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Geriatric Nursing Nutrition

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Geriatric Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 September 2024 | Viewed by 8817

Special Issue Editor

Unit of Dietetic and Clinical Nutrition, San Camillo Forlanini Hospital, Circonvallazione Gianicolense 87, 00152 Roma, Italy
Interests: nutrition; metabolism; human nutrition; insulin resistance; metabolic diseases; nutritional and metabolic diseases; nutritional education; glucose metabolism; malnutrition clinical nutrition

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nutrition is a cornerstone of healthy aging and plays a crucial role for the geriatric population to prevent or treat malnutrition, which is related to increased mortality and morbidity, with worse clinical outcomes for chronic diseases most frequently associated with older age. Due to the increase in prevalence of chronic non-communicable age-related diseases and the growth of the aging and older population, geriatric nursing nutrition covers a fundamental role in healthy aging. Moreover, quality of life and physical and psychological distress can also be improved by optimal nutrition.

Older age is often associated with declining functional status, impaired muscle function, decreased bone mass, immune dysfunction, anemia, reduced cognitive function, poor wound healing, and delayed recovery from surgery, to name some of the most frequent issues. In addition, many other problems can impair optimal nutrition and reduce food intake, such as dysphagia, depression, digestive or absorption problems, reduced appetite, and many more. Moreover, social barriers and personal burdens or basic food knowledge should be also taken into account to support appropriate nutrition in the elderly.

Obesity, osteosarcopenic obesity, frailty, anorexia, cancer prevention and treatments during cancer are just a few suggestions for possible contributions. Dietary and lifestyle interventions which aim to improve the nutritional status of elderly people are the core of this Special Issue. Malnutrition, both in excess and insufficient nutrition, or any specific issue related to possible age-related problems can be addressed.

Dr. Edda Cava
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • malnutrition
  • frailty
  • prevention
  • healthy aging
  • geriatric nutrition
  • nutritional status

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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11 pages, 576 KiB  
Article
Nutrient Intake and Its Association with Appendicular Total Lean Mass and Muscle Function and Strength in Older Adults: A Population-Based Study
by Miguel Germán Borda, Jessica Samuelsson, Tommy Cederholm, Jonathan Patricio Baldera, Mario Ulises Pérez-Zepeda, George E. Barreto, Anna Zettergren, Silke Kern, Lina Rydén, Mariana Gonzalez-Lara, Salomón Salazar-Londoño, Gustavo Duque, Ingmar Skoog and Dag Aarsland
Nutrients 2024, 16(4), 568; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16040568 - 19 Feb 2024
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Abstract
Treatment options for sarcopenia are currently limited, and primarily rely on two main therapeutic approaches: resistance-based physical activity and dietary interventions. However, details about specific nutrients in the diet or supplementation are unclear. We aim to investigate the relationship between nutrient intake and [...] Read more.
Treatment options for sarcopenia are currently limited, and primarily rely on two main therapeutic approaches: resistance-based physical activity and dietary interventions. However, details about specific nutrients in the diet or supplementation are unclear. We aim to investigate the relationship between nutrient intake and lean mass, function, and strength. Data were derived from the Gothenburg H70 birth cohort study in Sweden, including 719,70-year-olds born in 1944 (54.1% females). For independent variables, the diet history method (face-to-face interviews) was used to estimate habitual food intake during the preceding three months. Dependent variables were gait speed (muscle performance), hand grip strength (muscle strength), and the appendicular lean soft tissue index (ALSTI). Linear regression analyses were performed to analyze the relationship between the dependent variables and each of the covariates. Several nutrients were positively associated with ALSTI, such as polyunsaturated fatty acids (DHA, EPA), selenium, zinc, riboflavin, niacin equivalent, vitamin B12, vitamin D, iron, and protein. After correction for multiple comparisons, there were no remaining correlations with handgrip and gait speed. Findings of positive correlations for some nutrients with lean mass suggest a role for these nutrients in maintaining muscle volume. These results can be used to inform clinical trials to expand the preventive strategies and treatment options for individuals at risk of muscle loss and sarcopenia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geriatric Nursing Nutrition)
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12 pages, 286 KiB  
Article
Adherence to a Mediterranean Diet Is Inversely Associated with Anxiety and Stress but Not Depression: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of Community-Dwelling Older Australians
by Lisa Allcock, Evangeline Mantzioris and Anthony Villani
Nutrients 2024, 16(3), 366; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16030366 - 26 Jan 2024
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Abstract
Diet quality may be an important modifiable risk factor for mental health disorders. However, these findings have been inconsistent, particularly in older adults. We explored the independent associations between adherence to a Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) and severity of symptoms related to depression, anxiety [...] Read more.
Diet quality may be an important modifiable risk factor for mental health disorders. However, these findings have been inconsistent, particularly in older adults. We explored the independent associations between adherence to a Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) and severity of symptoms related to depression, anxiety and stress in older adults from Australia. This was a cross-sectional analysis of older Australians ≥ 60 years. MedDiet adherence was assessed using the Mediterranean Diet Adherence Screener (MEDAS), and the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS−21) was used to assess the severity of negative emotional symptoms. A total of n = 294 participants were included in the final analyses (70.4 ± 6.2 years). Adherence to a MedDiet was inversely associated with the severity of anxiety symptoms (β = −0.118; CI: −0.761, −0.012; p = 0.043) independent of age, gender, BMI, physical activity, sleep, cognitive risk and ability to perform activities of daily living. Furthermore, MedDiet adherence was inversely associated with symptoms of stress (β = −0.151; CI: −0.680, −0.073; p = 0.015) independent of age, gender, BMI, physical activity and sleep. However, no relationship between MedDiet adherence and depressive symptoms was observed. We showed that adherence to a MedDiet is inversely associated with the severity of symptoms related to anxiety and stress but not depression. Exploring these findings with the use of longitudinal analyses and robust clinical trials are needed to better elucidate these findings in older adults. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geriatric Nursing Nutrition)
9 pages, 563 KiB  
Article
Obesity in Nursing Home Patients: Association with Common Care Problems
by Silvia Bauer, Doris Eglseer and Franziska Großschädl
Nutrients 2023, 15(14), 3188; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15143188 - 18 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1403
Abstract
(1) Background: There is not much research about obesity in nursing homes although knowledge will help us to develop customized treatment plans and prevention strategies, which may help to decrease the burden for all persons involved. The objective of conducting this study was [...] Read more.
(1) Background: There is not much research about obesity in nursing homes although knowledge will help us to develop customized treatment plans and prevention strategies, which may help to decrease the burden for all persons involved. The objective of conducting this study was to describe the prevalence of obesity and the association between obesity and care problems in nursing home patients. (2) Methods: This study is a secondary data analysis of data collected in an annually performed cross-sectional study called “Nursing Quality Measurement 2.0”. A standardized and tested questionnaire was used to collect data. (3) Results: In total, 1236 nursing home patients took part, and 16.7% of them were obese. The multivariate logistic regression analysis results show that urinary incontinence is significantly associated with the presence of obesity (OR 2.111). The other care problems of pressure injuries, fecal and double incontinence, physical restraints, falls, and pain were not associated with obesity. (4) Conclusions: The results indicate that, in the nursing home setting, healthcare staff should pay special attention to the patients’ nutritional status and help patients to maintain a healthy weight and prevent a loss of muscle mass and function. Conducting more studies with larger sample sizes is recommended, as this will allow for differentiation among different obesity classes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geriatric Nursing Nutrition)
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Review

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17 pages, 612 KiB  
Review
Resources to Support Decision-Making Regarding End-of-Life Nutrition Care in Long-Term Care: A Scoping Review
by Heather Alford, Nadia Anvari, Christina Lengyel, Abigail Wickson-Griffiths, Paulette Hunter, Erin Yakiwchuk and Allison Cammer
Nutrients 2024, 16(8), 1163; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16081163 - 13 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Resources are needed to aid healthcare providers and families in making end-of-life nutrition care decisions for residents living in long-term care settings. This scoping review aimed to explore what is reported in the literature about resources to support decision-making at the end of [...] Read more.
Resources are needed to aid healthcare providers and families in making end-of-life nutrition care decisions for residents living in long-term care settings. This scoping review aimed to explore what is reported in the literature about resources to support decision-making at the end of life in long-term care. Four databases were searched for research published from 2003 to June 2023. Articles included peer-reviewed human studies published in the English language that reported resources to support decision-making about end-of-life nutrition in long-term care settings. In total, 15 articles were included. Thematic analysis of the articles generated five themes: conversations about care, evidence-based decision-making, a need for multidisciplinary perspectives, honouring residents’ goals of care, and cultural considerations for adapting resources. Multidisciplinary care teams supporting residents and their families during the end of life can benefit from resources to support discussion and facilitate decision-making. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geriatric Nursing Nutrition)
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