Special Issue "Macronutrients and Human Health"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Macronutrients and Human Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Bernard Venn
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Department of Human Nutrition, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand
Interests: clinical trials; carbohydrate; sugar; fructose; fibre; B vitamins
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Nutrients was launched in 2009 and has published over 10,000 papers since. With an impact factor of 4.546, Nutrients ranks as a Q1 journal and has become an excellent open source platform to ensure rapid and widespread exposure of your research findings and perspectives. 

As the Section Editor of the newly established Macronutrients and Human Health Section, I personally invite you to submit a review paper in your specific area of expertise. This Special Issue aims to  publish quality manuscripts related to macronutrients and human health. The field broadly covers topics such as epidemiology, dietary interventions, basic science, natural history, genetics, and reviews. Topics covered will include all aspects of carbohydrates, dietary fatty acids, and proteins from animal and vegetable sources.

Dr. Bernard Venn
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Dietary carbohydrates
  • Fats
  • Proteins
  • Dietary fat
  • Carbohydrates
  • Amino acids
  • Fatty acids

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Macronutrients and Human Health for the 21st Century
Nutrients 2020, 12(8), 2363; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12082363 - 07 Aug 2020
Abstract
Fat, protein and carbohydrate are essential macronutrients. Various organisations have made recommendations as to the energy contribution that each of these components makes to our overall diet. The extent of food refining and the ability of food systems to support future populations may [...] Read more.
Fat, protein and carbohydrate are essential macronutrients. Various organisations have made recommendations as to the energy contribution that each of these components makes to our overall diet. The extent of food refining and the ability of food systems to support future populations may also impact on how macronutrients contribute to our diet. In this Special Issue, we are calling for manuscripts from all disciplines to provide a broad-ranging discussion on macronutrients and health from personal, public and planetary perspectives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Macronutrients and Human Health)

Research

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Open AccessArticle
The Association of Serum Levels of Leptin and Ghrelin with the Dietary Fat Content in Non-Obese Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Nutrients 2020, 12(9), 2753; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12092753 - 10 Sep 2020
Abstract
Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are at an increased risk of developing insulin resistance and abdominal obesity in the state of an improper diet balance. Leptin is a peptide considered to be a satiety hormone that plays an important role in the [...] Read more.
Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are at an increased risk of developing insulin resistance and abdominal obesity in the state of an improper diet balance. Leptin is a peptide considered to be a satiety hormone that plays an important role in the long-term energy balance, whereas ghrelin is a hormone that controls short-term appetite regulation and is considered a hunger hormone. The aim of the present study was to assess the relationship between serum leptin and ghrelin concentrations and the dietary macronutrient content in PCOS women. We examined 73 subjects: 39 women diagnosed with PCOS by the Rotterdam criteria and 34 healthy controls, matched by the body mass index. The subjects completed a consecutive three-day dietary diary to identify the macronutrient and micronutrient intake. Serum concentrations of leptin and total ghrelin were measured and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated. The studied groups did not differ significantly in terms of the intake of macronutrients (proteins, fats, and carbohydrates) and serum concentrations of ghrelin and leptin (all p > 0.05). In the PCOS group, the serum leptin concentration positively correlated with the intake of total fat (r = 0.36, p = 0.02), total cholesterol (r = −0.36, p = 0.02), saturated fatty acids (r = 0.43, p < 0.01), and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) (r = 0.37, p = 0.02), whereas the serum ghrelin concentration correlated in an inverse manner with the intake of total fat (r = −0.37, p = 0.02), MUFA (r = −0.37, p = 0.02), polyunsaturated fatty acids (r = −0.34, p = 0.03), and long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (r = −0.38, p = 0.02). In this group, we also found a negative association of HOMA-IR with serum ghrelin levels (r = −0.4, p = 0.03) and a positive relationship with the serum leptin concentration (r = 0.5, p < 0.01) and relationships between HOMA-IR and total dietary fat (r = 0.38, p = 0.03) and MUFA (r = 0.35, p = 0.04) intake. In PCOS women, dietary components such as the total fat and type of dietary fat and HOMA-IR are positively connected to serum leptin concentrations and negatively connected to serum ghrelin concentrations, which may influence the energy balance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Macronutrients and Human Health)
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