Special Issue "Diet and Exercise in Type 1 Diabetes"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Sports Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 November 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Michael C. Riddell
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Kinesiology and Health Science, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, Ontario, M4G 2X1, Canada
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Good nutrition, combined with a physically active lifestyle, plays a central role in the management of type 1 diabetes at all ages. This Special Issue of Nutrients, entitled “Diet and Exercise in Type 1 Diabetes”, welcomes the submission of manuscripts either describing original research or high quality systematic reviews and meta-analyses focusing on the role of nutrition on type 1 diabetes management and control. Manuscripts should cover the effects of nutrients, foods, and/or dietary patterns in relation to people living with type 1 diabetes. We also encourage submissions on nutrition and dietary strategies for exercise management and performance in type 1 diabetes.

Prof. Michael C. Riddell
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview
Carbohydrate Intake in the Context of Exercise in People with Type 1 Diabetes
Nutrients 2019, 11(12), 3017; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11123017 - 10 Dec 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3501
Abstract
Although the benefits of regular exercise on cardiovascular risk factors are well established for people with type 1 diabetes (T1D), glycemic control remains a challenge during exercise. Carbohydrate consumption to fuel the exercise bout and/or for hypoglycemia prevention is an important cornerstone to [...] Read more.
Although the benefits of regular exercise on cardiovascular risk factors are well established for people with type 1 diabetes (T1D), glycemic control remains a challenge during exercise. Carbohydrate consumption to fuel the exercise bout and/or for hypoglycemia prevention is an important cornerstone to maintain performance and avoid hypoglycemia. The main strategies pertinent to carbohydrate supplementation in the context of exercise cover three aspects: the amount of carbohydrates ingested (i.e., quantity in relation to demands to fuel exercise and avoid hypoglycemia), the timing of the intake (before, during and after the exercise, as well as circadian factors), and the quality of the carbohydrates (encompassing differing carbohydrate types, as well as the context within a meal and the associated macronutrients). The aim of this review is to comprehensively summarize the literature on carbohydrate intake in the context of exercise in people with T1D. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet and Exercise in Type 1 Diabetes)
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Open AccessReview
Supplementary Nitric Oxide Donors and Exercise as Potential Means to Improve Vascular Health in People with Type 1 Diabetes: Yes to NO?
Nutrients 2019, 11(7), 1571; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11071571 - 12 Jul 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1830
Abstract
Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is associated with a greater occurrence of cardiovascular pathologies. Vascular dysfunction has been shown at the level of the endothelial layers and failure to maintain a continuous pool of circulating nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated in the progression [...] Read more.
Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is associated with a greater occurrence of cardiovascular pathologies. Vascular dysfunction has been shown at the level of the endothelial layers and failure to maintain a continuous pool of circulating nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated in the progression of poor vascular health. Biochemically, NO can be produced via two distinct yet inter-related pathways that involve an upregulation in the enzymatic activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). These pathways can be split into an endogenous oxygen-dependent pathway i.e., the catabolism of the amino acid L-arginine to L-citrulline concurrently yielding NO in the process, and an exogenous oxygen-independent one i.e., the conversion of exogenous inorganic nitrate to nitrite and subsequently NO in a stepwise fashion. Although a body of research has explored the vascular responses to exercise and/or compounds known to stimulate NOS and subsequently NO production, there is little research applying these findings to individuals with T1D, for whom preventative strategies that alleviate or at least temper vascular pathologies are critical foci for long-term risk mitigation. This review addresses the proposed mechanisms responsible for vascular dysfunction, before exploring the potential mechanisms by which exercise, and two supplementary NO donors may provide vascular benefits in T1D. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet and Exercise in Type 1 Diabetes)
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Open AccessReview
Carbohydrate Restriction in Type 1 Diabetes: A Realistic Therapy for Improved Glycaemic Control and Athletic Performance?
Nutrients 2019, 11(5), 1022; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11051022 - 07 May 2019
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 5659
Abstract
Around 80% of individuals with Type 1 diabetes (T1D) in the United States do not achieve glycaemic targets and the prevalence of comorbidities suggests that novel therapeutic strategies, including lifestyle modification, are needed. Current nutrition guidelines suggest a flexible approach to carbohydrate intake [...] Read more.
Around 80% of individuals with Type 1 diabetes (T1D) in the United States do not achieve glycaemic targets and the prevalence of comorbidities suggests that novel therapeutic strategies, including lifestyle modification, are needed. Current nutrition guidelines suggest a flexible approach to carbohydrate intake matched with intensive insulin therapy. These guidelines are designed to facilitate greater freedom around nutritional choices but they may lead to higher caloric intakes and potentially unhealthy eating patterns that are contributing to the high prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome in people with T1D. Low carbohydrate diets (LCD; <130 g/day) may represent a means to improve glycaemic control and metabolic health in people with T1D. Regular recreational exercise or achieving a high level of athletic performance is important for many living with T1D. Research conducted on people without T1D suggests that training with reduced carbohydrate availability (often termed “train low”) enhances metabolic adaptation compared to training with normal or high carbohydrate availability. However, these “train low” practices have not been tested in athletes with T1D. This review aims to investigate the known pros and cons of LCDs as a potentially effective, achievable, and safe therapy to improve glycaemic control and metabolic health in people with T1D. Secondly, we discuss the potential for low, restricted, or periodised carbohydrate diets in athletes with T1D. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet and Exercise in Type 1 Diabetes)
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