the underlying mechanisms of action have not been investigated, particularly in human cell lines.
[...] Read more.
Glucoraphenin, a glucosinolate present in large quantities in radish is hydrolysed by myrosinase to form the isothiocyanate sulforaphene, which is believed to be responsible for its chemopreventive activity; however, the underlying mechanisms of action have not been investigated, particularly in human cell lines. The aim of the study is to assess the cytotoxicity of sulforaphene in HepG2 cells and evaluate its potential to enhance apoptosis. The cytotoxicity of sulforaphene in HepG2 cells was carried out ensuing an initial screening with two other cell lines, MFC-7 and HT-29, where sulforaphene displayed highest toxicity in HepG2 cells following incubation at 24, 48 and 72 h. In contrast, the intact glucosinolate showed no cytotoxicity. Morphological studies indicated that sulforaphene stimulated apoptosis as exemplified by cell shrinkage, blebbing, chromatin condensation, and nuclear fragmentation. The Annexin V assay revealed significant increases in apoptosis and the same treatment increased the activity of caspases -3/7 and -9, whereas a decline in caspase-8 was observed. Impairment of cell proliferation was indicated by cell cycle arrest at the Sub G0/G1 phase as compared to the other phases. It may be concluded that sulforaphene, but not its parent glucosinolate, glucoraphenin, causes cytotoxicity and stimulates apoptosis in HepG2 cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Food, Nutrition and Human Health)
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Review

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Green Tea Consumption and Risk of Breast Cancer and Recurrence—A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies
Nutrients 2018, 10(12), 1886; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10121886
Received: 10 November 2018 / Revised: 27 November 2018 / Accepted: 28 November 2018 / Published: 3 December 2018
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Abstract
Breast cancer (BC) is the most common cancer in women and several factors are involved in its onset. Green tea (GT) has been shown to have potential beneficial effects on different types of cancer. The aim of this review was to evaluate the
[...] Read more.
Breast cancer (BC) is the most common cancer in women and several factors are involved in its onset. Green tea (GT) has been shown to have potential beneficial effects on different types of cancer. The aim of this review was to evaluate the association between GT regular consumption and risk of BC in women. The risk of BC recurrence and risk of BC in relation to menopausal status were also evaluated. A literature search of PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science was conducted. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines were followed to perform the systematic review and meta-analysis. Full texts were downloaded for 40 studies; however, only 13 records were included in the meta-analysis. Eight were cohort studies and five were case-control studies. The pooled sample consisted of 163,810 people. An inverse statistically significant relationship between GT and BC risk, with an Odds Ratio (OR) = 0.85 ((95% CI = 0.80–0.92), p = 0.000)), was found. Egger’s linear regression test did not show a potential publication bias (intercept 0.33, t = 0.40, p = 0.695), which was also confirmed by the symmetry of the funnel plot. Moreover, no high statistical heterogeneity (Chi2 = 31.55, df = 13, I2 = 58.79%, p = 0.003) was found. The results of this meta-analysis showed a potential protective effect of GT consumption on BC, especially for BC recurrence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Food, Nutrition and Human Health)
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Open AccessReview Protective Effect of Glucosinolates Hydrolytic Products in Neurodegenerative Diseases (NDDs)
Nutrients 2018, 10(5), 580; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10050580
Received: 6 April 2018 / Revised: 27 April 2018 / Accepted: 1 May 2018 / Published: 8 May 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (3418 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Crucifer vegetables, Brassicaceae and other species of the order Brassicales, e.g., Moringaceae that are commonly consumed as spice and food, have been reported to have potential benefits for the treatment and prevention of several health disorders. Though epidemiologically inconclusive, investigations have shown that
[...] Read more.
Crucifer vegetables, Brassicaceae and other species of the order Brassicales, e.g., Moringaceae that are commonly consumed as spice and food, have been reported to have potential benefits for the treatment and prevention of several health disorders. Though epidemiologically inconclusive, investigations have shown that consumption of those vegetables may result in reducing and preventing the risks associated with neurodegenerative disease development and may also exert other biological protections in humans. The neuroprotective effects of these vegetables have been ascribed to their secondary metabolites, glucosinolates (GLs), and their related hydrolytic products, isothiocyanates (ITCs) that are largely investigated for their various medicinal effects. Extensive pre-clinical studies have revealed more than a few molecular mechanisms of action elucidating multiple biological effects of GLs hydrolytic products. This review summarizes the most significant and up-to-date in vitro and in vivo neuroprotective actions of sulforaphane (SFN), moringin (MG), phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), 6-(methylsulfinyl) hexyl isothiocyanate (6-MSITC) and erucin (ER) in neurodegenerative diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Food, Nutrition and Human Health)
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Open AccessReview Nutraceutical or Pharmacological Potential of Moringa oleifera Lam.
Nutrients 2018, 10(3), 343; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10030343
Received: 8 February 2018 / Revised: 3 March 2018 / Accepted: 7 March 2018 / Published: 12 March 2018
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (673 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Moringa oleifera Lam. (M. oleifera), which belongs to the Moringaceae family, is a perennial deciduous tropical tree, and native to the south of the Himalayan Mountains in northern India. M. oleifera is rich in proteins, vitamin A, minerals, essential amino acids,
[...] Read more.
Moringa oleifera Lam. (M. oleifera), which belongs to the Moringaceae family, is a perennial deciduous tropical tree, and native to the south of the Himalayan Mountains in northern India. M. oleifera is rich in proteins, vitamin A, minerals, essential amino acids, antioxidants, and flavonoids, as well as isothiocyanates. The extracts from M. oleifera exhibit multiple nutraceutical or pharmacological functions including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-cancer, hepatoprotective, neuroprotective, hypoglycemic, and blood lipid-reducing functions. The beneficial functions of M. oleifera are strongly associated with its phytochemicals such as flavonoids or isothiocyanates with bioactivity. In this review, we summarize the research progress related to the bioactivity and pharmacological mechanisms of M. oleifera in the prevention and treatment of a series of chronic diseases—including inflammatory diseases, neuro-dysfunctional diseases, diabetes, and cancers—which will provide a reference for its potential application in the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases or health promotion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Food, Nutrition and Human Health)
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