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Dietary Management and Nutritional Health for Age-Related Diseases

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Geriatric Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 June 2024) | Viewed by 6634

Special Issue Editors

Nutritional Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078, USA
Interests: aging, obesity; type 2 diabetes; food bioactive compound; nutrigenomics; insulin signaling pathway

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Guest Editor
Department of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Ulsan, Ulsan 44610, Republic of Korea
Interests: metabolic diseases; insulin resistance; obesity; diabetes; glucose metabolism; lipid metabolism; aging; sarcopenia; cardiac, muscle and liver energy metabolism; mitochondria
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Kinesiology, Nutrition, and Health, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056, USA
Interests: food bioactives; functional foods; obesity; colorectal cancer; chronic disease pre-vention; aging; gut microbiota
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Aging is a condition that loses the ability to maintain homeostasis due to dysfunction. Various factors influence the aging process, but so far, dietary management, lifestyle change and physical exercise are the only known mediators, except for genetic factors that lead to a delay or prevent age-related diseases. The purpose of this Special Issue, “Dietary Management and Nutritional Health for Age-related Diseases,” is to provide cutting-edge original research and review articles regarding the diverse properties of various vitamins in disease and healthy living conditions. This Special Issue will discuss the potential role of functional foods, dietary interventions including calorie control restriction, intermittent fasting, time-restricted eating and fasting-mimicking diets, and patterns such as ketogenic, Mediterranean, DASH and MIND diets on age-associated diseases. Articles addressing metabolic syndrome, inflammation (inflammaging) and neurodegenerative diseases are encouraged. Submissions as original research articles and reviews including system reviews are welcome.

Dr. Yoo Kim
Dr. ByungYong Ahn
Dr. Xian Wu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • age-related diseases
  • dietary management
  • dietary pattern
  • dietary intervention
  • functional food
  • food bioactive compound

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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17 pages, 8394 KiB  
Article
Curcumin Mitigates the High-Fat High-Sugar Diet-Induced Impairment of Spatial Memory, Hepatic Metabolism, and the Alteration of the Gut Microbiome in Alzheimer’s Disease-Induced (3xTg-AD) Mice
by Gopal Lamichhane, Jing Liu, Su-Jeong Lee, Da-Yeon Lee, Guolong Zhang and Yoo Kim
Nutrients 2024, 16(2), 240; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16020240 - 12 Jan 2024
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2555
Abstract
The escalating prevalence of metabolic diseases and an aging demographic has been correlated with a concerning rise in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) incidence. This study aimed to access the protective effects of curcumin, a bioactive flavonoid from turmeric, on spatial memory, metabolic functions, and [...] Read more.
The escalating prevalence of metabolic diseases and an aging demographic has been correlated with a concerning rise in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) incidence. This study aimed to access the protective effects of curcumin, a bioactive flavonoid from turmeric, on spatial memory, metabolic functions, and the regulation of the gut microbiome in AD-induced (3xTg-AD) mice fed with either a normal chow diet (NCD) or a high-fat high-sugar diet (HFHSD). Our findings revealed an augmented susceptibility of the HFHSD-fed 3xTg-AD mice for weight gain and memory impairment, while curcumin supplementation demonstrated a protective effect against these changes. This was evidenced by significantly reduced body weight gain and improved behavioral and cognitive function in the curcumin-treated group. These improvements were substantiated by diminished fatty acid synthesis, altered cholesterol metabolism, and suppressed adipogenesis-related pathways in the liver, along with modified synaptic plasticity-related pathways in the brain. Moreover, curcumin enriched beneficial gut microbiota, including Oscillospiraceae and Rikenellaceae at the family level, and Oscillibacter, Alistipes, Pseudoflavonifractor, Duncaniella, and Flintibacter at the genus level. The observed alteration in these gut microbiota profiles suggests a potential crosswalk in the liver and brain for regulating metabolic and cognitive functions, particularly in the context of obesity-associated cognitive disfunction, notably AD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Management and Nutritional Health for Age-Related Diseases)
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18 pages, 1128 KiB  
Article
Beneficial Effects of Oral Nutrition Supplements on the Nutritional Status and Physical Performance of Older Nursing Home Residents at Risk of Malnutrition
by Yi-Hsiu Chen, Che-Yu Lee, Jiun-Rong Chen, Min-Yu Ding, Feng-Qi Liang and Suh-Ching Yang
Nutrients 2023, 15(19), 4291; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15194291 - 8 Oct 2023
Viewed by 2066
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of nutritional supplement drinks (NSDs) and nutritional education (NE) on the nutritional status and physical performance of older nursing home residents who were at risk of malnutrition. This study was a clustered, randomized, [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of nutritional supplement drinks (NSDs) and nutritional education (NE) on the nutritional status and physical performance of older nursing home residents who were at risk of malnutrition. This study was a clustered, randomized, parallel, multi-center clinical trial, with 107 participants more than 65 years old and at risk of malnutrition recruited from several nursing homes in this study. Participants were divided into two groups: an NE group (n = 50) and an NSD group (n = 57). The NE group was given NE by a dietitian, while the NSD group was provided with two packs of NSD except receiving NE (Mei Balance, Meiji Holdings, Tokyo, Japan) per day as a snack between meals and before bed. Anthropometric data, blood pressure, nutritional status, blood biochemical biomarkers, and physical performance were measured before and after 12-week interventions. After 12 weeks of NE combined with NSD intervention, body weight, body-mass index, the mini nutritional assessment-short form (MNA-SF) score, walking speed, and SF-36 questionnaire score were improved in older nursing home residents at risk of malnutrition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Management and Nutritional Health for Age-Related Diseases)
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Review

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30 pages, 1925 KiB  
Review
Polyphenolic Compounds: Orchestrating Intestinal Microbiota Harmony during Aging
by Quélita Cristina Pereira, Isabela Monique Fortunato, Fabricio de Sousa Oliveira, Marisa Claudia Alvarez, Tanila Wood dos Santos and Marcelo Lima Ribeiro
Nutrients 2024, 16(7), 1066; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16071066 - 5 Apr 2024
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Abstract
In the aging process, physiological decline occurs, posing a substantial threat to the physical and mental well-being of the elderly and contributing to the onset of age-related diseases. While traditional perspectives considered the maintenance of life as influenced by a myriad of factors, [...] Read more.
In the aging process, physiological decline occurs, posing a substantial threat to the physical and mental well-being of the elderly and contributing to the onset of age-related diseases. While traditional perspectives considered the maintenance of life as influenced by a myriad of factors, including environmental, genetic, epigenetic, and lifestyle elements such as exercise and diet, the pivotal role of symbiotic microorganisms had been understated. Presently, it is acknowledged that the intestinal microbiota plays a profound role in overall health by signaling to both the central and peripheral nervous systems, as well as other distant organs. Disruption in this bidirectional communication between bacteria and the host results in dysbiosis, fostering the development of various diseases, including neurological disorders, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. This review aims to delve into the intricate biological mechanisms underpinning dysbiosis associated with aging and the clinical ramifications of such dysregulation. Furthermore, we aspire to explore bioactive compounds endowed with functional properties capable of modulating and restoring balance in this aging-related dysbiotic process through epigenetics alterations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Management and Nutritional Health for Age-Related Diseases)
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