Special Issue "Advances of Parenteral Nutrition"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Lidia Santarpia
Website
Guest Editor
Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition Unit, Department of Internal Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University Hospital of Naples, Italy
Interests: Clinical nutrition; malnutrition; Artificial (Enteral and Parenteral) Nutrition indications;monitoring and complications; obesity; nutritional follow up after Bariatric Surgery; cachexia; sarcopenia; sarcopenic obesity; eating disorders; body composition

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Parenteral nutrition (PN), one of the main advances of modern medicine, offers a life-sustaining option in situations where impaired gastrointestinal function prevents adequate oral or enteral nutrition. PN is a lifesaving therapy for patients suffering from intestinal insufficiency and short bowel syndrome (SBS) who need this treatment throughout their lives.

The prescription and management of parenteral nutrition must be made only by experienced physicians according to well-defined indications to avoid possible serious adverse effects.

Several consensus recommendations have delineated appropriate PN use criteria, promoting clinical benefits and minimizing potential risks. Over the years, nutritional mixtures have been progressively improved in their composition, with the possibility of personalizing the nutritional support according to nutritional requirement, and type of disease, choosing the best macronutrient combinations (e.g., omega-3 lipid emulsions, glutamine, branched chain amino acids, etc.). Moreover, the possibility of studying body composition allows a better follow-up of patients’ improvement.

On the other hand, little is known about the benefits of parenteral support in patients with incurable diseases. We would be honored to receive your valuable contribution with a manuscript that fits the objectives and topics of this Special Issue on “Advances of Parenteral Nutrition”.

Prof. Dr. Lidia Santarpia
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • protein
  • carbohydrates
  • fatty acids
  • refeeding syndrome
  • metabolic complications
  • central venous catheter infections
  • intestinal failure
  • micronutrients
  • acid–base balance
  • ethics
  • hemodynamic

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
Cardiac Changes in Patients on Long-Term Parenteral Nutrition
Nutrients 2019, 11(7), 1587; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11071587 - 13 Jul 2019
Abstract
Patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS) on long-term home parenteral nutrition (HPN) chronically receive high fluid volumes directly into the right atrium (RA) through the superior vena cava. We retrospectively evaluated cardiac function measured by routine transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) in a population of [...] Read more.
Patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS) on long-term home parenteral nutrition (HPN) chronically receive high fluid volumes directly into the right atrium (RA) through the superior vena cava. We retrospectively evaluated cardiac function measured by routine transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) in a population of 26 SBS patients on long-term HPN and compared their data on echocardiograph-derived right heart structure and function, with those of a control group of 26 patients also bearing a central venous catheter (CVC) for other reasons. Results showed that body weight and BMI were significantly higher in the control group. The echocardiographic estimate of RA pressure was higher in HPN patients than in controls (p = 0.01). An increased estimate of RA pressure indicates the need to consider TTE in the follow-up of long-term HPN patients to detect functional impairment early. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances of Parenteral Nutrition)
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Review

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Antimicrobial Locks in Patients Receiving Home Parenteral Nutrition
Nutrients 2020, 12(2), 439; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020439 - 10 Feb 2020
Abstract
Catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is one of the most common and potentially fatal complications in patients receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN). In order to prevent permanent venous access loss, catheter locking with an antimicrobial solution has received significant interest and is often a [...] Read more.
Catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is one of the most common and potentially fatal complications in patients receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN). In order to prevent permanent venous access loss, catheter locking with an antimicrobial solution has received significant interest and is often a favored approach as part of the treatment of CRBSI, but mainly for its prevention. Several agents have been used for treating and preventing CRBSI, for instance antibiotics, antiseptics (ethanol, taurolidine) and, historically, anticoagulants such as heparin. Nonetheless, current guidelines do not provide clear guidance on the use of catheter locks. Therefore, this review aims to provide a better understanding of the current use of antimicrobial locking in patients on HPN as well as reviewing the available data on novel compounds. Despite the fact that our current knowledge on catheter locking is still hampered by several gaps, taurolidine and ethanol solutions seem promising for prevention and potentially, but not proven, treatment of CRBSI. Additional studies are warranted to further characterize the efficacy and safety of these agents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances of Parenteral Nutrition)
Open AccessReview
Infectious Complications in Home Parenteral Nutrition: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Comparing Peripherally-Inserted Central Catheters with Other Central Catheters
Nutrients 2019, 11(9), 2083; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092083 - 04 Sep 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Background: Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) has become a common therapy. There is still controversy regarding the possibility that peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) may diminish catheter-related blood stream infection (CRBSI) rates. Methods: We searched the PubMed database for studies reporting the rates of [...] Read more.
Background: Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) has become a common therapy. There is still controversy regarding the possibility that peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) may diminish catheter-related blood stream infection (CRBSI) rates. Methods: We searched the PubMed database for studies reporting the rates of CRBSI with HPN. Study selection was performed independently by three investigators. Disagreements were discussed and resolved by consensus or by arbitration by an author not involved in the search. The National Institutes of Health Quality Assessment Tools was used to assess the methodological quality of the studies. Meta-analyses were performed using MetaXL 5.3 with the quality effects model. Results: Screening of the article titles and abstracts yielded 134 full text articles for evaluation. Only three prospective studies that included appropriate data were considered for the final analysis. The relative risk of the CRBSI rate was 0.41 (0.14–1.17) for PICC vs. tunneled catheters. The relative risk of the CRBSI rate was 0.16 (0.04–0.64) for PICC vs. ports. The relative risk of the thrombosis rate was 3.16 (0.20–49.67) for PICCs vs. tunneled. Conclusions: There is insufficient evidence to show a difference in CRBSI rates between PICCs and tunneled catheters. On the other hand, PICCs showed lower CRBSI rates than ports. There was also no difference in the rate of catheter-related thrombosis and mechanical complications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances of Parenteral Nutrition)
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