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Dietary Supplements in Gastrointestinal Disorders

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (5 December 2023) | Viewed by 4280

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Medicinal Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, University of Florida, 1345 Center Drive, Room P3-20, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
Interests: dietary supplements; natural products with CNS activity; drug–nutrient interactions; drug–supplement interactions; gastrointestinal disorders
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Guest Editor
Biobehavioral Nursing Science, College of Nursing, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
Interests: interventions with use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) modalities to improve nutritional status; cancer-cachexia and symptom management in adult patients with gastrointestinal cancers; herbal supplement use to manage symptoms and health promotion in older adults; palliative care related to cancer-cachexia in patients with GI cancers

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The use of dietary supplements in the treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) disorders is widespread and well-established. In many cases, patients may self-treat mild-to-moderate GI disorders with a supplement either in a traditional manner or as an over-the-counter commercial supplement. While such use may benefit patients, it is often without a formal diagnosis or evaluation of the underlying GI disorder by a healthcare provider, potentially disguising underlying serious pathologies and leading to drug interactions with prescribed or over-the-counter medicines. The wide range of traditional medicines as well as commercial supplements available to consumers and patients often have very limited research associated with their indicated uses and benefits, or regarding potential limitations and drug interactions. Given the high use rate of such supplements for GI disorders, we are seeking contributions to further our understanding of supplement use for either specific GI disorders or scientific summaries of supplements used for various GI disorders.

We are soliciting original papers, review articles, as well as case reports.

Prof. Dr. Oliver Grundmann
Dr. Saunjoo L. Yoon
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • gastrointestinal disorders
  • dietary supplements
  • traditional medicines
  • chronic inflammatory gastrointestinal disorders
  • gut health

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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19 pages, 3501 KiB  
Article
Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Chestnut Honey and Cabbage Mixtures Alleviates Gastric Mucosal Damage
by Hyo-Jung Kim, Bo-Ram Jin, Chang-Dae Lee, Doyun Kim, Ah Young Lee, Sanghyun Lee and Hyo-Jin An
Nutrients 2024, 16(3), 389; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16030389 - 29 Jan 2024
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Abstract
Gastritis, one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders, damages the stomach lining as it causes a disproportion between the protective and ruinous factors of the gastric system. Cabbage (CB) is widely used to treat gastric lesions but requires the addition of natural sweeteners [...] Read more.
Gastritis, one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders, damages the stomach lining as it causes a disproportion between the protective and ruinous factors of the gastric system. Cabbage (CB) is widely used to treat gastric lesions but requires the addition of natural sweeteners to counteract its distinct bitter taste. Therefore, this study sought to determine whether the combination of chestnut honey (CH)—which is known for its dark brown color and high kynurenic acid (KA) content—or KA-increased CH (KACH) with CB (CH + CB or KACH + CB) exerts synergistic effects for improving both taste and efficacy. Before confirming the gastroprotective effects in indomethacin (INDO)-induced rats, the anti-inflammatory activities of CH + CB and KACH + CB were assessed in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. As a result, treatment with either CH + CB or KACH + CB downregulated pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages by regulating the translocation of nuclear factor kappa B. Furthermore, both CH + CB and KACH + CB not only enhanced the levels of antioxidant enzymes but also triggered the activation of nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2. Based on these effects, CH + CB or KACH + CB effectively protected the gastric mucosa in INDO-induced rats. Therefore, this study suggests that CH + CB and KACH + CB exert stronger gastroprotective effects when used together. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Supplements in Gastrointestinal Disorders)
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Review

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15 pages, 699 KiB  
Review
Relevance of Dietary Supplement Use in Gastrointestinal-Cancer-Associated Cachexia
by Saunjoo L. Yoon and Oliver Grundmann
Nutrients 2023, 15(15), 3391; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15153391 - 30 Jul 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2251
Abstract
Cancer cachexia is a multi-organ syndrome with unintentional weight loss, sarcopenia, and systemic inflammation. Gastrointestinal (GI) cancer patients are more susceptible to cachexia development due to impaired nutrient absorption and digestion. Given the widespread availability and relatively low cost of dietary supplements, we [...] Read more.
Cancer cachexia is a multi-organ syndrome with unintentional weight loss, sarcopenia, and systemic inflammation. Gastrointestinal (GI) cancer patients are more susceptible to cachexia development due to impaired nutrient absorption and digestion. Given the widespread availability and relatively low cost of dietary supplements, we examined the evidence and effects of fish oil (omega-3 fatty acids), melatonin, probiotics, and green tea for managing symptoms of GI cancer cachexia. A literature review of four specific supplements was conducted using PubMed, Google Scholar, and CINAHL without a date restriction. Of 4621 available literature references, 26 articles were eligible for review. Fish oil decreased C-reactive protein and maintained CD4+ cell count, while melatonin indicated inconsistent findings on managing cachexia, but was well-tolerated. Probiotics decreased serum pro-inflammatory biomarkers and increased the tolerability of chemotherapy by reducing side effects. Green tea preparations and extracts showed a decreased risk of developing various cancers and did not impact tumor growth, survival, or adverse effects. Among these four supplements, probiotics are most promising for further research in preventing systemic inflammation and maintaining adequate absorption of nutrients to prevent the progression of cancer cachexia. Supplements may benefit treatment outcomes in cancer cachexia without side effects while supporting nutritional and therapeutic needs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Supplements in Gastrointestinal Disorders)
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