Recent Advances in Gluten-Free Diet and Celiac Disease

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutritional Immunology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 July 2024 | Viewed by 2621

Special Issue Editors

Departamento de Ciencias Biologicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Instituto de Estudios Inmunologicos y Fisiopatologicos—IIFP (UNLP-CONICET), Bv. 120 1489, La Plata 1900, Argentina
Interests: celiac disease; experimental enteropathy; inflammation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Thanks to the pioneering work of the Dutch pediatrician Willem Dicke in the 1950s, the gluten-free diet (GFD) has become the standard therapy for celiac disease (CeD), one of the most common life-long disorders. Through this simple and straightforward dietary treatment, thousands of lives have been saved and millions of patients have been able to live healthy lives. Recently, it has been discovered that the GFD can treat other gluten-related disorders (GRD), such as gluten ataxia and non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Nevertheless, the GFD has limitations, such as a less-than-optimal content of nutrients such as fiber and calcium, the risk of gluten contamination in many commercial foods, and a significant impact on the psycho-social aspects of daily life. As such, alternative/complementary dietary and non-dietary treatments are currently under scrutiny.

The aim of this Special Issue of Nutrients is to highlight recent advances in the gluten-free diet in CeD and other GRDs from a broad perspective, e.g., including new methods for gluten analysis, the clinical monitoring of adherence to the GFD, psycho-social quality of life in patients treated with the GFD, complementary/alternative treatments including gluten-free wheat flours, probiotics and drugs.

Prof. Dr. Carlo Catassi
Prof. Dr. Fernando Chirdo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • celiac disease
  • gluten-related disorders
  • gluten-free diet
  • wheat-related disorders
  • gluten
  • dietary treatment
  • adherence to the gluten-free diet

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

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15 pages, 290 KiB  
Review
Gluten and Wheat in Women’s Health: Beyond the Gut
Nutrients 2024, 16(2), 322; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16020322 - 22 Jan 2024
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Abstract
Since the rise of awareness of gluten/wheat-related disorders in the academic and clinical field in the last few decades, misinformation regarding the gluten-free diet (GFD) and its impact on health has been spreading among the general population. Despite the established link between gluten [...] Read more.
Since the rise of awareness of gluten/wheat-related disorders in the academic and clinical field in the last few decades, misinformation regarding the gluten-free diet (GFD) and its impact on health has been spreading among the general population. Despite the established link between gluten and celiac disease (CD), where a GFD is mandatory to reach clinical and histological remission, things are more complicated when it comes to non-celiac gluten/wheat sensitivity (NCGWS) and other autoimmune/dysimmune disorders. In the last conditions, a beneficial effect of gluten withdrawal has not been properly assessed, but still is often suggested without strong supporting evidence. In this context, women have always been exposed, more than men, to higher social pressure related to nutritional behaviors and greater engagement in controlling body weight. With this narrative review, we aim to summarize current evidence on the adherence to a GFD, with particular attention to the impact on women’s health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Gluten-Free Diet and Celiac Disease)

Other

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8 pages, 1028 KiB  
Brief Report
Dynamics of Serologic Change to Gluten in Celiac Disease Patients
Nutrients 2023, 15(24), 5083; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15245083 - 12 Dec 2023
Viewed by 787
Abstract
Serologic measures of tissue transglutaminase (tTG) immunoglobulin A (IgA) and deamidated gliadin peptide (DGP) IgA and immunoglobulin G (IgG) are hallmark tests utilized when diagnosing individuals for celiac disease (CeD) and for monitoring adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD), currently the only available [...] Read more.
Serologic measures of tissue transglutaminase (tTG) immunoglobulin A (IgA) and deamidated gliadin peptide (DGP) IgA and immunoglobulin G (IgG) are hallmark tests utilized when diagnosing individuals for celiac disease (CeD) and for monitoring adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD), currently the only available treatment for CeD. We address two issues in this study: (i) the relapse to seropositivity for CeD patients who resume a gluten containing diet and (ii) the correlation between two different tTG-IgA assays near the upper limit of normal (ULN) designated thresholds. Regarding the first issue, often a suspected CeD individual is put back on a gluten diet to return to their serologic levels. However, we show it requires a substantial amount of gluten for serology to return to a positive level. For example, in one study of 22 patients treated with placebo and taking 84 g of gluten over 6 weeks, only two converted from seronegative to seropositive for tTG-IgA. Regarding the second topic, we compare the relationship for different serologic assays, namely tTG-IgA AB (recombinant, ULN = 4 units/mL) vs. tTG-IgA (non-recombinant, ULN = 20 units). There is a strong correlation between both measurements as evidenced by a Pearson coefficient of R = 0.8584; however, we observed that the cross-correlation in terms of sensitivity and specificity improved substantially by using an ULN value of three instead of four for the tTG-IgA AB (recombinant) assay. This result suggests that assay thresholds used for initial diagnosis in patients who have not yet started a GFD may need to be adjusted for monitoring and in the setting of a diagnostic gluten challenge. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Gluten-Free Diet and Celiac Disease)
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