Special Issue "Nutrient Fortification for Human Health"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Mary L'Abbé Website E-Mail
Univ Toronto, Dept Nutr Sci, Fac Med, Toronto, ON, Canada
Interests: food and nutrition policy; population health; health claims on foods; marketing to children and parents; menu labelling; nutrition composition and food reformulation
Guest Editor
Dr. Anthea Christoforou Website E-Mail
Univ Toronto, Dept Nutr Sci, Fac Med, Toronto, ON, Canada
Interests: food and nutrition policy; diet-related disease; population health nutrition; nutrition labelling

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We invite you to contribute to a Special Issue of Nutrients, entitled “Nutrient Fortification for Human Health”.

It has been well-documented that food fortification programs have been highly effective in managing the micronutrient deficiency diseases of the past. Although many such national programs are still ongoing, the overall coverage of some micronutrients, particularly amongst certain vulnerable populations and in resource constrained, low- and middle-income countries, remain low. Additionally, shifting dietary patterns, updated science with respect to intake requirements and expanded opportunities for discretionary or manufacturer-driven fortification present new challenges in industrialized contexts from which the historical successes of fortification were observed.

This Special Issues aims to compile recent research exploring the role of fortification in optimizing nutrient exposures in order to improve diet and health outcomes at the population level. While a broad range of topics are welcomed for consideration, priority will be given to studies with a specific focus on food fortification policy, the population health impact of existing/proposed fortification programs, bioavailability, market-driven (discretionary) fortification, consumer understanding and awareness of fortified foods, labelling of fortified foods, novel food vehicles and biofortification.

Contributions may take the form of original articles or reviews of the literature, systematic reviews and meta-analyses.

We look forward to hearing from you soon.

Sincerely,

Prof. Mary L'Abbé
Dr. Anthea Christoforou
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Food fortification
  • Food fortification policy
  • Market-driven fortification
  • Voluntary fortification
  • Biofortification
  • Food labelling

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Consumer Perceptions and Acceptability of Traditional Dishes Prepared with Provitamin A-Biofortified Maize and Sweet Potato
Nutrients 2019, 11(7), 1577; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11071577 - 12 Jul 2019
Abstract
Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) is prevalent in South Africa, particularly among predominantly poor rural communities. Provitamin A (PVA)-biofortified crops could be used to address VAD; however, there are challenges of poor consumer acceptability. This study investigated the effect of replacing white maize and [...] Read more.
Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) is prevalent in South Africa, particularly among predominantly poor rural communities. Provitamin A (PVA)-biofortified crops could be used to address VAD; however, there are challenges of poor consumer acceptability. This study investigated the effect of replacing white maize and cream-fleshed sweet potato (CFSP) with PVA-biofortified maize and orange-fleshed sweet potato (OFSP), respectively, on consumer acceptability and perceptions of traditional dishes of rural communities in South Africa. Consumer acceptability of PVA-biofortified phutu (a crumbly maize porridge) served with either curried cabbage, chicken or bambara groundnut, separately, and boiled OFSP was evaluated by black South African adults (n = 120) using a five-point facial hedonic scale. Focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted with 56 subjects recruited from the consumer panel to assess consumer perceptions of the food samples. The majority of the participants rated the composite dishes containing PVA-biofortified phutu as “4 = good” and the acceptability of the composite dishes varied significantly (p < 0.05). Compared to other age groups, the 50–59-year age group showed higher preference for white phutu and chicken curry, whereas the 30–39-year age group showed higher preference for PVA-biofortified phutu and chicken curry. The acceptability of OFSP and CFSP was similar. The study participants showed positive perceptions of the OFSP, as well as PVA-biofortified phutu if served with either curried chicken or cabbage. The findings suggest that PVA-biofortified maize and OFSP can replace white maize and CFSP, respectively, in selected traditional dishes of the rural communities studied to alleviate VAD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrient Fortification for Human Health)
Open AccessArticle
Nutritional Properties and Consumer’s Acceptance of Provitamin A-Biofortified Amahewu Combined with Bambara (Vigna Subterranea) Flour
Nutrients 2019, 11(7), 1476; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11071476 - 28 Jun 2019
Abstract
Amahewu is a fermented non-alcoholic cereal grain beverage, popular in Southern Africa. This study evaluates the possibility of producing an acceptable provitamin A (PVA)-biofortified maize amahewu, complemented with bambara flour, to contribute towards the alleviation of protein energy malnutrition (PEM) and vitamin A [...] Read more.
Amahewu is a fermented non-alcoholic cereal grain beverage, popular in Southern Africa. This study evaluates the possibility of producing an acceptable provitamin A (PVA)-biofortified maize amahewu, complemented with bambara flour, to contribute towards the alleviation of protein energy malnutrition (PEM) and vitamin A deficiency (VAD). Germinated, roasted, and raw bambara flours, were added at 30% (w/w) substitution level, separately, to either white maize or PVA-biofortified maize flour, and processed into amahewu. Wheat bran (5% w/w) was used as reference inoculum. Amahewu samples were analyzed for nutritional properties and acceptability. The protein and lysine contents of amahewu almost doubled with the inclusion of germinated bambara. Protein digestibility of amahewu samples increased by almost 45% with the inclusion of bambara. PVA-biofortified maize amahewu samples complemented with bambara were extremely liked for their color, aroma, and taste when compared with their white maize counterparts. The principal component analysis explained 96% of the variation and PVA-biofortified maize amahewu samples were differentiated from white maize amahewu samples. The taste of amahewu resulting from roasting and germination of bambara was preferred in PVA-biofortified maize amahewu, compared to white maize amahewu. We conclude that PVA-biofortified maize amahewu, complemented with germinated bambara, has the potential to contribute towards the alleviation of PEM and VAD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrient Fortification for Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Improving the Dietary Vitamin A Content of Rural Communities in South Africa by Replacing Non-Biofortified White Maize and Sweet Potato with Biofortified Maize and Sweet Potato in Traditional Dishes
Nutrients 2019, 11(6), 1198; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061198 - 28 May 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Biofortification of staple crops has a potential for addressing micronutrient deficiencies, such as vitamin A deficiency (VAD), which are prevalent in South Africa. The poor acceptability of provitamin A (PVA)-biofortified foods could be improved by combining them with other food items to produce [...] Read more.
Biofortification of staple crops has a potential for addressing micronutrient deficiencies, such as vitamin A deficiency (VAD), which are prevalent in South Africa. The poor acceptability of provitamin A (PVA)-biofortified foods could be improved by combining them with other food items to produce modified traditional dishes. The nutritional composition of the dishes could also be improved by the modification. The study aimed to investigate the effect of replacing white maize and cream-fleshed sweet potato (CFSP)] with PVA-biofortified maize and orange-fleshed sweet potato (OFSP) on the nutritional composition of South African traditional dishes. The protein, fibre, total mineral (ash), lysine, and iron concentrations of the PVA maize phutu (traditional porridge) composite dishes (control), were not significantly different (P > 0.05) from those of white maize phutu composite dishes. However, the PVA concentration of PVA maize phutu composite dishes was higher than that of the white phutu composite dishes (P > 0.05). The OFSP had a significantly lower protein concentration, but a significantly higher (P > 0.05) fibre, ash, lysine, isoleucine, leucine, and PVA concentration, relative to the CFSP. The findings indicate that composite dishes in which white maize is replaced with PVA-biofortified maize, and switching over from CFSP to OFSP, would contribute to combating VAD in South Africa, and in other developing counties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrient Fortification for Human Health)
Open AccessArticle
Inclusion of Sunflower Oil in the Bovine Diet Improves Milk Nutritional Profile
Nutrients 2019, 11(2), 481; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11020481 - 25 Feb 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Milk and its derivatives are important foods that contribute to daily nutrient requirements and improve consumers’ health. This study evaluated the effects of supplementing the diet of lactating dairy cows with sunflower oil (SFO), selenium, and vitamin E on the milk’s fatty acid [...] Read more.
Milk and its derivatives are important foods that contribute to daily nutrient requirements and improve consumers’ health. This study evaluated the effects of supplementing the diet of lactating dairy cows with sunflower oil (SFO), selenium, and vitamin E on the milk’s fatty acid profile and fat oxidative stability as well as the acceptability of the milk by consumers. For this purpose, 32 Jersey dairy cows were allocated to four treatment groups for 60 days, as follows: C (control diet); A (3.5 mg/kg DM (dry matter) organic selenium + 2000 IU vitamin E/cow per day); O (4% SFO DM); OA (equal doses of A and O treatments). The inclusion of SFO decreased the contents of 10:0, 10:1, 11:0, 12:0, 12:1, 14:0, and 9c-14:1 fatty acids as well as odd- and branched-chain fatty acids (13:0, iso 13:0, anteiso 13:0, 15:0, iso 15:0, and 17:0). There was also a tendency for 8:0 and 16:0 fatty acid concentrations to decrease when SFO was included in the cows´ diet. SFO decreased the concentration of 10:0 to 15:0 fatty acids in milk. The sum of the conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs), conjugated alpha-linolenic acid intermediates (CLnAs; 18:3 ω6 + 18:3 ω3), and 22:0 fatty acids in milk tended to increase, and there were significant increases in 18:0 and 9c11t-18:2 with SFO. In terms of the effects of SFO on the health-related lipid indices, the atherogenicity index tended to decrease and h/H tended to increase. When cows were supplemented with antioxidants, the concentration of 20:2 fatty acids decreased, the 6 + 7 + 8 + 9t-18:1, 16t-18:1, 20:0, 22:2, and 24:0 fatty acid concentrations increased, and there was a trend for the 22:1 ω9 fatty acid concentration to increase with antioxidants plus oil. There was a tendency for ω6 fatty acids and ω6/ω3 to increase with milk treated with antioxidants plus oil. The oxidative stability of milk was not influenced by the presence of SFO or antioxidants in the diet of dairy cows. Consumers desired the color and mouthfeel of the milk that was treated with SFO. Cows fed with 4% sunflower oil produced milk with an improved fatty acid profile for human nutrition, containing a higher CLA content and an improved ratio of hypocholesterolemic and hypercholesterolemic fatty acids, without increasing the milk’s susceptibility to oxidation. The milk was also rated as being more acceptable by consumers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrient Fortification for Human Health)
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Open AccessArticle
Comparison Study of Iron Bioaccessibility from Dietary Supplements and Microencapsulated Preparations
Nutrients 2019, 11(2), 273; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11020273 - 26 Jan 2019
Abstract
Iron deficiency is the most common form of malnutrition. Factors responsible for this so-called “hidden hunger” include poor diet, increased micronutrient needs and health problems such as diseases and infections. Body iron status can be increased by the intake of dietary supplements and [...] Read more.
Iron deficiency is the most common form of malnutrition. Factors responsible for this so-called “hidden hunger” include poor diet, increased micronutrient needs and health problems such as diseases and infections. Body iron status can be increased by the intake of dietary supplements and fortified food. The aim of the present study was to compare iron bioaccessibility from commercial nutritional supplements and iron microcapsules. A comparison study was performed under conditions mimicking gastric and gastrointestinal digestion. A preparation of encapsulated ferrous sulphate or lactate and vitamin C, in a formula, showed bioaccessibility factors of up to 100% when digested individually, and around 60% in the presence of a food matrix. The degree of oxidation of the ferrous ions differed, depending on the type of preparation, the presence of vitamin C and the food matrix. The highest percentage content of ferrous ion, in the soluble fractions after gastrointestinal digestion, was shown by the preparation containing microencapsulated ferrous lactate or ferrous sulphate and vitamin C. Encapsulation seems to limit the interaction of iron with the food matrix and protect it against oxidation, thus making it more accessible for intestinal uptake. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrient Fortification for Human Health)
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