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Updates in the Nutrition Therapy and Therapeutic Approach of Celiac Disease

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (5 June 2024) | Viewed by 6031

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Faculty of Medicine, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 700115 Iasi, Romania
2. Institute of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, “Sf. Spiridon” County Clinical Emergency Hospital, 700111 Iasi, Romania
Interests: celiac disease; functional gastrointestinal disorders; inflammatory bowel disease; gut microbiota; micronutrient deficiency; oxidative stress
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Co-Guest Editor
Department of Diabetes, Nutrition and Metabolic Diseases, “Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 700115 Iasi, Romania
Interests: diabetes; metabolic diseases; cardiology; diabetic kidney disease
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated systemic disorder of the gastrointestinal tract triggered by exposure to dietary gluten and similar alcohol-soluble proteins (prolamins) in genetically susceptible individuals.

Gluten-free diet (GFD) is the cornerstone therapy of CD. Although GFD has proven to be safe and effective in most celiac patients, there are limitations that justify the need to implement further therapeutic strategies.

Alternative therapeutic approaches have been proposed to decrease immunogenicity and to prevent the absorption of gluten-containing grains, together with strategies to limit T-cell migration or restore mucosal homeostasis.

We hope that researchers from various specialties (pediatrics, gastroenterology, allergology, immunology, etc.) will find in this Special Issue the appropriate framework to disseminate their results and knowledge and a resource for further research.

As Guest Editors of the Special Issue, we invite you to submit both original research papers and review articles related to this topic.

Dr. Gabriela Stefanescu
Prof. Dr. Bogdan-Mircea Mihai
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • gluten-free diet
  • dietary adherence
  • non-dietary therapies
  • gut microbiota
  • micronutrient deficiency
  • adjuvant therapies
  • gluten detoxification
  • gluten proteolysis
  • probiotics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

19 pages, 514 KiB  
Review
Connection between Celiac Disease and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Children—A Development Model of Autoimmune Diseases Starting from What We Inherit to What We Eat
by Vasile Valeriu Lupu, Elena Jechel, Cristina Maria Mihai, Elena Cristina Mitrofan, Ancuta Lupu, Iuliana Magdalena Starcea, Silvia Fotea, Adriana Mocanu, Dragos Catalin Ghica, Costica Mitrofan, Dragos Munteanu, Delia Lidia Salaru, Ionela Daniela Morariu and Ileana Ioniuc
Nutrients 2023, 15(11), 2535; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15112535 - 29 May 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2708
Abstract
Celiac disease (CD) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are two diseases intensively studied in all age groups, with an increasing incidence at the global level, possibly due to the increased awareness of the diseases and their accurate diagnosis and as a consequence of [...] Read more.
Celiac disease (CD) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are two diseases intensively studied in all age groups, with an increasing incidence at the global level, possibly due to the increased awareness of the diseases and their accurate diagnosis and as a consequence of the new research and innovation technologies that have appeared in medicine. The first is a controllable condition found in approximately 1% of the entire population in the form of a reaction to environmental stimuli affecting individuals with genetic susceptibility, causing gluten intolerance, gastrointestinal and extradigestive symptoms, starting from subclinical stages and culminating in severe malabsorption. On the other hand, lupus is an autoimmune disease with chameleon-like symptoms and found mainly in the female sex, which leaves its clinical mark on most organs, from the skin, eyes, and kidneys to the cardiovascular, pulmonary, neurological, osteoarticular, and hematological systems. Current studies focus on the correlation between celiac disease and other autoimmune pathologies such as autoimmune thyroiditis (Hashimoto and Graves–Basedow), type I diabetes, and systemic lupus erythematosus. The current review aims to present a summary of the data from the specialized literature regarding the intercurrents between celiac disease and lupus by analyzing the most recent studies published on PubMed. Full article
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15 pages, 1053 KiB  
Review
Advances in Understanding the Human Gut Microbiota and Its Implication in Pediatric Celiac Disease—A Narrative Review
by Vasile Valeriu Lupu, Laura Mihaela Trandafir, Anca Adam Raileanu, Cristina Maria Mihai, Ionela Daniela Morariu, Iuliana Magdalena Starcea, Adriana Mocanu, Lacramioara Ionela Butnariu, Gabriela Stoleriu, Delia Lidia Salaru, Tatiana Chisnoiu, Dragos Munteanu, Costica Mitrofan and Ancuta Lupu
Nutrients 2023, 15(11), 2499; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15112499 - 27 May 2023
Cited by 21 | Viewed by 2770
Abstract
Celiac disease (CD) is a multifactorial disorder, defined by a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors. Both genetic predisposition and dietary exposure to gluten are essential factors in triggering CD. However, there is proof that their presence is necessary, but not sufficient, [...] Read more.
Celiac disease (CD) is a multifactorial disorder, defined by a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors. Both genetic predisposition and dietary exposure to gluten are essential factors in triggering CD. However, there is proof that their presence is necessary, but not sufficient, for disease development. Through gut microbiota modulation, several additional environmental factors have shown their potential role as co-factors in CD pathogenesis. The aim of this review is to illustrate the possible mechanisms that stand behind the gut microbiota’s involvement in CD pathogenesis. Furthermore, we discuss microbiota manipulation’s potential role as both a preventative and therapeutic option. The available literature provides evidence that even before CD onset, factors including cesarean birth and formula feeding, as well as intestinal infection exposure, amplify the risk of CD in genetically predisposed individuals, due to their influence on the intestinal microbiome composition. Active CD was associated with elevated levels of several Gram-negative bacterial genera, including Bacteroides, Escherichia, and Prevotella, while beneficial bacteria such as lactobacilli and bifidobacteria were less abundant. Viral and fungal dysbiosis has also been described in CD, evidencing specific taxa alteration. A gluten-free diet (GFD) may improve the clinical symptoms and duodenal histopathology, but the persistence of intestinal dysbiosis in CD children under a GFD urges the need for additional therapy. Probiotics, prebiotics, and fecal microbial transplant have demonstrated their efficacy in restoring gut microbiota eubiosis in adult CD patients; however, their efficacy and safety as adjunctive therapies to a GFD in pediatric patients needs further investigation. Full article
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