Editorial Board Members’ Collection Series "Advancements in Dietary Intake Assessment Methods"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition Methodology & Assessment".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 5 November 2024 | Viewed by 5027

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Health Sciences, Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, 635 Commonwealth Ave, Boston, MA 02215, USA
Interests: eating patterns; meal timing; dietary composition; taste preferences; sleep patterns; physical activity; appetite; obesity; energy regulation; chronic disease risk; psychological factors; dietary assessment methodology; wearable technology
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Guest Editor
Department of Oncology, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC 20007, USA
Interests: meal timing; dietary interventions; chronic disease risk; psychological factors; dietary assessment methodology; wearable technology; cancer prevention

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Dietary assessment is an important part of nutritional status evaluation. Dietary intake is also one of the most complex influencing factors in terms of maintaining human health, particularly due to its interaction with other factors affecting health. Accurately assessing diet has always been a challenge. With the widespread use of smartphones and the development and popularization of mobile apps and wearables, the monitoring and assessment of dietary intake is becoming less burdensome, and the methods of dietary intake assessment have also developed more and more rapidly.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to collect research on new methods for monitoring and assessing dietary intake, as well as current research progress, including the assessment of differences in nutrient and energy intake among different groups, and determining the risk of insufficient or excessive nutrient intake. In addition, papers assessing the relationships between lifestyle, physical activity and dietary intake, the consumption of certain food, the relationship between eating habits and eating quality are welcome for submission. Of particular interest are studies reporting on new technologies and objective methodologies for the assessment of dietary intake, including wearables, image-based methods, and the discovery of dietary biomarkers of intake using metabolimics. Original research and reviews are welcome.

Dr. Megan A. McCrory
Dr. Susan M Schembre
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • dietary assessment
  • diet monitoring app
  • technology
  • wearable sensors
  • image-based methods
  • dietary intake biomarkers
  • food intake
  • nutrition analysis
  • personalized nutrition
  • meal timing

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 1242 KiB  
Article
The Use of Three-Dimensional Images and Food Descriptions from a Smartphone Device Is Feasible and Accurate for Dietary Assessment
by Jeannette M. Schenk, Alanna Boynton, Pavel Kulik, Alexei Zyuzin, Marian L. Neuhouser and Alan R. Kristal
Nutrients 2024, 16(6), 828; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16060828 - 14 Mar 2024
Viewed by 774
Abstract
Technology-assisted dietary assessment has the potential to improve the accuracy of self-reported dietary intake. This study evaluates MealScan3D (MS3D), a mobile device-based food recording system, which uses three-dimensional images to obtain food volumes and an application to capture algorithm-driven food intake data. Participants [...] Read more.
Technology-assisted dietary assessment has the potential to improve the accuracy of self-reported dietary intake. This study evaluates MealScan3D (MS3D), a mobile device-based food recording system, which uses three-dimensional images to obtain food volumes and an application to capture algorithm-driven food intake data. Participants (n = 179) were randomly assigned and trained to record three meals using either MS3D or a written food record (WFR). Generous amounts of standardized meals were provided, and participants self-selected portions for each food. The weights of provided and uneaten/leftover foods were used to determine true intake. For total energy intake (three meals combined), validity (Pearson correlation) was significantly higher for MS3D vs. the WFR (p < 0.001); when interpreted as the percentage of variance in energy intake explained, MS3D explained 84.6% of true variance, a 25.3% absolute and 42.6% relative increase over the 59.3% explained by the WFR. For 9 of 15 individual foods, the Pearson correlations between true and reported portion size estimates were significantly larger for MS3D than the WFR. Bias was smaller (intercepts were closer to the means) for 9 of 15 foods and the regression coefficients for 10 of 15 foods were significantly closer to 1.0 in the MS3D arm. MS3D is feasible for dietary assessment and may provide improvements in accuracy compared to WFRs. Full article
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11 pages, 775 KiB  
Article
Development of a Semi-Quantitative Food-Frequency Questionnaire for Korean Adults with Obesity
by Jina Chung, Seoeun Ahn, Hyojee Joung and Sangah Shin
Nutrients 2023, 15(22), 4848; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15224848 - 20 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1232
Abstract
The increasing prevalence of obesity is a serious concern in Korea. However, there is currently no available food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) for examining the dietary patterns of adults with obesity. This study aimed to develop a semi-quantitative FFQ tailored to Korean adults with obesity. [...] Read more.
The increasing prevalence of obesity is a serious concern in Korea. However, there is currently no available food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) for examining the dietary patterns of adults with obesity. This study aimed to develop a semi-quantitative FFQ tailored to Korean adults with obesity. The dish/food items for the FFQ were extracted from the 24 h recall data of 8450 Korean adults (aged 19–64 years) with obesity who participated in the 2013–2019 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Among the 1709 dishes consumed, 475 were selected based on their high contribution to the intake or substantial between-individual variation in 11 nutrients: energy, carbohydrates, dietary fiber, sugar, fat, saturated fat, protein, sodium, vitamin A, vitamin E, and flavonoids. These dishes were subsequently categorized into 129 items based on their recipes and primary ingredients. The final 129 items included rice; noodles and dumplings; breads, rice cakes, and cereals; soups and stews; eggs, pulses, meat, and fish; vegetables and kimchi; fruit; snacks; beverages; milk/dairy products; alcohol; and water. The response options for intake frequency comprised nine options, and the intake amount response included three options (50%, 100%, and 150–200% of the standard intake). After validation, this FFQ is expected to be used in epidemiological studies to investigate the dietary patterns of Korean adults with obesity. Full article
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16 pages, 1661 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Acceptability, Functionality, and Validity of a Passive Image-Based Dietary Intake Assessment Method in Adults and Children of Ghanaian and Kenyan Origin Living in London, UK
by Modou L. Jobarteh, Megan A. McCrory, Benny Lo, Konstantinos K. Triantafyllidis, Jianing Qiu, Jennifer P. Griffin, Edward Sazonov, Mingui Sun, Wenyan Jia, Tom Baranowski, Alex K. Anderson, Kathryn Maitland and Gary Frost
Nutrients 2023, 15(18), 4075; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15184075 - 20 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1298
Abstract
Background: Accurate estimation of dietary intake is challenging. However, whilst some progress has been made in high-income countries, low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) remain behind, contributing to critical nutritional data gaps. This study aimed to validate an objective, passive image-based dietary intake assessment [...] Read more.
Background: Accurate estimation of dietary intake is challenging. However, whilst some progress has been made in high-income countries, low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) remain behind, contributing to critical nutritional data gaps. This study aimed to validate an objective, passive image-based dietary intake assessment method against weighed food records in London, UK, for onward deployment to LMICs. Methods: Wearable camera devices were used to capture food intake on eating occasions in 18 adults and 17 children of Ghanaian and Kenyan origin living in London. Participants were provided pre-weighed meals of Ghanaian and Kenyan cuisine and camera devices to automatically capture images of the eating occasions. Food images were assessed for portion size, energy, nutrient intake, and the relative validity of the method compared to the weighed food records. Results: The Pearson and Intraclass correlation coefficients of estimates of intakes of food, energy, and 19 nutrients ranged from 0.60 to 0.95 and 0.67 to 0.90, respectively. Bland–Altman analysis showed good agreement between the image-based method and the weighed food record. Under-estimation of dietary intake by the image-based method ranged from 4 to 23%. Conclusions: Passive food image capture and analysis provides an objective assessment of dietary intake comparable to weighed food records. Full article
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13 pages, 824 KiB  
Article
Factor Analysis of the Brazilian Questionnaire on Adherence to Ketogenic Dietary Therapy: Keto-Check
by Lenycia de Cassya Lopes Neri, Alexandre Archanjo Ferraro, Monica Guglielmetti, Simona Fiorini, Letícia Pereira de Brito Sampaio, Anna Tagliabue and Cinzia Ferraris
Nutrients 2023, 15(17), 3673; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15173673 - 22 Aug 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1376
Abstract
Background: several strategies are used to assess adherence to ketogenic dietary therapies (KDTs), the most commonly used being ketonemia or ketonuria, despite their limitations. The purpose of this article is to carry out an exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis on the proposed Keto-check [...] Read more.
Background: several strategies are used to assess adherence to ketogenic dietary therapies (KDTs), the most commonly used being ketonemia or ketonuria, despite their limitations. The purpose of this article is to carry out an exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis on the proposed Keto-check (adherence’s KDT Brazilian questionnaire). Methods: there was a methodological study of a quantitative nature, complementary to the analysis realized previously, with a complimentary sample. The factorial analysis was performed with Factor software for parallel exploratory analysis, replicability, and confirmatory factor analysis. Graphical representation was created according to the number of factors resulting from the analysis. Results: 116 questionnaires were reached by complementary data collection (n = 69 actual data, complementing n = 47 previous data) through online forms. A polychoric correlation matrix suitability analysis resulted in a significant Bartlett statistic (p = 0.0001) and a Kaiser–Meyer–Olkin (KMO) test of 0.56. The parallel factorial analysis resulted in two factors, graphically represented as “efficacy” and “adherence”. A confirmatory factor analysis, considered fair, indicated an RMSEA of 0.063, NNFI resulted in 0.872, CFI in 0.926, and GFI in 0.897. Conclusion: this study confirms the validity of Keto-check through a more detailed analysis. Adherence is the key to improving the effectiveness of KDTs; therefore, improving knowledge about it can lead to a better healthcare approach. Full article
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